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May 19, 2020

Removing shoes to please Asian or Hindu signers. Good idea?

Filed under: Drama & Tragedy — admin @ 9:52 pm

I read a story in Notary Cafe about a Signing Agent who obliged a signer (perhaps Asian as this is their custom in many Asian countries) by taking off their shoes upon request. The Notary inadvertently stepped on a sliver of glass and bled profusely getting her socks all bloody. The limped out of the signing and had to go to urgent care and get three stitches.

I was part of a Hindu meditation group for years and they would bug or nag-tagonize (new word) the hell out of you if you didn’t remove shoes. But, it can be dangerous to remove shoes. I got so sick of the nagging I started yelling at people nag. Nagging seems to be a basic reflex for people from particular cultures and being forcefully dominant towards them is the only way to get them to stop.

You might get some bacteria that could cause serious foot diseases.
There is a story from Yogananda, the Hindi guru that asked people to wear shoes rather than removing them. One American girl who felt it necessary to follow Hindu tradition removed her shoes anyway and got a bad foot disease as a consequence.

You might also step on something or bang your toe on something resulting in an injury.

The narrow minded folks who want to force or coerce you to remove shoes don’t give a damn about your safety or comfort, they only care about their national or religious customs which come before human dignity and all else. Think twice before you endanger yourself to please some nit-picky folks who only care about cleanliness and tradition – there are bigger things at stake.

So, leave your comments below. Remove shoes or don’t remove shoes — and why.

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May 17, 2020

Have you ever been spat on, bitten or yelled at during a signing?

Filed under: Drama & Tragedy — admin @ 9:51 pm

There are so many bad things that happen at signings. I guess I was lucky. I had some rude dog owners, but that was the worst of it. The humans were worse than the annoying dogs.

But, other people had cats bite them, stepped on glass after removing shoes, had dogs bother them, had people pull guns on them, or were yelled at.

What kinds of terrible signing stories do you guys have? Please share as the others would love to know.

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March 20, 2020

Covid19, Panicking, and the Notary Industry

Filed under: Drama & Tragedy — Tags: , — admin @ 8:17 pm

It seems that the Covid 19 virus is hitting America. The numbers keep changing fast as we are testing more people. Honestly, America had two and a half months to prepare for this outbreak and moved slowly. The President downplayed the danger of the disease as well which is dangerous in itself. Now that the disease is off the leash in America, we are starting to realize that perhaps we should learn from particular Asian countries on how to get a handle on this problem. Testing likely suspects in mass is a big part of it. But, what about Notaries, what should your concerns and actions be?

Be Prepared
It is a problem that people are panicking. This results in unstable business decisions. It also results in stores being sold out of face masks (not a problem in my area yet), hand sanitizer, paper towels, bottled water, and water filters. It makes sense to have a supply at home because these items sell out quickly. I was lucky and got some paper towels and water today which is March 10th although I might not publish this article for a while.

The Stock Market
Stocks are plummeting in value. I understand that cruise and airline stocks should lose some intrinsic value due to this disease. But, banks should not be too affected by this problem, yet their stocks are dipping just as badly as airlines. Even Coca Cola which is a very stable company has lost a lot of ground and they are one of the most stable stocks that exist.

Your Behavior
I heard that the refinance marked spiked and then the phones stopped ringing in the last few days. Interest rates are low and could get lower as the global economy is slowing down due to the disease and due to the trade war between the USA and China. This means more refinances. However, if people are afraid to go to work or leave the house, that means there might not be any business for Notaries. Very few people are infected in America at this point and it does not make sense to avoid leaving the house at this stage. Once we get into late April or May then it might be a much more serious situation and you might face immediate risk.

The 18 Month Rule
Some people have decided to shut down schools or not go to work. Newsflash – pandemics like the Spanish Flu, Swine Flu, and Covid 19 typically last 18 months or longer. So, if you have decided that shutting down your school or playing hookey on work makes sense, ask yourself if you can afford to continue that behavior for 18 months. Sure, if there is an acute outbreak in your particular area, then cancelling school makes sense. But, now, there are only three areas in the USA where it makes sense to cancel school.

