Public Interest Archives - Notary Blog - Signing Tips, Marketing Tips, General Notary Advice - 123notary.com
123Notary

Notary Blog – Signing Tips, Marketing Tips, General Notary Advice – 123notary.com Control Panel

September 1, 2018

How much does a Notary cost in 2018 & 2019?

Filed under: Public Interest — Tags: — admin @ 11:04 am

How much do Notaries charge?
How much can a Notary charge?
How much is a Notary?

Notary fees are regulated by the laws of the various fifty states. So, each state has a different rate that a Notary can charge and a different procedure for a Notary to get a Notary commission. In addition to charging officially designated maximum Notary fees, many Notaries on our directory travel to their clients and charge travel fees in addition to waiting fees if you keep them waiting too long. It is common for Notaries to have a fixed price for loan signing packages that range from $75 to $150 per signing which is a price that might include printing eDocuments. But, let’s try to give you a better idea of what particular states offer as Notary fees.

Please keep in mind that there are also fees for Oaths & Affirmations which are done in all states that I am aware of. There are also more obscure Notary acts done in particular states that are not done in all states.

How much can an Alabama Notary charge?
$5 for an Acknowledgment or Jurat.

How much can an Alaska Notary charge?
There is no set fee but I heard that in remote areas Notaries get paid in moose or salmon (generally fresh).

How much can an Arizona Notary charge?
An AZ Notary may charge $10 per Acknowledgment (for the first signer) and $10 per Jurat.
Fees changed as of March 2018 up from $2 per signature.

How much can a California Notary charge?
A California Notary Public may charge $15 per Acknolwedged signature or per Jurat. There are other types of fees, but those are the most common.

How much can a Florida Notary charge?
A Florida Notary Public may charge $10 per Acknowledgment, however the price is fixed no matter how many signatures are on the notarized document. Jurats would also be $10.

How much can an Illinois Notary charge?
An Illinois Notary may charge a whopping $1 per Acknowledged signature or for a Jurat.

How much can an Indiana Notary charge?
$2 per Acknowledgment or Jurat

How much can a Maryland Notary charge?
A Maryland Notary may charge $4 per Acknowledgment or Jurat

How much can a Michigan Notary charge?
A Michigan Notary may charge up to $10 per Jurat or Acknowledged signature.

How much can a Minnesota Notary charge?
Generally $2 per Acknowledgment or Jurat

How much can a New Jersey Notary charge?
A New Jersey Notary can charge $2.50 per Acknowledgment, Jurat, or Oath

How much can a New York Notary charge?
A New York Notary may only charge $2 per Acknowledged signature or Jurat or for each sworn witness.

How much can a North Carolina Notary charge?
A North Carolina Notary may charge $5 per principal signature on an Acknowledgment or Jurat.

How much can a Pennsylvania Notary Public charge?
A Pennsylvania Notary may charge $5 for the first Acknowledged signature and $2 for each subsequent signature. Jurats are $5 per piece.

How much can a Texas Notary charge?
A Texas Notary Public may charge $6 for the first Acknowledged signature and $1 for each additional plus $6 for administering an Oath.

How much can a Virginia Notary Public charge?
A Virginia Notary may charge $5 for each Acknowledged signature or Jurat.

HELP, my state was not on the list…
No problem, just click on the FIND A NOTARY link and look up your state. We have pricing for all states documented in our website.

NOTE: Prices are subject to change. If our pricing has become outdated for any particular state, do not comment on this blog, rather, email us at info@123notary.com and politely inform us of the price change.

For states not mentioned or updates in the future, please refer to
https://www.nationalnotary.org/file%20library/nna/knowledge%20center/outside%20pdfs/state-notary-fees-chart.pdf

You might also like:

See our information about Acknowledgments (string)
http://blog.123notary.com/?s=acknowledgment

Index of posts about general Notary information
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20264

Basic Notary acts
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19500

What does a Notary cost in 2016?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=18778

Share
>

August 30, 2018

Notary Public Information


Notary Public


If you would like general information about the Notary world, read this! There are many things to know about the Notary world from how to become a Notary, how to find one, and the particular types of jobs and Notary acts Notaries do (or commit.) We will try to elaborate on all of this information below.

.

Become a Notary Public

To become a Notary Public requires contacting your state’s Notary division. Most states have rules for who can become a Notary.

.

No felons allowed!
You generally have to be free of felony convictions or of convictions of crimes that involve moral turpitude such as fraud.

