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November 3, 2019

Are you safer at a psych hospital or a jail?

Filed under: Hospital & Jail Signings — admin @ 8:36 pm

Ken wrote a blog comment many years ago saying how a patient at a mental institution threatened to rip his ears off, lunged at him, but how a fast thinking security guard saved the day. People in mental institutions are out of their minds. I have visited many. For the most part people are docile and harmless, but there could be a few who are dangerous and how would you know as an outsider?

Many Notaries are too chicken to go to a jail. However, in jail, the bad guys are behind bars and cannot hurt you. I have only been face to face (without a glass separation) with an inmate in a room with a Sally port once. It was no big deal for me, but a woman might not have felt so comfortable.

Jails are places where there are Attorneys and women in the waiting room, guards, perhaps long hallways, elevators, and visitation rooms. You need a guard to pass the journal and pen back and forth to the inmate at a visiting room — that is the only main snag at a jail signing unless they have moved the inmate or are having a lock down.

So, basically you might not be familiar with jails, and there can be logistical issues. But, you will not be in danger as far as my experience tells me.

You might also like:

12 questions to ask for hospital notarizations
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20519

10 ways female notaries can protect themselves
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19196

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October 5, 2019

Hospital signing in reverse. The Notary was bedridden

Filed under: Hospital & Jail Signings — admin @ 11:20 pm

A Notary had to go to the hospital for a hernia. He was in pain and drugged part of the time. But, he had a thriving business. and his customers would come to see him in the hospital.

CUSTOMER: Hi, I need this Affidavit notarized. I’ll sign it right here. You’re paying attention right?

NOTARY: (nodding off) ummm.

CUSTOMER: You are paying attention right?

NOTARY: Oh yeah..

CUSTOMER: (signs the document) Can you fill out the Jurat and sign it here?

NOTARY: I am not myself today. I might need to do a signature by X

CUSTOMER: According to what you told me last time only elderly customers can do a signature by mark or X.

NOTARY: Just kidding. Let me just fill this out… okay. Now, do you solmenly swear to uphold the constitution of the United States against all enemies foreign and domestic?

CUSTOMER: When you say domestic, does that include Consuela my maid? she is foreign AND a domestic.

NOTARY: You just have to make things complicated.

CUSTOMER: And that Oath has nothing to do with my document. That is the morphene talking, right?

NOTARY: I was just testing you. I’m actually sober, believe it or not. That’s why I’m being so mean. When my father arranged my marriage to Maria he said, “And he’ll beat you constantly — but only when he’s sober which is very little of the time.”

CUSTOMER: How reassuring. Okay, my Oath please? Never mind. I solemnly swear under God that the contents of this document are true and correct to the best of my knowledge.

NOTARY: I hereby affix my stamp. I gotta get out of here. I don’t want to be late to the straight pride parade in Boston of all places. Don’t you just love people from Boston — how refreshing — standing up for traditional values.

CUSTOMER: Yes, I find them refreshing, especially when they call people a “fricking retahd.”

NOTARY: Me too – gotta love it. I pronounce you man and document.

CUSTOMER: I am going to pass on kissing the document.

NOTARY: That will make you more popular in Boston as a result.

You might also like:

12 questions to ask for hospital notarizations
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20519

A tale of four notaries at hospitals
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=463

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April 30, 2019

Power of Attorney in Jail or Prison

Filed under: Hospital & Jail Signings — admin @ 10:11 am

Power of Attorney in Jail or Prison

The most common documents to be signed in a jail are title documents to cars, or power of attorney documents. Please be advised that a Notary may not draft or give advice on documents unless they are authorized to do so by also being an Attorney, or in a legal support profession that is authorized to give legal advice. I do know personally know who other than Attorneys can draft documents, so ask an Attorney.

Many banks have their own power of Attorney forms. So, please be sure you are having the inmate sign the correct power of attorney that will be acceptable to your bank or whomever the document custodian is.