The Elderly
If you are 60 or over, or have a lung condition it makes sense not to get on an airplane, cruise ship, go to the movies, go to a convention, or be anywhere where you will be in close proximity to large quantities of humans, especially if the ventilation is anything other than clean air.

My recommendations
I am not a doctor, but I think stocking up on some food and supplies makes sense at this point because the shelves at your supermarket could end up stripped bare at some point. It makes sense to wash your hands regularly with soap and disinfect surfaces in your house regularly. It makes sense to avoid crowds if you can. But, you need to go to work unless there is some pressing reason why you wouldn’t. If you are sick, elderly, or there is an outbreak in your city you might stop going to work for a while. If you are able to work from home that is great and recommended. But, if you have to work at an office, take some vitamin C and hope for the best. You can’t just end your life before it is over.

Loan Signings
Don’t be afraid to do loan signings. There is a chance that the signers could be infected, but a very small chance at this point. Stay six feet away from them and make sure they don’t sneeze on you. Disinfect the table with wipes or lysol. You might check with the borrowers by phone to see if they are coughing or sneezing. Take some vitamin C and garlic and hope for the best. We cannot just shut down society at this point because there is a tiny risk of exposure.

What should the government do?
We should test all those with symptoms in a very efficient way. We should test all that have come into contact with diagnosed individuals. It might also make sense to test all who live in areas with high rates of infections. There is a pecking order for who should be tested. Because if we don’t identify individuals who have the disease, we will eventually have to quarantine all of society at least in particular areas which will be devastating for the economy.

Summary
It is unclear how this disease will affect the notary industry. Personally, I think it will help us with loan signings, and I think the danger to Notaries doing signings is minuscule. Even if your a borrower from time to time has the disease, you are not likely to get it if you take precautions. Continue living your life and take necessary precautions unless you are elderly or have lung issues in which case — alter your life now!

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January 22, 2020

The Notary with Cleavage

Filed under: Drama & Tragedy — admin @ 10:39 am

Yes, this is a true story. I did not meet the notary myself. But, someone on my directory did. The person on my directory needed to be notarized. And as you know, a notary cannot notarize themselves even if they have dual personality disorder, or rather, especially if they have a multiple personality disorder (they should put that one in the handbook — I’ll write to the Sec of State.)

There is a Notary who is very busy who goes to appointments showing lots of cleavage. She hands out a black and pink business card at the end of appointments. I wonder if she bends over in front of the client while affixing her stamp.

I’m not sure if this is a good business strategy or not. I think if you have mortgage company clients, they might complain if you are too sexy. We had a complaint about one of our clients up North who wore her disco outfit to a signing. But, for what Carmen and I call, “General notary work” where you just notarize a document or two for an individual, this dress code might be okay, especially if you have male clients.

I remember fifteen years ago we had a sixty year old client who promoted herself by saying, “Call me if you want a beautiful blond to notarize you.” I guess at sixty, some ladies still got it.

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January 17, 2020

Notarization for a guy who pulls a gun

Filed under: Drama & Tragedy — admin @ 9:30 am

A client of mine in New Jersey tells this harrowing tale about doing a cash-out job in Patterson.

The Notary enters the house. The borrower calls his wife a crack ho. They go to the car to do the signing. The borrower pulls a gun, points it at the Notary and says, “You aren’t going to mess with me man!” The Notary said, “I’m just here to sign papers.” Then the Notary got a job signing for a paraplegic. The Notary asked how the signer was going to sign. The signer asked the notary to put the pen in his mouth.

After that, the Notary got a call to go to Karen Johnson’s house. He gets to the house and the woman loudly says, “What the hell is going on?” It was Whoopi Goldberg using her real name.

So, I guess that Notary had fun notarizing celebrities, but not as much fun as I had notarizing an arsonist and his jurors — not that I am trying to be one-up on him!