Residency requirements
You should be a legal resident of the state you want to be commissioned in as a general rule, although some states allow residents of neighboring states who work in state.

No citizenship requirements
You generally do not need to be a US citizen, although you should be able to read, write and speak English well.

You need to be 18 or older in most if not all states.

State Notary Divisions Contact Info
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=1941

.

What do Notaries do?
Notaries can perform a short variety of Notarial acts which can differ from state to state. These acts include performing Acknowledgments, Jurats, Oaths, Affirmations, Proofs, and some states allow Copy Certification of Powers of Attorneys or other documents, Witnessing, Safety Deposit Openings, Protests for non-payment of bills and more. Let’s focus on understanding the more universal acts first.

Acknowledgments — A Notary Public may notarize an Acknowledged signature which is a signature that a signer acknowledged signing. This involves the signer presenting a signed document to the notary, signing the Notary’s journal, and presenting current government issued photo ID to the Notary. The rules may differ from state to state, but this is a general description. Read more…

Jurats — A Notary Public may execute a Jurat which would involve the signer or Affiant (one who swears under Oath or signs an Affidavit) to sign and swear to the document in the presence of the Notary Public. Read more…

Oaths — Notaries can administer (supervise) Oaths as well. Oaths are by definition part of the Jurat procedure for Oaths on documents. But, Oaths can also be done for remote court attendance for Florida Courts by Notaries and Oaths on oral statements. Read more…

Affirmations — Affirmations are similar to Oaths. Affirmations are also formal statements made under the legal penalty of perjury, but do not use the traditional verb “swear” or the term “under God.” In an Affirmation you affirm on your honor rather than to a higher power. Read more…

Proofs of Execution — Proofs are an unusual Notary act that cannot generally be done for important documents. But, the signer can sign in front of a subscribing witness (a person who sees them sign) and then the witness can appear before the Notary and have the Notary fill out a certificate indicating the same. Read more..

.

Notary FAQ

.

Q. How long is a Notary term?
A. The term for Notary Public is generally from 3 to 10 years and is up to the state. Louisiana commissions Notaries for life.

How long is a Notary term? — http://blog.123notary.com/?p=4606

Q. What is a Notary’s jurisdiction?
A. Normally, a Notary can notarize in any county of the state(s) they are commissioned in. Louisiana commissions either statewide or to their home parishes plus reciprocal parishes. There are a few exceptions nationally to this rule, and military Notaries have a very different type of jurisdiction that you can look up.

Q. Can a Notary get in trouble?
A. Notaries who break the law, make errors filling out forms, or don’t keep a journal can get in big trouble with the law, and even be treated like a suspect in identity fraud if they don’t leave a good paper trail. Notaries who cause damages to parties by upholding the law can get in trouble too if they don’t clearly explain the reason why they cannot offer services.

Q. What do I need to be notarized?
A. As a general rule, a current government issued Photo-ID, and a statement or document to be notarized is all you need.

Q. How much does a Notary cost?
A. Notary fees are set by the states and Notaries can run anywhere from 25 cents to $15. You can look up Notary fees on state notary division websites. I believe that all states except North Carolina keep their information open to the public.

How much can a notary charge — http://blog.123notary.com/?tag=how-much-can-a-notary-charge

Q. How much does a Mobile Notary cost?
A. Some states have rules for how much a person can charge for travel fee. But, generally rates run from $25 to $60 for mobile fees plus the cost of the actual notarization.

Q. Can a notary notarize in a jail?
A. Yes, but you need to make sure the inmate can be identified in a way acceptable to the state where he/she is incarcerated.

Jail Notary Jobs from A to Z — http://blog.123notary.com/?p=151

.

Additional Helpful Links

Notary Public 101
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19493

How to become a successful Mobile Notary from scratch
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=13340

Signing Agent Best Practices: 63 Points
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=4315

Seven error free ways to identify a signer
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=15288

Notary Vocbulary in our Glossary
http://www.123notary.com/glossary/

.

