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August 2, 2016

How to find a Notary mentor

Many new Notaries want to set up shop and get going. The problem is that they don’t know how. They haven’t mastered their Notary skills and have no idea how to complete a signing or even get a signing. They need a mentor — and fast! But, how do you find a mentor? Actually, there are various types of mentors, and that is something more critical to understand than anything else.

You can get an actual human being who lives near you who can be your mentor. If you are lucky, they will let you tag along at signings and explain things to you. You could also find someone far away who can coach you. The problem is that most Notaries who are good at Notary work might not be good at teaching Notary work, and even if they are, they might not care about teaching you.

Those who are too close to you might see you as competition. We’ve had many stories on 123notary about how a mentor trained someone new out of the goodness of their heart. The next thing you know, that new Notary steals all (or a good portion) of their mentor’s clients and puts their mentor out of business. It has happened many times.

So, what type of mentors should you be looking for? We suggest finding many sources of knowledge and help, as you cannot depend fully on any particular source.

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1. Hotlines
NNA has an amazing hotline. They are great at helping out with technical questions about ID’s, credible witnesses, out of state forms, international issues, and more. 123notary does not have a hotline, but people routinely email us asking us questions and we are happy to help. Some people call Carmen at 123notary, and she is very seasoned in all aspects of the Notary and Signing Agent process.

2. Local Mentors
Get one in the next county over so you are not in direct competition with them. Mentors know that you might cut into their market share, so they will be unlikely to help you if you are within 30 miles. To be safe, you can consider 50 miles. If you can go out on a few signings with them, that might really help out as you will have hands on experience with the documents and procedure. Just make sure you do your studying first before you go out on an assignment, so you’ll have some knowledge about the documents. Seeing the documents a lot is different from having a solid knowledge about what the salient features of the documents. So, don’t fool yourself into a false sense of confidence.

3. Far away mentors
If you can find someone who is great at answering questions over the phone, but is too far away to actually visit. 123notary has many Elite Certified Notaries throughout the nation who are excellent. I think that NNA used to have an official list of mentors that was nationwide. I am not able to find that list on the web anymore. But, if you want to mentor, just post a reply to this article.

4. Courses
Many Notaries want a mentor when they haven’t actually studied. There is no substitute for book knowledge. It is hard to find a good mentor unless they like you. But, it is easy to find a book. 123notary offers loan signing courses that will get you started in about two weeks. You can take our online test and be officially 123notary certified which counts for a lot when advertising on our site. You will learn all the pertinent terms, all about the basic documents, signing procedures, marketing, and more.

5. Blogs
Many Notaries have caught on to the idea that they can get free knowledge and advice by reading blogs. NNA and 123notary have excellent blogs with great technical and marketing information in addition to entertaining stories, and more. To use the 123notary blog effectively, it is better that you understand how the categories work. Here are a few categories we recommend:

The 30 point course
http://blog.123notary.com/?cat=3442

Loan Signing 101
http://blog.123notary.com/?cat=2053

Hospital & Jail Signings
http://blog.123notary.com/?cat=3251

How to get work & Who is getting work
http://blog.123notary.com/?cat=3264

Best Humorous Posts
http://blog.123notary.com/?cat=3241

Technical & Legal
http://blog.123notary.com/?cat=3244

We also have many subcategories under Marketing, Humor, Popular Posts, types of documents, and more.

6. Companies that micromanage
I learned more about loan signing from Nation’s Direct than from anywhere else. They taught me the ropes and were there on the phone to get me through my first 100 signings. They don’t pay that much, and Notaries complain that they micromanage, but they are a great place for newbies to get started in my experience. We have a list of companies that hire beginners. Those companies might tell you more about loan signing than any “mentor.”

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Companies that hire NEW signing agents!
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=7059

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July 4, 2016

Cheesy ways to promote yourself

Do you take your Notary business seriously, but want more clients? Here are some easy ways you can go about it.

1. Notary clothing.
So far, nobody markets this, but if you go around town wearing a polo or t-shirt with the name and phone # of your mobile Notary business, you might have some old ladies following you around Whole Foods who need a Notary. If you are a beautiful blond you might have some annoying guys follow you too who claim to need a Notary, but really need a blond!

