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August 22, 2019

He put crazy glue on his thumb

Filed under: Notary Mistakes — admin @ 10:48 pm

If you are in a hurry as a Notary to get the job done and get out, think again. Your job is to deter fraud. In fact, detering fraud is so critical in your Notarial profession, you should be called Fraud-Deteraries (not sure that is a word, I’ll Google it.)

A Notary went to a signing. The signer had put crazy glue on his thumb. Personally, I think that a more professional grade adhesive would have made more sense, but the borrower didn’t google “best adhesives for using during fraudulent notarized signings.” His loss! In any case, putting sarcasm aside, The Notary thumbprinted the signer in their journal (they were in California) didn’t notice that the thumb had no tire tread on it.

Later on, the signer, and the Notary ended up in court as the signer had impersonated a home owner and used fraud to steal or embezzle property from someone else. This would not have happened if the Notary had paid attention to the lack of tread and taken a look or felt the signer’s thumb and said, “something is up!”

However, please be advised that for the elderly, it is common not to have any tread, especially for the 80+ crowd. So, that is normal if there is no wear or tear left on their thumb. But for someone middle aged, that is not acceptable.

Putting crazy glue on your thumb is just plain crazy, but being a notary who is not on the ball is even worse. Stay alert and realize that your job is to prevent crazy people from impersonating others!

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August 11, 2019

Trouble remembering your password?

Filed under: Technical & Legal — admin @ 11:31 pm

Many people lose their passwords on 123notary.com. Here are some ideas for how to resolve that issue.

1. Tattoo the password to your arm. That could create a small issue if you change your password. Just pick a tattoo artist who specializes in touch ups.

2. Create an email file for passwords

3. Write it down on paper and tape it to your desk (or forehead.)

4. Tell your password to your wife.

5. Post your password all over the internet (not recommended).

6. Pick a password you will never forget.

7. Email us when you forget (good idea.)

8. Write the password on a birthday cake, and then don’t eat the cake.

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July 28, 2019

Perhaps Donald Trump will take Notary competency more seriously now that he is affected

Filed under: Notary Mistakes — admin @ 2:19 am

It is now being claimed that Trump never signed a non-disclosure agreement with Stormy Daniels. Due to a botched notarization done by a Notary who received little or no training, a very important business document is now null and void. For years, the various state notary divisions have allowed shoddy Notaries to represent 99.9% of the notary population, and do little or nothing to train or scrutinize them. California does the most, but still 70% of California Notaries that I test cannot and will not administer a correct sounding Oath nor do they think it is important.

The fact remains that if you don’t keep a proper journal, don’t give an Oath, or make a mess of your certificates, you can invalidate the legality of a very critical financial document and that is no joke. The government for decades has behaved like it doesn’t matter and that the Notary profession is one big joke where people should get paid pennies for their work.

Now that the most important man in America has gotten his fingers very badly burned by a typical Notary who was never scrutinized by her State of Texas (which is a state that not only doesn’t teach you how to be a good Notary but prohibits you from inscribing ID serial numbers or taking thumbprints which is the only sure fire way to know a person’s true identity.) The State of Texas allowed this Notary to practice, never checked up on her, and the result is that the President of the United States is now in a lot of trouble. Maybe I should write to Donald and let him know that Notary education is the secret to resolving this problem in the long run. What do you think he will think? I think someone or a lot of someones are about to be fired.

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July 27, 2019

Texas suspends notary who handle Stormy’s hush money

Filed under: Notary Mistakes — admin @ 2:11 am

Stormy Daniels signed a document regarding being paid $130,000 in hush money before the 2016 election. A Texas Notary named Erica Jackson notarized that non-disclosure agreement document concerning the money. But, the State of Texas terminated her Notary commission as a result. The Notary claims she did nothing wrong, yet got canned anyway?

However, the plot thickens. After I watched a video about what had happened, there was a stamp on the signature page, but no notarial certificate verbiage and no notary signature. The notary claimed that the Acknowledgment page which was the third page (that was no longer attached) that stated who was being notarized, etc., was omitted.

Additionally, there was an accusation that the Notary notarized without a signature of the Notary, but the Notary claims that she signed on other pages which were attached.

There was also journal record for the corresponding document, and the journal seemed to have been filled out correctly.

Jeremy’s Comments
If you are a Notary Public, it is quite likely that you could end up on the 6pm national news. So please take your job a little more seriously and get rid of this “I already know it all” attitude, as it is that attitude which prevents you from learning.

This Notary did several things wrong.
1. She stamped the signature page with her Notary seal but omitted Acknowledgment and/or Jurat certificate verbiage. She also omitted a Notary signature to accompany her notary seal which is illegal and she should be terminated if that was the case. It is hard to see what actually happened when you have an inconclusive video.

2. She attached a certificate that was to constitute page three, but that page three ended up missing. Your stamp can not be on page two when the certificate wording is on page three. Those legally have to be on the same page. If the stamp had been on page three where it was supposed to be, she wouldn’t be in a world of trouble.

3. I originally thought (because I prejudged the situation) that the Notary was in trouble because of her association with some dirty business. That was how her improper notarization was discovered, but not why she got in trouble. Interesting in any case.

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June 25, 2019

What is so critical about crossing out the he/she/they?