Share
>

August 19, 2018

Index for posts about general Notary information

Filed under: Public Interest — Tags: , — admin @ 2:18 am

Notary Public 101 — a comprenhensive guide to Notary best practices
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19493

Notary information for beginners — best links to articles
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=10472

See our string on “Notary Public”
http://blog.123notary.com/?tag=notary-public

What is a Notary Public?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=6498

Where can i find a Spanish speaking Notary?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=18824

How much does a notary cost?
http://blog.123notary.com/?tag=how-much-does-a-notary-cost

10 risks to being a mobile notary public
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19459

Basic Notary vocabulary
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19495

All you need to know about notary work
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=2354

How much does a Notary charge?
http://blog.123notary.com/?tag=how-much-does-a-notary-charge

How do I get a Spanish language document notarized?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=18822

How do I find a Vietnamese speaking Notary?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=18816

Share
>

November 8, 2017

10 reasons why the State Notary divisions should be nationalized.

Filed under: Public Interest — admin @ 1:23 am

Normally I am in favor of state rights. But, as far as Notary Public issues are concerned, the states are not doing a good job except for California for whom I would give a C. Here are some compelling reasons why the notary divisions should be nationalized.

1. Education
Most states either do not have educational programs for Notaries, or don’t have very good educational programs. The state notary handbooks have a variety of laws and practices, but do not generally spell out exactly how to interpret or apply laws or what to do in particular situations that arise regularly that could cause confusion or danger. Some states have too many laws which make it hard to learn them all. While other states have too few laws. If we would have just the right amount of laws, and those laws would be nationalized, and well taught, there would be a higher percent of highly informed Notaries who do their job correctly at all times which is my goal.

2. Testing
Not all states have a Notary Test. Those that do have a Notary test normally have a multiple choice written test. Testing people on nitpicky legal issues is fine and dandy, but if a Notary cannot fill in a journal or forms correctly then what good are they? Hands on testing and testing people to see how they handle curve-balls such as legal requests that seem illegal or illegal requests that seem legal is absolutely necessary in my opinion.

3. Auditing
Notaries get away with all sorts of mischief in all states. Most Notaries not only omit legally required Oaths, but claim not to understand my instructions when I ask them to give me an Oath on a document. Many Notaries do not keep their journal correctly which is a danger to society. If there is identity theft, the journal is the only means to know what happened at a transaction and the journal thumbprint is the only way the FBI can catch the bad guys in many cases. Notaries nationwide need to be checked up upon once or twice a year to make sure they are not doing anything wrong. For the government to have time to check up on everyone, there needs to be fewer Notaries otherwise the job would take too long.

4. Standardization of Notary Acts
There are many variations on Notary Acts from state to state. It can be confusing for interstate transactions and for people who run nationwide Notary associations. It is easier if there are standardized acts nationwide and standardized laws.

5. Thumbprinting
Many Notaries on 123notary helped the FBI catch some awful criminals who did Ponzi schemes, identity theft and more. It was the thumbprint that was the critical piece of evidence that helped catch the bad guys. Most Notaries outside of CA feel they should not have to take thumbprints. Having national laws requiring thumbprints is the only way to safeguard society from cons.

6. Quality Standards
Before a prospective Notary takes a course, they should take a quick IQ test and personality test to see if they are well adjusted to be a Notary Public. Someone with an IQ of 100-120 who is anal, picky, has tremendous integrity, and follows the law to the letter and fills out forms correctly every time would be the ideal candidate to be a Notary. People who have screws loose are dangerous as Notaries because they will accept illegal requests becuase they can’t keep the law straight in their head. I find this out during testing as my over the phone test asks people which situations are acceptable to notarize and more than half of our Notaries decline legal requests while accepting illegal requests. Quality control is easier on a national level to make sure all Notaries know what they are doing to a T.

7. Notary Fees
Most states have ridiculously low Notary Fees. To attract good Notaries, Notary fees need to be at least $20 for the first Notary act and at least $40 for a travel fee for jobs more than 25 minutes away. Notaries in states that pay 50 cents for a Notary act tend not to be very good Notaries. Can you imagine why?

My recommendations

1. Four days of Notary education training that covers laws, processes, identifying people, administering Oaths, form filling, journals, and dealing with legal vs. illegal requests. One day of training is not enough to do a thorough job of covering all the bases here. Additionally, a refresher course for a few hours once or twice a year might help keep knowledge solidly in a Notary’s head as well.

2. A written and hands on test that could be one on one makes sense. What good is knowing the law if you don’t know how to fill in necessary forms?

3. Higher fees to become a Notary. To weed out applicants that are not serious, higher fees and more days of school will weed out people who don’t absolutely want to become a Notary Public.

4. The government should check up on Notaries at least once per year to make sure they are not skimping on responsibilities or accepting illegal requests. An undercover government worker could coerce the Notary to do something illegal to see if the Notary would comply and then fine the Notary if the Notary complied.