2. Notary beach towels
When you go to the beach, do you bring your Notary beach towel with your business name and number on it? Someone might need their snorkel notarized.

3. Notary signs on your car
Perhaps your car should have your biz name, phone number and basic details about your notary business. People will see you parked and get the information to call you.

4. Call hospitals and convalescent homes and give them your number. You often don’t even need to visit in person.

5. Call title companies within 90 minutes of you. Some of them might actually use you.

6. Notary doggie clothes.
Forget about the t-shirt idea, get your dog a Notary outfit. Pets are a great way to attract positive attention.

7. The Notary Drone
You can have a drone fly all over town marketing your notary work with a huge banner. Just don’t crash it into a landing 747 or you’ll be in huge trouble. Personally, I feel that drones are extremely dangerous and unpredictable and should be banned by the FAA, FBI, CIA, and KGB.

8. Give everyone you meet your Notary card.
In Japan, people give their card to everyone. So should Notaries! Just hand them out as a Notary marketing technique. Hi neighbor, I’m a Notary, here is my card.

9. The Notary Beach Embosser
This Notary seal will leave a raised impression in wet or dry sand with your name, county, commission number and expiration date. But, if the tide comes in too fast, your expiration date might be short lived!

That’s all for now!

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Signing co’s hire you based on how good you are, NOT how good you claim to be!
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16556

Best Marketing Resources for Notaries
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16322

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June 30, 2016

NotariesWithPulses.com

At 123notary, we keep track of our Notaries. We make sure they are alive and that their phones are working. If you don’t login to your listing, we will either call you to make sure you are alive, or remove the listing in some cases. In fact, of all directories, ours has the highest rate of Notaries that are alive.

When I call people, I say, “I’m calling to verify that you are still alive and still a Notary.” Since we are so adamant about scrutinizing our database for deceased Notaries or dysfunctional numbers, perhaps we should rename our site NotariesWithPulses.com. It might get a few laughs.

Another idea I had was to have my psychic contact Notaries in the brighter world. That way we could see if there is any Notary work after death in heaven. You never know. Sometimes the angels need help. Plus, you can’t beat the idea of having an etherial seal.

One Notary who is currently alive who I am worried about has a business name Keys Notary. If this Notary gets an eNotary certification they will have to change their name to Electronic Keys Notary. I used an electronic key once. It had a mind of its own. But, they are still alive and that is the main thing (or the key thing.)

In any case, stay alive, and if for any reason you should die, just send us an email.

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A social media site for Notaries — Affiant
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=6410

Notary Match.com
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=8706

The Towles Booth
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=9456

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April 28, 2016

Waiting for Santa on a Christmas Signing & two other stories

Filed under: General Stories — Tags: , , — admin @ 7:22 am

A signing from Christmas past
Well, in this story, Santa had already came. The Notary was at the signer’s house waiting for the signers. The Notary had a list and knew if the signers had been good or bad. The reality was that the couple signing was flying in from another city and were stuck at the airport. They asked the Notary if he could wait for them to get home. The Notary foolishly agreed.

Now, if I were the Notary, I would only have agreed if the borrower’s could have called their neighbors and had me in for some glugg. I don’t even know what that is, but Swedish people drink it for Christmas. Eggnog would do the trick too. In any case, the Notary waited for a really long time. By the time the signers got home and signed the loan, five hours had gone by. Fortunately the signing was in California where it is not that cold. I think the Notary could have added to the drama by parking a fake sleigh in the front lawn.

Drunk and disorderly borrowers
I had a situation come up during one of my notary signings where I didn’t want to do any notary signings for 6 months. I didn’t want to do any notary work at all as a result of this signing. I went to a house where I was in a really uncomfortable situation where everyone there was really drunk. I felt really threatened, and not safe. I walked into the home and immediately felt like leaving. The lending company that sent me had no idea about this family’s drinking situation when I called them afterwards to tell them what happened. All I know is that after this situation, I call the clients and really talk to them at length to get a feel for what they are like. I ask lots of questions. I get as much information as I can about the signing and about them. First impressions really count, and if you walk into a situation and your gut tells you to leave, LEAVE! Bail on the signing immediately if you don’t feel safe. I am more cautious now after that signing, and I think it’s really important to always be aware of your surroundings, the people you are with, to always have an exit strategy, and to not be afraid to immediately walk out if it doesn’t feel right!