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January 1, 2020

Robbing the dead — Notary style

Filed under: Drama & Tragedy — admin @ 11:06 pm

Yes, it is a common crime in Philadelphia as I am reading. People falsify deeds, and rob the dead of their property. This requires the use of a Notary or fake Notary or falsified Notary seals.

https://www.inquirer.com/news/house-theft-deeds-fraud-forgery-philadelphia-20190603.html

A new local law requiring photos of ID’s being used seems like a prudent step. Another tell-tale sign is a long gap between the signing of a document and its recording. Notaries are also checked by phone to make sure particular transactions are legitimate. Taking thumbprints of sellers has been proposed in Philadelphia, but not implemented yet. It is hard to forge a thumbprint and that seems like a very sensible fraud deterrent to me. There are other ways to regulate fraud, but those are a few main ones. Read the article for more information.

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Can a notary go to jail for notary fraud?
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Penalties for notary misconduct, fraud, and failure of duty.
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=21315

The curse of the notary mummy
blog.123notary.com/?p=19918

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November 20, 2019

Your notary stole your private information and sold it.

Filed under: Drama & Tragedy — admin @ 5:50 am

Good God! Did this really happen? I don’t know. How would you know? But, imagine that it did.

Let’s say a Notary came to your house and took all of your social security information and other information from the loan application. There is a lot of sensitive information there.

Or perhaps the notary went to the bathroom, rummaged through your house and came up with some sensitive information. You might not find out right away. But, later on you might be a victim of identity theft. What a nightmare. Is there a way to protect yourself from your Notary? Should you even be concerned?

Honestly, this is the last thing you should worry about. The worst I have heard a Notary do is to not show up, leave you high and dry, be rude, or steal your oxy-codene (which is a serious crime.) If a Notary stole your morphene, then you wouldn’t have it at your most anxious moment — anxious because someone stole your morphene. That sounds like an oxymoron. Okay, the morphene theft not so much but the oxy-codene theft could sound like an oxymoron.

Another piece of information the notary has is your loan terms. He could try to sell the borrower a competitive product based on the private information he is privy to.

So, don’t lose sleep over this issue. It was an interesting issue to discuss. Let us know if you have any input.

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If you are named as an identity theft conspirator, you might owe $20,000 in legal fees
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19481

10 risks of being a notary public
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June 17, 2019

Some folks feel more relaxed with a strange female in their house than a man

Filed under: Drama & Tragedy — admin @ 10:17 pm

Do you feel more comfortable with a strange female in your house than a strange man? All I want to know is how strange are we talking about? Tongue piercings, neck tattoos, spiked hair? It can get pretty strange. Oh, no, that’s not what I meant by strange, I meant a woman who you didn’t know from before….. Oh, now I see. I think that women are universally seen as being less threatening, unless you live near a college campus with a large feminist following (and most of them do.) But, putting feminists aside (and I put them aside as much as humanly possible) I think that biologically, women are less likely to commit crimes, or physically harm someone, and try harder to get along with people than men. Although female cats may be the exception to this rule, maybe I’ve been scratched one too many times, but I digress.

Is it that women are often more personable, or is it that they are less threatening? Is it their more agreeable demeanor? What is it about women that men and women both like. Are women more gentle? A lot of time cats prefer to be held by women humans simply because women are more gentle, and they like it if you talk to them in a squeaky voice too which women do quite well (and so do I.) Women don’t think it is very masculine of me to talk to animals in a squeaky voice, but then, if I do so, I am not trying to impress the human ladies, but the animals with what a kind and wonderful human friend I am.

When all is said and done, I think it depends on the individual who I would like to have in my house. But, I would agree with the others that I would prefer to have a lady visiting my house as a general rule, providing she is not a UCLA student.

You might also like:

Best ways female notaries can protect themselveshttp://blog.123notary.com/?p=19196

Millennial Notaries and gender rules
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22535

The new acknowledgment for transgender people
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19658

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June 14, 2017

Murder in a building a week before the signing

Filed under: Drama & Tragedy,Popular on Facebook (some) — admin @ 8:58 am

A Notary was called to do a signing in a building that had experienced a murder. The Notary declined the job and claimed that the signing company was putting her in danger by sending her to the scene of the murder. Whose responsibility is it anyway?