5. State websites (taken over by the Feds) should spell out all Notary situations and applications of laws. Identification standards should be the most emphasized as that is a huge area of contention. Names on ID’s do not always exactly match names on documents and formal standards for handling every type of mismatch should be documented on websites.

6. Most states do not make it clear that an Acknowledged signature can be signed (in 44 states) prior to appearing before the Notary Public. Most Notaries are falsely under the impression that they need to witness acknowledged signatures. What good are laws if the laws are not clearly explained? This is the most clear cut example of a law that is misinterpreted more than it is correctly interpreted. Thank God I went to a good Notary school when I became a Notary!

Share
>

May 11, 2017

Notarize App turns your iPhone into a medium to get notarized!

On the road? Need to get notarized in a hurry? Well now you can! If you have an iPhone and the notarize app, you can just get notarized over the phone. Eliminate the hassle of trying to find a Notary at the last minute. This procedure has been legal in Virginia since 2011. Just go to your App store and get the notarize app today! You can be notarized using your phone in any of the 50 states plus Washington DC.

Virginia is trying to be modern which is probably why they allow this. However, the lack of personal appearance ruins the whole point of requiring a notary!

Just upload your document using email, cloud or dropbox, or other app with similar capabilities and then prove your identity by taking a photo of your ID. Never mind that 100 signing companies also have a photo of your ID and can claim to be you! Then, you can be connected on video “face to face” (or non-face to non-face) and then the notarization will take place. There is a $25 fee per notarization and the app is FREE.

Next year they will probably come out with the Marriage App, where you can marry a nice Russian girl (no questions asked). The app will process immigration paperwork and even find a flight for your new honey to board to come to the United States. If you don’t like her, just use the new app called SwapWyfe and get a new Russian beauty (who looks good without make up).

You might also like:

See the original Notarize App article
https://9to5mac.com/2016/02/04/notarize-licensed-notary-iphone/

New Notary Apps that you really need!
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=9797

FASS has a brand new app
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=17477

See our string on appshttp://blog.123notary.com/?s=apps

Share
>

May 4, 2017

Where can I find a Spanish Speaking Notary?

Where can I find a Notary who speaks Spanish?
Look no further. 123notary.com has many Spanish speaking Notaries on board. Just look up a Notary by zip code and then use the language filter at the top right of the site. You can enter in the name of any language such as Spanish, Japanese, Vietnamese, American Sign Language, or more! In fact, we have Spanish speaking Notaries in almost all states and metros by the dozen! Additionally, we have a search filter directly above the search results where you can check the Spanish box and find only Spanish speaking Notary service providers.

How good is their Spanish language proficiency?
On 123notary.com, we have many Notaries who speak Spanish. The degree of fluency varies from Notary to Notary as some are conversational while others are native speakers. A handful are from Spanish speaking families who grew up in America and might be excellent at conversation but not as proficient at business oriented communication. So, test your Spanish speaking Notary out over the phone to make sure they are up to your standards before hiring them!

Notary Spanish — Attorneys vs. Non-Attorneys
Please be advised that Notaries in the United States are seldom Attorneys and non-Attorney Notaries may not give legal advice. Most Notaries are also not authorized to draft legal documents. There are affordable legal support centers where they can help you draft documents. Please make sure that your document is completely drafted before contacting a Notary Public from 123notary.com.

Immigration Advice
Notaries cannot give advice about immigration matters unless they are specifically licensed to do so. For immigration questions, please contact the proper authorities.

Notarizing in Spanish?
Notaries may Notarize a document that is in Spanish, however the Notary wording would be in English for the notarization. Some states require the Notary to be able to understand the document. Other states require the Notary to be able to communicate directly with the borrower in any language they both can communicate with. Please learn the laws of your state and how they apply to notarizing foreign language documents. The actual Notary wording must be in English if it is to be notarized in any of the 50 states in the USA. Each state has their own official Acknowledgment and Jurat Notarial wording which the Notary is responsible for knowing. The Notary wording can be included at the end of the document. However, the Notary can also staple a loose certificate form to the document and affix their seal to that certificate after it has been completely filled out. Signers will be required to sign the Notary journal in states where Notary journals are used (which includes most states.)