They had gone to the same high school as my deceased son
I had a closing with a family at the end of last year in the city I live in that was very interesting and heartwarming. We talked a lot during the signing and found that we had a lot of similarities in common, including the fact that most of the family’s children had gone to the same high school as my deceased son. When the mother asked who my son was and I told her his name, she immediately started screaming and calling for her daughter. My son had died 5 years earlier in an accident. Her daughter was classmates with my son and knew him. So I spoke to the daughter and the mother and found out that the mother’s sister’s son had just died suddenly. They asked me if I would be willing to reach out to her and speak to her and help her through the grieving process because I knew what that was like. My heart hurt for them and so of course I said yes, and I did just that. We’ve all become friends since this signing, and I’m glad that I was able to help them in more ways than just being a notary.

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What have you signed for me lately?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16197

Notarizing at a blind man’s home
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16132

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April 11, 2016

Minimum wage for Notaries

I was thinking about this yesterday. Notaries would be much more happy if there was some sort of a minimum wage. I remember Ben Carson claimed that there should be a separate minimum wage for people fresh out of high school or college otherwise they might never get hired. Personally, I think the government should stay out of wage setting as it creates artificial market situations which might make it too expensive to do business. If someone is sluggish, minimum wage might be more than they merit. And when you combine minimum wage with taxes, insurance, unemployment, and the rest, it might lead many to outsource their work overseas!

Our average Notary averages $105 per signing.
But, you can’t outsource Notary work overseas — at least not yet. Notaries would feel like they were being treated better if they were paid a fair wage. On the other hand, Notaries surveyed half a year ago were averaging about $105 per signing which is not bad at all. Just because you get bad offers doesn’t mean that you actually do signings for $60. It is sort of like looking at the asking prices for houses on the market. The asking price and the sale price are often very different and will give you a distorted view of the market.

Do beginners have merit?
In any case, I feel that beginner Notaries with no experience and no 123notary certification do not merit a minimum wage. Most of the Notaries I test by phone do not know their documents, signing terminology and additionally do even worse when I ask them simple Notary questions. The fact is that we have a lot of unqualified people out there who feel they are worth a lot. In addition to minimum wage for Notaries, I feel there should be minimum standards as well. I feel that our new 30 point test should be the standard, and a particular test result such as a 14 or 15 should be the minimum to be hired at all.

What should qualified Notaries make?
A Notary who has signed 400 loans (and an prove it with journals) and who has passed the 30 point test with an adequate score in my opinion is entitled to some sort of standardized minimum wage. I feel that

$60 per signing of 5-99 pages
$65 per signing of 100-125 pages
$70 per signing of 126-150 pages
$80 per signing of 150+ pages
10 cents per page for printing
50 cents per page for fax backs

I feel that a Notary with good test scores who has signed 4000 or more loans deserves a lot more than this, but the market can determine their value. Just because you test well, doesn’t mean you show up on time, well dressed and with a good attitude.

What do you think a fair minimum wage for qualified Notaries should be? What about for not so qualified Notaries?

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$40 for a signing 72 miles away?
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Is $75 enough to print 2 sets of docs, notarize & do faxbacks?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=10369

The “Met my fee” list of signing companies
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16979

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January 29, 2016

Pastor Notary – can you Pastorize a document?

Filed under: Humorous Posts — Tags: , , — admin @ 1:08 pm

We have many Notaries on 123notary who are members of the clergy. I always wonder when we will get a good Rabbi who can specialize in Kosher notarizations. But, I don’t think that the laws of Judaism discuss notarial acts just as long as you don’t notarize false gods or golden bulls. But, we have many Christians clergymen who are in the Notary business. The preform marriages, and do general Notary work as well.

One borrower found it nice to have a member of the clergy at his signing. He had been waiting his entire life to say something to a clergyman during a signing. “Forgive me father, for I have rescinded!”