As always, please consult an Attorney before you decide which type of legal document to use, or draft a legal document such as a Power of Attorney.

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April 29, 2019

Identification for prison notarizations

Filed under: Hospital & Jail Signings — admin @ 10:06 am

Identification for prison notarizations

1. Inmate ID Cards
In Florida and California, there is such thing as inmate ID cards or an inmate identification card. These are issued by the Department of Justice of Bureau of Federal Prisons.

2. Wristbands
In other states, sometimes the Notary can use a wristband. But, that is subject to the laws of your state, so you will have to consult your state’s notary manual online.

3. Credible Witnesses
Credible Witnesses may be used to identify a person in many states. You need to ask the Notary Public who you intend to use what the rules are in your state for Credible Identifying Witnesses. Many states will allow two individuals who know the signer to vouch for the identity of the signer under Oath before a Notary Public and will allow this as a substitute for having proper identification.

4. Regular Identification Cards
Ideally, if you can find a current identification of the signer and bring it with you to the jail, this will make it a lot easier for the Notary to notarize the signer.

5. Guards
Guards at jails are normally helpful about passing the journal through the slit in the glass to the signer. However, they very rarely want to be involved in identifying inmates as a credible witness.

6. Thumbprinting
It is generally a good idea to thumbprint signers in the notary journal. Most Notaries do not do this, but it is prudent as you cannot fake a thumbprint and it is forensic evidence that can be used to prove the identity of the signer if the signing is ever investigated.

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April 20, 2019

Payment for Jail Notary Service

Filed under: Hospital & Jail Signings — admin @ 10:10 am

Payment for Jail Notary Service

Not all Notaries are experience at jail notarizations. It is recommended that they get an up front travel fee when they meet you. They should also charge for waiting time incrementally as well as for the notarizations. The fee for the actual notary work should be paid after the notary work is done while the other fees paid up front or during the waiting time which can be unpredictable at jails.

Additionally, it is recommended that if you are meeting a notary at a jail, you have a mobile phone and keep in contact with the Notary. It is common for clients to stand Notaries up at jails, so make sure the notary knows that you are serious about doing business and that you won’t be late.

Also, make sure all parties know where to park, and have directions going where they are going.

P.S. I have an acquaintance who did a job for one of those California legalized marijuana stores. Guess how they paid him? I’ll leave that to your imagination.

You might also like:

Jail notarization issues
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22137

Notarizing an arsonist at a jail
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=650

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April 12, 2019

Jail Notarization Issues

Filed under: Hospital & Jail Signings — admin @ 10:05 am

For those of you who need a Notary to visit an inmate at a jail, penitentiary, detention center or correctional facility, there are many issues at hand. I will try to explain those issues in an organized way in this informational article.

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Identification for Prison Notarizations – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22139
Lockdowns and inmate considerations – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22142
Payment for Mobile Notary Service – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22145
Personal Appearance of Signer – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22148
Power of Attorney Documents – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22151

.

We also have other articles about jail signings.

Find a notary who can notarize an inmate
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=21349

Notarization done at a jail rejected by police
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=17484

7 steps for jail notarizations
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=8634

Notarizing an arsonist at a jail
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=650

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April 10, 2019

Lock downs and Prison Notarizations

Filed under: Hospital & Jail Signings — admin @ 10:09 am

Lock downs and Prison Notarizations

It is common for jails to have lock downs. If you are meeting a Notary Public at a jail and there is a lock down, it is possible that your appointment will be cancelled. It is also possible that you will be held against your will in the building as long as the lock down lasts.

If you are going to be part of a jail notarization, there are several things you need to know.

1. Is the jail under lock down? You might call before you go. Lock downs can happen at the last minute, but if you call ahead of time, that decreases your chance of having a ruined appointment.

2. The prisoner may have been moved to another cell, cell block, or jail entirely. That will ruin your notary appointment as well.

3. The prisoner may not be willing to sign a particular document. If you go all the way to a jail only to find that the signer refuses to sign, you just wasted your time and so did the notary.