Oaths in Spanish?
Some Notary acts such as Jurats, Oaths, or other acts that include Oaths such as swearing in credible witnesses require the Notary to administer an Oath. An Oath for an English language document or Spanish language document can be performed in the language of your choice. If the signer or affiant feels more comfortable in Spanish and the Notary knows Spanish, you can conduct your Oath in Spanish.

How can I get a Spanish language document notarized?
As stated above, some states require the Notary to understand the language of the document while others don’t. However, the language of the notarization itself would be in English. You can find a notary on 123notary who speaks Spanish to assist you in this matter. Just visit our Advanced Search page and look up a Spanish Speaking Notary by zip code!

You might also like:

Find a Notary — who provides 24 hour service on 123notary!
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=4635

Power of Attorney Notarizations
http://blog.123notary.com/?tag=power-of-attorney

Where can I find a Vietnamese Speaking Notary?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=18816

Is it better to be “bilingual” or speak Spanish?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19264

Share
>

April 22, 2017

How much does a Notary cost?

Many people want to know how much a notary can charge, or what a notary costs?
It depends on whether you want to buy the notary public or rent them. (sorry for the bad joke)

Notary fees are set by the state they are commissioned in. As a general rule a notary can only practice in the state they have their commission in.

Notary fees are normally based on a rate per signature that is notarized (in most states) while in Florida, notary fees are based on a fee for each time the notary’s seal is affixed. Interesting!

Q. What does a mobile notary charge?

A. Mobile Notaries normally charge the state appointed Notary fee in addition to a travel charge and waiting fees if you keep them waiting. Find the best Mobile Notary companies on 123notary.com and look up by zip — but, don’t keep them waiting. Mobile Notaries often do loan signings which are paid based on a fixed negotiated rate. Hospital and Jail signings are normally more expensive than regular traveling notary jobs as more is involved and more can go wrong (especially if the guards aren’t in a good mood.)

Q. What is the maximum fee a notary can charge for notarizing an Acknowledgment or Acknowledged Signature in 2016 or 2017?
A. Please consult our find a notary page and then look up your state

Q. What is the maximum fee a notary can charge for notarizing a Jurat with accompanying Oath in 2016 or 2017?
A. Please consult our find a notary page and then look up your state

Q. What is the maximum charge for a notary in my state?
A. The exact fee depends on the notary act. There are several common types of Notary acts including Acknowledgments, Jurats, Oaths, Depositions, and some states allow witnessing. So please look your state up on our find a notary page.

Please note that there are differences for the Notary acts that each state allows. All states allow Acknowledgments and Jurats, while some states allow obscure Notary acts such as Marine Protests, Proofs of Execution, Safety Deposit Box Openings, etc.

Another great resource might be your state’s Secretary of State Notary Division, as they will have all legal information about the office of notary public in their site.

Find great mobile notaries on 123notary.com! Save time and have a notary public come to your home, office, hospital, or jail cell.

.

You might also like:

How much does a Notary charge (string)
http://blog.123notary.com/?tag=how-much-can-a-notary-charge

Learn about common notary acts
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19500

Where can I find a Spanish speaking Notary?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=18824

Share
>

January 10, 2017

How much does a Notary cost in 2017?

Filed under: Public Interest — Tags: , — admin @ 11:41 pm

How do you find out how much a notary can charge, or what a notary costs?
It depends on whether you want to buy the notary public or rent them. (sorry for the bad joke)

Notary fees are set by the state they are commissioned in. As a general rule a notary can only practice in the state they have their commission in. Notary fees are normally based on a rate per signature that is notarized (in most states) while in Florida, notary fees are based on a fee for each time the notary’s seal is affixed. Interesting!

Q. What is the maximum fee a notary can charge for notarizing an Acknowledgment in 2013 or 2014?
A. Please consult our find a notary page and then look up your state

Q. What is the maximum fee a notary can charge for notarizing a Jurat in 2013 or 2014?
A. Please consult our find a notary page and then look up your state

Q. What is the maximum charge for a notary in my state?
A. The exact fee depends on the notary act, so please look your state up on our find a notary page.

Please note that each state has many types of notary acts that can be charged for ranging fromAcknowledgments (most common) to Jurats (which have an accompanying Oath), Oaths, Affirmations, and more. Some states allow Safety box openings, Protests, Proof of Executions, and other acts. Each state is different.

Another great resource might be your state’s Secretary of State Notary Division, as they will have all legal information about the office of notary public in their site.

Find great mobile notaries on 123notary.com! Save time and have a notary public come to you!