But, my question (sorry to sound tongue and cheek) is if these religious types only notarize documents, or can they Pastorize a document as well? And if so, what would the Pastorization process be like. Would they plant some grass on the document to make it more like a pasture? Add a few cows? Or cook it briefly to kill the germs. I guess the world will never know. But, if you ever come across a Pastor Notary, as him/her/them and relay what you learned to us over here at 123notary. We’re dying to know.

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You know you’re a Notary when…
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Welcome to the Notary Zoo
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January 4, 2016

I just got two jobs & they said they found me on 123notary, what now?

Be all that you can be!
Congratulations and thanks for enlisting! I am so happy when newcomers get lots of work from our directory. We work night and day to make our notary directory great! But, what now? The answer is that listings need to be all that they can be. It’s just like the army without the bullets. But, we have basic training.

Inspect your listing. There are several things you need to do before you clean your gun or your stamp.

1. Ask for help with your notes section.
We can’t write it for you, but if you write something, we can critique it. A good notes section with specifics and some unique information about you will really draw people in.

2. Pass our certification test.
People who pass our test not only get more work, but get slightly more compensation per signing and have more opportunities to move up the list on 123notary.com. You will need to study, but the knowledge you gain you keep for the rest of your life!

3. Get a few reviews
We value reviews so much that we call hundreds of people per month to remind them of how important it is to get reviews from strangers. On any site that has reviews such as Yelp, Travelocity, etc., the people with the most reviews get the most work, so start asking for reviews and ask us for help if you encounter any trouble.

4. Move up in the ranks
After you have passed our signingagent test and have two reviews, it is time to upgrade and join the big leagues or as we call it, “Special Forces.” At least try to get a promotion so you can pull rank on someone.

5. Stay out of trouble
No notary lasts forever. But, we have had many last for more than a decade on our site. Ken got promoted to General as he writes great blog articles and is a source of knowledge and inspiration. However, a few others had a dishonorable discharge. You still need to login to your listing every 120 days, otherwise you could get in a little trouble with us. Maintain your listing regularly, shine your boots (or shoes) and see if you take your seal apart and put it back together in less than 85 seconds.

6. PTSD
One Notary got PTSD from having borrowers yell at him too much about the APR. It is better to call the borrower up and go over the major figures before going into combat. And as always — ask for backup if you need any!

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Getting the best notary jobs
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December 14, 2015

Don’t ask for a review at the wrong time

Filed under: Popular on Facebook (A little),Reviews — Tags: , , — admin @ 12:14 pm

Notaries are notorious for doing the wrong thing at the wrong time. Title companies are even worse when sending e-documents is concerned. How can the world keep spinning around on schedule while everybody on earth is so uncoordinated?

When, I lecture Notaries about how they need to ask for reviews, the timing is very important. Some ask too many people at once and then don’t do it again for three years. They’ll have three reviews on the same date that look like they wrote them. Take this advice instead. See how it’s done.

BORROWER: Gee, I love your work. You are the best Notary we’ve ever had!

NOTARY: Really? … I mean, thanks. Nobody has ever said that to me before.. I mean — I get that all the time.

BORROWER: Oh. Well, you explained everything to us nicely, showed up on time, and didn’t discuss politics like that “other” Notary who talked for two hours about how he didn’t like Obama-care.

NOTARY: Hmm. Well, it’s either that or Trump-care, whatever that is. By the way, 123notary has a review feature that’s easy to use. If others see that I have a realistic review or two on my profile, that would help so much. Would you mind writing a quick review for me? I can email you a link to my review page.

BORROWER: Sure, just don’t sell my email to an outsourced service abroad or Trump will tax you. My email is borrower2015@gmail.com

NOTARY: Got it. I will send you an email right now from my i-phone.

BORROWER: I bet Jeb Bush wants to put implants in those i-phones.

NOTARY: Actually, it is Obama who’s Obama-care manifesto of hundreds of pages who discussed implants. The senators didn’t read that part carefully or they probably wouldn’t have voted for it.

BORROWER: Between Trump and Ahmedanijan, I think we’re all doomed.

NOTARY: I agree. I just can’t believe that “other” Notary would bring up these topics at a signing though.