Filed under: Technical & Legal — admin @ 12:17 pm

FAQ of the day

The he-she-they being filled out is important because if someone fraudulently adds a name to the certificate making the people involved a they and no longer a he or a she, then it makes it a lot easier to make sense of the “he said/she said/they said” that will ensue.

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June 13, 2019

Notarize this page!

Filed under: Technical & Legal — admin @ 8:36 am

You are at a notarization and the instructions say, “Notarize this page.” However, there is no certificate wording on the page. What do you do now? The Notary may not choose the Notary act as that might be construed as UPL. So, just ask the client or signer what act they want and then attach the corresponding certificate to the document. That’s all.

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June 11, 2019

A Los Angeles detective seizes two journals and complains about a blurry thumbprint

Filed under: Notary Mistakes — admin @ 10:14 pm

Yes people, it really happened. A Los Angeles Notary notarized the wrong person. That person was committing some type of fraud. The next thing you know, some detectives were banging on her door. She had to let them have two of her journals. But, that was not good enough for the detectives. They went through a long whining session.

One of the thumbprints taken by the Notary was blurry. How can you do forensics on a blurry thumbprint? Why was that Notary so lazy that they could not take a proper thumbprint? It’s not rocket science — you just push down — and that’s it. Take thumb, press down in ink pad, rise thumb, press straight down on journal thumbprint designated space, feel good, that’s all.

Then on another journal entry, there was no thumbprint, and trust me, the detectives complained a whole lot about that.

So, if you are Notaries and say, “You’re being too picky Jeremy, and besides, my state doesn’t require that.” There are real reasons why I make the recommendations that I do, and it is not just to give you a hard time. You can get in real trouble without thumbprints and proper journal work. Don’t let it happen to you.

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May 30, 2019

What defines what a signature is?

Filed under: Technical & Legal — Tags: — admin @ 10:44 am

I never stopped to think about this until today. What defines a signature? A signature is a type of a mark that is systemically used by a particular individual to identify themselves by name on a document. It is normally a cursive version of their name (do they still teach cursive to the youngins these days?) Some people might print their name in a unique way. Some disabled people might do a signature by x with some subscribing witness. Someone signed using Chinese characters with me as their Notary. And then there are the doctor scribble type signatures too. All of these are acceptable as signatures.

But, how do you know this is their genuine mark? Just check their drivers license and make sure the signature matches up. Sometimes signatures evolve as a person gets older. But the basic stroke style should be about the same. If it doesn’t match up, then you might be at risk notarizing that signature. The signature in Chinese characters I was a little apprehensive or as the Chinese say, “Zhao-ji” about, but I checked the ID and it matched.

In the old days in America, the upper class used to seal deals actually using seals, which is where the expression seems to have come from. They used candle was and a stamp of some sort to seal their business deals on pieces of paper. I saw that in a movie when someone sold a slave.

And in China some people use a square and very intricate seal with four characters on it sometimes written in their antiquated form. They are very beautiful and you can look them up online under the term, “traditional Chinese seal” and then look up images. They could be made from marble or wood, or many types of materials I guess.

But, once I notarized a movie producer from Israel. His signature was some sort of a line with a hook and a dot. He claims he signed million dollar deals with that signature. The only thing I had to say to him was, “You call that a signature?”

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May 26, 2019

X is now a gender and not a generation

Filed under: Technical & Legal — admin @ 10:55 am

The NNA wrote in their blog (and I think this is bad advice by the way) that you should not fill in the he/she/they in California if the gender on the ID says “x”. However, the whole point of the he/she/they is to deter fraud, so by not filling it in, you are inviting fraud (but, without the RSVP card). You no longer know if the person is singular or plural, x-etera. And then asking people to sign next to the “x” presents some other sensitivity issues now doesn’t it. On the other hand, what might make sense is to put in handwriting at the bottom of the acknowledgment that this is a notarization for a single person of gender neutral (or unknown gender) association. That way you have documented the gender and quantity of people. Or, the state could come up with a form that says he/she/x/they which in today’s times makes a lot more “xense.”

When I was growing up there was generation x. Now there is gender-ation x. Boy have things changed. I never thought I would live to see this day. And I have no say in the matter. By the way, I self-identify as being a South African Bushman — is there a spot on the form for that?

It would not surprise me if some millennial came up to one of these transgender people and said, “I self-identify as being a Notary Public.” Do you have a commission? What’s that?

We can change our appearance, but can we change our chromosomes?

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May 24, 2019

What would Ken Edelstein do?

Filed under: Technical & Legal — admin @ 10:57 am

When I have a business problem, I ask, what would Donald Trump do?
When I have a love problem, I ask what our hero from back home in Massachusetts Mark Wahlberg would do?

But, what I have a notarial problem, (or when you do), when you ask your psychic to tune into the universe for answers, who should you channel?

How many notarizations must a man go through.
Before, you call him a man (or a “real notary”.)
How many seas must a sea dog swim (also referred to as a seal)
Before she basks on the beach
Yes, how many times must unpaid notary bills fly
Before those signing companies are forever banned?
The answer my friend is Ken Edelstein — the answer is Kenneth Edelstein.

However, Jeremy is writing this article not Ken. This article is inspired by a blog comment by someone who wanted to know what Ken would do in a particular situation.

So, please write your comments about how to handle particular situations, and in a few months, Ken might write some responses for you, but only if you ask nicely. And one more thing. Ken likes turkeys. I’ve never been able to figure that one out. Maybe it’s a New York thing. Hmmm.

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