You might also like:

Notary information for beginners — best posts
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=10472

What is a Notary Public?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=6498

Share
>

January 1, 2017

How much do Notaries charge in 2017?

How much do Notaries charge?
How much can a Notary charge?
How much is a Notary?

Each state has a different rate that Notaries can charge for each type of Notary act. In addition to charging officially designated maximum Notary fees, many Notaries on our directory travel to their clients and charge travel fees in addition to waiting fees if you keep them waiting too long. It is common for Notaries to have a fixed price for loan signing packages that range from $75 to $150 per signing which is a price that might include printing eDocuments. But, let’s try to give you a better idea of what particular states offer as Notary fees. Please keep in mind that most states have Notary fees for more than six types of Notary acts while we are only documenting the most common which account for 99% of notary jobs such as Acknowledgments and Jurats and perhaps Oaths.

How much can an Arizona Notary Public charge?
$2 per Acknowledgment (for the first signer)
$2 per Jurat

How much can a California Notary charge?
$10 per Acknolwedged signature
$10 Jurat.

How much can a Florida Notary charge?
$10 per Acknowledgment, however the price is fixed no matter how many signatures are on the notarized document.
$10 per Jurat

How much can an Illinois Notary charge?
$1 per Acknowledged signature
$1 per Jurat

How much can a Maryland Notary charge?
$2 per Acknowledgment
$2 per Jurat

How much can a Michigan Notary charge?
$10 per Jurat
$10 per Acknowledged signature.

How much can a New Jersey Notary charge?
$2.50 per Acknowledgment, Jurat, or Oath

How much can a New York Notary charge?
$2 per Acknowledged signature
$2 per Jurat
$2 for each Sworn Witness

How much can a North Carolina Notary charge?
$5 per principal signature on an Acknowledgment or Jurat.

How much can a Pennsylvania Notary Public charge?
$5 for the first Acknowledged signature and $2 for each subsequent signature.
Jurats are $5 per piece.

How much can a Texas Notary charge?
$6 for the first Acknowledged signature and $1 for each additional
$6 for administering an Oath.

How much can a Virginia Notary Public charge?
$5 for each Acknowledged signature or Jurat.

,

HELP, my state was not on the list…
No problem, just click on the FIND A NOTARY link and look up your state. We have pricing for all states documented in our website.

NOTE: Prices are subject to change. If our pricing has become outdated for any particular state, do not comment on this blog, rather, email us at info@123notary.com and politely inform us of the price change.

.

You might also like:

What is a notary public?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=6498

Best Notary information for beginners
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=10472

All you need to know about getting notary work done
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=2354

What makes a mobile notary a mobile notary?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=8302

.

Share
>

November 2, 2016

How can I get a Spanish language document notarized?

How can I get a Spanish language document notarized?
Some states require that the Notary Public understand the contents of the document. If a document is in Spanish, then some states would require the Notary to be able to read the document in Spanish, etc. Other states require that the Notary speak the language of the signer so that they could have direct communication without the necessity of a translator.

How do I get a Spanish language document notarized?
How do you get a Spanish document notarized? On 123notary.com, you can find Notaries in any state that can notarize any type of document for you including foreign language documents. Just visit the advanced search page and look up by zip code.

California requires direct communication
In California, the Notary must be able to communicate directly with the signer. So, if the signer only speaks Spanish, please make sure your Notary speaks impeccable Spanish.

Immigration Questions
Notaries are not permitted to assist or advise in immigration matters unless they are specifically authorized to do so. Please direct your immigration questions to the proper authorities.

Notaries are generally not Attorneys
Please do not confuse the office of Notary Public with powers associated with Attorneys. In Latin America, a Notario Publico has an elevated position that is similar in many ways to being an Attorney, while in the United States, Notaries can only notarize documents, give Oaths, and not give legal advice. So, please direct your legal questions to a licensed Attorney.

Drafting Documents
Please do not rely on a Notary to draft your documents for you. Notaries are generally not authorized to draft legal documents or advise you on how to draft them. Please have a legal support center or Attorney draft your documents before calling a Notary.

Find a Notary on 123notary.com!
Just visit the advanced search page on 123notary.com and look up by city, county, or zip code. Then, use the Spanish language filter at the top of the search results to filter your results.

You might also like:

How do I find a Spanish speaking notary?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=18824

Identification requirements for being notarized
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=4299

Find a Notary Public on 123notary!
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=4688

Share
>
Older Posts »