BORROWER: Ooops, just got an email. There it is…. let’s click on the link here. Yes, we just can’t figure out why he would be the one to bring up politics at a signing, especially at a signing where both signers have been registered democrats since we were of voting age — actually, card carrying registered democrats. Why, we wouldn’t vote for a republican if you paid us to, or offered us a break in our tax bracket. Hmmm. Let’s write something in the review. It wants my name, email, and a comment. Okay…

“Sam the Notary was excellent. He showed up on time and explained everything to us. Thank God he wasn’t like that ‘other’ Notary who showed up late and then had the audacity to discuss politics throughout the entire signing. Good God!”

BORROWER: Okay, your review has been published. Just wait for Jeremy to approve the message and it will go live.

NOTARY: How do you know the process?

BORROWER: Well, it’s a long story. You see my psychic whose name is Sam also told us that a Notary would come to our house. Sam the psychic is also a registered democrat by the way and swears by Obama-care. Anyway, he told us the entire procedure. We were just relieved to know that a Notary who was helpful would come to rescue us. I just loved your service. In fact, I love it so much, I wish Obama would create a new system called Notary-care.

NOTARY: Hmm. That sounds good. Like a dental plan. You pay every month, get penalized if you don’t pay, and then you can use a Notary who is on the list of acceptable Notaries, but you have to make a co-payment, and fill out twenty forms. I agree. That would make the world easier, and a better place, not to mention reducing the chance of Notaries getting involved in political discussions with borrowers.

BORROWER: Yes. And you know what’s funny? The Notary before that “other” Notary also had the nerve to discuss politics with us. What is it with these people?

NOTARY: I’m not sure, but I’m going to email Jeremy to add a new field on his database. A new search function where you can choose the political affiliation of the Notary. For you, I really feel you are better off with a democrat who doesn’t discuss politics at the signing.

BORROWER: My sentiments exactly.

COMMENTARY: On the other hand, if the borrower doesn’t praise your Notary work. Don’t bother them asking for a review because it won’t happen!

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123notary’s comprehensive guide to getting reviews
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16290

5 or 6 reviews doubles your business
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=8484

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December 3, 2015

How Notary work is similar to online dating

I read some material on how Aziz Ansari was talking about online dating and comparing it to applying for jobs. After reading his commentary, I feel that online dating can be similar to Notary work as well. Here are some scenarios.

After the Signing
After you finish the signing, should you call the borrower to tell them how much you liked the signing or should you text them? This depends on the age of the borrower. If the borrower is in their twenties, definately text them. But, if they are forty or over, don’t text them as they’ll probably prefer a call.

NOTARY: “luved the signing, tx”

On the other hand, if you are going to use broken English in your text, the borrower might get the wrong impression. It might be more professional to say,

NOTARY: “I had a wonderful time at the signing. Would it be possible to sign with you again?”

SIGNER: “I’ll think about it. But, I’m signing with other people these days.”

NOTARY: “Is it anything serious? Oh, I’m sorry. I guess I’m prying.”

Having Too Many Choices
One researcher who Aziz commented on learned that having more choices doesn’t make you happier. Life is sometimes easier when we only have a few choices. As a Notary, this is too true. Notaries who are wanted by hundreds of signing companies can never decide if they want to accept the job. What if a better offer comes in? It’s comparable to a beautiful girl at a dance hall. She has so many choices, she not only can’t decide, but takes them for granted. But, from a Notary point of view, it would be easier if all of the offers for signings came in at once, perhaps five at a time. You could pick two that you liked best based on their profile, and forget the rest. I think this business would be much more interesting if you could view an online profile of each borrower — their likes and dislikes, signing preferences, and interests.

NOTARY: So, what do you like to do on the first signing?

SIGNER: I like to sign on the table. Actually sitting on the table. What about you?

NOTARY: I prefer the sofa. If you have a clip board, it is much more relaxing. But, I hate it when you sit on the floor and use the coffee table.

SIGNER: I know… So, what are you doing after the signing?

NOTARY: Not much. Your place or mine? BTW, what’s your place like?