4. Waiting for guards. If you go to a jail, each jail has a different procedure for letting visitors in. Most allow Notaries in, however, the notary may be asked to stamp a blank piece of paper so that the jail has a record of the notary seal. Others who wish to visit in a jail might be allowed if they are going to be a credible witness, but explaining that to the jail staff might require a little skill, and it may or may not be allowed. So, check in advance. Step one is to get let in the jail and to know what area of the jail to go to. It is normal for the guards to search Notaries carefully, so be ready for that. Next, you have to ask for a guard to come. Once the guard comes, they can bring the correct prisoner in front of you in the area with the glass partitions. You will need the guard to pass the journal back and forth through the glass and inspect the pens and whatever else you send over.

You might also like:

Identification for prison notarizations
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22139

Jail notarization issues
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22137

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April 7, 2019

Inmate Identification Cards

For years, it has been difficult for Notaries to notarize inmates in jail or prison due to the fact that their wristband did not constitute an identification acceptable to many states. The problem has been solved in California and Florida.

California has an inmate identification card
A California Notary may accept an inmate identification card issues by the state Department of Correction and Rehabilitation.

Florida also has an inmate identification card
Florida allows Notaries to accept inmate ID cards issued by the U.S. Department of Justice or Bureau of Federal Prisons.

These forms of identification are reported to be acceptable for use by Notaries Public in their respective states. It would be nice if the other states would come up to speed as well and provide a legal means for identifying inmates.

California inmate identification card
California inmate ID card
Florida inmate identification card
Florida inmate ID card
Can you notarize an inmate with a wristband identification?
How do you identify an inmate in prison or jail?

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November 21, 2018

12 questions to ask for hospital notarizations

SAFETY TIPS AND 12 QUESTIONS TO ASK FOR HOSPITAL NOTARIZATIONS:
I get calls frequently for Notarizations in Jails and Hospitals.
This blog will focus on things you must do to protect yourself from lawsuits and damages when you get a desperate call to go out to a hospital to notarize documents to be signed by a patient, moistly a Power of Attorney. The phone call invariably comes from the child who has a parent admitted to the hospital.
What do you do as the Notary when the person calling says they will pay you whatever you charge as your mobile fee? Remember Rule #1: It is not always about the money. It is about your ability to follow the Notary laws and perform your job without taking short cuts.
The following list of questions is a short summary of the steps I have actually taken when I got such a call.

1. What is your relationship to the patient?
2. Do you have any other siblings or relatives who have a beneficial interest in the transaction?
3. Is the patient conscious? Coherent? On any medication?
4. Does the patient have a current valid ID with him or can you make it available when the notary arrives at the hospital?
5. Is the patient able to sign his name without any help?
6. Does the patient speak English and can he understand and answer simple questions coherently?
7. Does the patient have an attending physician and a Nurse assigned to him?
8. Do you have the number to the attending physician and nurse because I need to talk to them to get an accurate idea of the health and overall condition of the patient?
9. When can I talk to the patient directly by phone with a nurse present in the room?
10. What type of document are you having notarized?
11. What dates and times work for the patient?
12. My mobile fees are _____ and $15/signature notarized. After I get there if I make the determination that the person is unable to understand anything I ask him or is being forced to sign, I will not be able to notarize the document but will still charge you my mobile fee for coming out based on your representations over the phone. Are you okay with that because I don’t want to get into any arguments after I get there?

Believe me there has been more than one occasion I can recall where I had to leave without notarizing a document because the patient was unable to understand anything I asked, was incoherent and simply could not sign or even hold a pen to just mark an “X”. It is better to walk away from a Notarization where you know instinctively that it is wrong because the signer is not aware of what he is signing and inevitably you will end up being a party to a litigation by interested parties who believe that the Notary failed to take into account the coherence and soundness of mind of the signer at the time of the Notarization. This would invalidate your notarization and worse yet force you to pay legal expenses to defend yourself. Is it worth it? Absolutely not!