Personally, I feel that since the murder already happened that the danger is over. I walked through fields in the South where horrible battles had taken place 150 years ago. Once again, the danger is over, although there might be a few lost souls who hang out there because the angels never rounded them up after they died. I’m not sure how that works.

So, should the signing company safeguard the Notary from going to a “dangerous place?” There is no official definition of a dangerous place unless the department of state recommends you don’t go to a particular country like Mexico or Afghanistan. Murders happen everywhere. I live in a good area and we had two murders within blocks in the last twelve years.

I think that an area where there are felons hanging out or regular problems could be informally defined as “dangerous.” But, one isolated event happening a week prior doesn’t phase me.

This reminds me of some woods near my house where a girl was raped 40 years ago. The residents became very cautious after the rape. I think their timing was wrong. They should have been careful BEFORE the rape. Women need to be careful in general, especially in isolated areas. This type of caution is like putting your seat belt on after the accident. The seat belt will do you more good if you put it on right before the accident — or better yet, always take precautions.

But, I don’t see anything dangerous about accepting this Notary job. In general in life, my friend Vasu always says that in the end — it is about trusting your instincts. And if you don’t have instincts, then hire someone who does!

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Louisiana notary murdered in home invasion
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Psych Episode: Busting the Russian Mafia with help of a Notary!
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19963

Compilation of Mafia related posts
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20352

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February 12, 2017

Racial issues at a signing

Filed under: Drama & Tragedy,Popular on Twitter — admin @ 9:36 pm

Shelly went to a Notary signing. The minute she arrived, she could feel extreme tension. The husband was listed as an entity on the loan application, but the wife was the one taking command. Shelly was (and still is) white, and the couple was black. I’ve done hundreds of signings in black homes and without issue — however, those signings were done before people had a reaction to Donald Trump’s political presence.

Racism was at an all-time low from around 1997 to mid 2015. And then it started up again. There were more protests, riots, clash between minorities and police, the Black Lives Matter movement, etc. But, during the last few months of 2016 it turned violent. I witnessed people being beaten in the street over race — strangers beating strangers with no provocation. Can we blame Donald Trump for this insanity? After all, he has done nothing to anyone (yet) and was only speaking his mind in his own non-sugar coated way.

The husband and wife started going through the Loan Estimate. They went through every fact and figure with a fine toothed comb because they had prejudged that something must be wrong and that everybody was out to get them including the Notary, Lender, Donald Trump, Title, Escrow, and Sam down at the butcher shop (I made the last part up.) They were basically trying to confirm their baseless suspicions by finding something wrong with the paperwork.

When the Notary tried to smooth things over, the couple called the Loan Officer and commented about how terrible the Notary was. The Loan Officer failed to return the Notary’s calls but called the party that hired them for the loan (whomever that was.) The Notary’s reputation had been slandered, tarnished, and she didn’t want to lose her client. Shelly’s reputation was on the line here for a crime she didn’t commit. Was racism to blame?

Shelly comments that if people are negative about the process from the getgo, they will create problems that weren’t there in the first place. Too true Shelly. I agree completely. But, the main thing is to stay out of the loan. The loan is not your business. It is not up to the Notary to determine if there is something wrong with the loan. You just make sure they sign where they are supposed to and notarize the signatures.

Shelly has signed hundreds of loans for people of all communities in her area and treats people equally. It looks like she was not treated equally in return this time.

The moral of the story is, if you walk into a tense situation as a Notary — just do your job and don’t make comments. Be neutral. It’s not your problem. If someone fires you for reasons beyond your control, just state your side of the story and it is their loss if they lose you because you are a good Notary who did nothing wrong and has a 99.9% accuracy rate (or so you claim.)

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Black Notaries vs. White Notaries — comedy edition
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=17455

Demographics in the Mobile Notary business
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=15359

I’d rather stop being a Notary than carry a gun
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=15896

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