SIGNER: Well, we’re already at my place, so look around. But, since we’re already here, let’s do more sitting on the table. Cool. That’s my thing!

Opening Up
Some Notaries are just too serious at the signing. If you want the signers to open up, you need to be less serious. Instead of discussing the prepayment penalty. Get to know them a little better by discussing your last trip to the circus, or what happened on your last date. Or tell them about funny things that happened on your way to the signing. It’s always awkward on a first signing. So, learn the techniques of making your first signing less awkward.

Put yourself in the Notary’s shoes
Sometimes it might be easier if the borrower put themselves in the Notary’s shoes. They should realize that it is his first time signing with you. He doesn’t know you. He doesn’t know how he’ll react to you. Sure, he read your profile and knows how much you like borrower and signing pieces of paper. Also, try to understand all the different houses the Notary needs to go to and how demanding the job is.

What not to do on the first signing
One Notary did a signing for a borrower who was a little bit forward.

SIGNER: Would you like a Hershey’s kiss at the end of the signing.

NOTARY: “Sorry, I don’t accept Hershey’s kisses on the first signing — I’m not that kind of Notary!”

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Yes, it’s the Notary Dating Show!
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=15312

She learned more just by dating a Notary
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=14717

NotaryMatch.com — a dating site for Notaries
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=8706

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August 30, 2015

Decline Profitable Junk Work

Decline Profitable Junk Work
Some may feel “work is work” and take all they can get. Mobile notaries are not hobbyists; we do the work for the money. Some are able to charge more, for the same work, some less. Without a scheduling conflict, we want to “book” that work. Of course it has to be legal. But not all legal work is useful to our callers. Sometimes we know the end product, though legal, will be junk.

Case in point to illustrate: my late night caller has an emergency. They have an appointment with the Immigration folks in downtown Manhattan at Federal Plaza. They just noticed the requirement that their documents must be notarized. Routine so far, but a little probing uncovered the real facts. One of the documents is a birth certificate from China. The other is a divorce certificate, also from China. NY State law regarding “vital records” permits me to notarize as long as those types of documents did not originate in NY State. There are slightly different procedures for processing a photocopy; different from processing an original document.

I learn the birth certificate is in the Chinese language, and is original. Some specific wording is required, but it’s perfectly proper to notarize the signature of the person named on the document. But, will it be useful for their intended purpose? Frankly, I really don’t know. I suspect they will have to have the document translated by a licensed translator. The translator’s signature will be notarized, attesting to training and accuracy of translation. Atop that would go the caller’s statement as to being the rightful possessor of the document. But, I’m not sure. I explain this to the caller and suggest they contact the authorities as to specific requirements. I could have accepted the assignment; but I feel they would be walking in with notarized junk without the translation.

The divorce decree was even worse. Again, it was in Chinese; but this time the document was not an original, only a photocopy. Similarly, I could legally notarize the photocopy; again using NY State mandated verbiage for photocopies. But the acceptability for purpose is, IMHO, unlikely.

As practicing professionals we know a lot more about notary law than the general public. We also know a bit about bureaucratic processing requirements. Of course we don’t know “everything” but we should know the limits of our knowledge. When I am sure, or almost sure, the work product will meet the client needs it’s a go. But, as is often the case, I am unsure. When I express my doubts they usually ask “what do you think”. That’s calling for my opinion, or to phrase it a bit more honestly – for me to guess. I don’t like to guess, preferring to refer them to the proper authorities to ask their “how should I proceed” question. Also, answering “how should I proceed” comes very close to “playing lawyer”. That must be totally avoided.

Would it matter if the caller told me they were affluent, and wanted to “try” using my notary work; not caring if it was rejected? Sure, if they, knowing my concerns, wanted to “throw money at the project” – I would be happy to oblige. It has to be their informed decision based on whatever knowledge I can provide as to the likelihood of success. I’ve done many “let’s try it and see what happens” jobs. Rarely do I learn the outcome. I don’t know if my caller was pent house or poor house; nor does it matter to me. Ethical notaries will Decline Profitable Junk Work. But, will allow the client to overrule the notary when clients are making an informed decision.

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The art of the decline to new notary jobs
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=15783

The right to decline notarization
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=14664

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