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You might also like:

The carrot, the stick, the notary, and the bag
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=3951

When to ask for ID over the phone & fees at the door
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=15282

A tale of four notaries at hospitals
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=463

Hospital Notary jobs from A to Z
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=76

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September 4, 2018

Find a Notary who can notarize an inmate at Men’s Central, Twin Towers, Century Regional. Pitches Detention Center

Do you need a Notary who can do prison notarizations? 123notary has many Notaries who offer mobile service to jails, prisons, correctional facilities, penitentiaries, and detention centers. Here are some issues involved:

1. Someone needs to meet the Notary at the jail. That person can be an Attorney, family member, friend, or paid assistant.

2. The inmate must have identification that is satisfactory to the state where the notarization takes place. It is ideal if the person meeting the Notary has a current ID for the inmate such as a valid and current driver license, ID card, passport, etc. However, if the inmate has a wristband or jail ID card that is acceptable to the state where the notarization is taking place.

3. A California Notary may accept an inmate identification card issues by the state Department of Correction and Rehabilitation.

4. Florida allows Notaries to accept inmate ID cards issued by the U.S. Department of Justice or Bureau of Federal Prisons.

5. Credible witnesses are allowed in most states. A credible witness is a person who can vouch for the identity of a signer who does not have ID. Typically the credible witness must swear under Oath as to the identity of the signer (exact procedure depends on state laws) and must be identified by the notary and sign the journal in the additional information section. Some states allow one credible witness who knows both the Notary and inmate while others allow two who both know the signer, but don’t necessarily know the Notary. Other states allow one or two, while some states do not allow identification via credible identifying witnesses.

6. In states that require a journal, you must find a way to get the journal to the other side of the glass. Normally a warden will be happy to assist you with this task, however wardens might keep you waiting for five or ten minutes in my experience.

7. Lock downs happen in jails. If a lock down happens, you might be asked to leave, or might be taken virtually hostage until the lock down is over.

8. The Notary must have full vision of the signer and the signer must appear before the Notary. It is okay if the signer is on the other side of a glass provided that direct communication is possible. In my opinion, the signers should be within about five feet of the Notary otherwise you cannot fulfill the “personal appearance” requirement of most Notary acts.

9. Power of Attorney documents are common documents to be notarize in a correctional facility. That document normally requires an Acknowledgment which is a common Notary act which just requires the signer to sign the document, and then sign a Notary journal (most states but not all states). The Notary would need to check whatever ID the inmate has available and enter that information into the journal.

10. You can find a Notary on 123notary.com to do your jail signing. It is best to bring cash, and pay the travel fee up front. Then pay waiting time and whatever fee there is per signature after the work is done. Each Notary has their own fee and method of collecting their fee. Paying in two stages makes it easier for the Notary as some people try to get out of paying the Notary at all if there is any type of problem getting the inmate to come to the visiting room or sign, or be identified.

You might also like:

See our Jail Notary string
http://blog.123notary.com/?tag=jail-notary

A guide to notarizing for prison inmates
https://www.nationalnotary.org/notary-bulletin/blog/2016/07/guide-notarizing-for-prison-inmates

Jail notarizations forum string
http://www.notaryrotary.com/archive/forum/2009/March/Jail_Notarizations.html

Jail signing information
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/notary-jail-signing-information-susana-landa

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Find a Notary who can notarize an inmate
Find a Notary who can travel to a jail.
Find a Notary who can notarize at a jail.
Find a Notary who can travel to a prison.
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Find a Notary who can notarize at a detention center.
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Find a Notary who can notarize at a correctional facility

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Find a Notary who can notarize at a Los Angeles County prison facility
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How can I obtain a valid government issued ID from prison?
Is a state prison ID government issued?
Notary goes to prison
Can a notary go to jail?
Do jails provide a notary?
Can you go to jail for notarizing a family member in Florida?

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