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June 17, 2019

Some folks feel more relaxed with a strange female in their house than a man

Filed under: Drama & Tragedy — admin @ 10:17 pm

Do you feel more comfortable with a strange female in your house than a strange man? All I want to know is how strange are we talking about? Tongue piercings, neck tattoos, spiked hair? It can get pretty strange. Oh, no, that’s not what I meant by strange, I meant a woman who you didn’t know from before….. Oh, now I see. I think that women are universally seen as being less threatening, unless you live near a college campus with a large feminist following (and most of them do.) But, putting feminists aside (and I put them aside as much as humanly possible) I think that biologically, women are less likely to commit crimes, or physically harm someone, and try harder to get along with people than men. Although female cats may be the exception to this rule, maybe I’ve been scratched one too many times, but I digress.

Is it that women are often more personable, or is it that they are less threatening? Is it their more agreeable demeanor? What is it about women that men and women both like. Are women more gentle? A lot of time cats prefer to be held by women humans simply because women are more gentle, and they like it if you talk to them in a squeaky voice too which women do quite well (and so do I.) Women don’t think it is very masculine of me to talk to animals in a squeaky voice, but then, if I do so, I am not trying to impress the human ladies, but the animals with what a kind and wonderful human friend I am.

When all is said and done, I think it depends on the individual who I would like to have in my house. But, I would agree with the others that I would prefer to have a lady visiting my house as a general rule, providing she is not a UCLA student.

You might also like:

Best ways female notaries can protect themselveshttp://blog.123notary.com/?p=19196

Millennial Notaries and gender rules
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22535

The new acknowledgment for transgender people
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19658

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June 14, 2017

Murder in a building a week before the signing

Filed under: Drama & Tragedy,Popular on Facebook (very) — admin @ 8:58 am

A Notary was called to do a signing in a building that had experienced a murder. The Notary declined the job and claimed that the signing company was putting her in danger by sending her to the scene of the murder. Whose responsibility is it anyway?

Personally, I feel that since the murder already happened that the danger is over. I walked through fields in the South where horrible battles had taken place 150 years ago. Once again, the danger is over, although there might be a few lost souls who hang out there because the angels never rounded them up after they died. I’m not sure how that works.

So, should the signing company safeguard the Notary from going to a “dangerous place?” There is no official definition of a dangerous place unless the department of state recommends you don’t go to a particular country like Mexico or Afghanistan. Murders happen everywhere. I live in a good area and we had two murders within blocks in the last twelve years.

I think that an area where there are felons hanging out or regular problems could be informally defined as “dangerous.” But, one isolated event happening a week prior doesn’t phase me.

This reminds me of some woods near my house where a girl was raped 40 years ago. The residents became very cautious after the rape. I think their timing was wrong. They should have been careful BEFORE the rape. Women need to be careful in general, especially in isolated areas. This type of caution is like putting your seat belt on after the accident. The seat belt will do you more good if you put it on right before the accident — or better yet, always take precautions.

But, I don’t see anything dangerous about accepting this Notary job. In general in life, my friend Vasu always says that in the end — it is about trusting your instincts. And if you don’t have instincts, then hire someone who does!

.

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Louisiana notary murdered in home invasion
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=925

Psych Episode: Busting the Russian Mafia with help of a Notary!
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19963

Notarizing a female accessory to murder
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=8667

Compilation of Mafia related posts
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20352

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February 12, 2017

Racial issues at a signing

Filed under: Drama & Tragedy — admin @ 9:36 pm

Shelly went to a Notary signing. The minute she arrived, she could feel extreme tension. The husband was listed as an entity on the loan application, but the wife was the one taking command. Shelly was (and still is) white, and the couple was black. I’ve done hundreds of signings in black homes and without issue — however, those signings were done before people had a reaction to Donald Trump’s political presence.

Racism was at an all-time low from around 1997 to mid 2015. And then it started up again. There were more protests, riots, clash between minorities and police, the Black Lives Matter movement, etc. But, during the last few months of 2016 it turned violent. I witnessed people being beaten in the street over race — strangers beating strangers with no provocation. Can we blame Donald Trump for this insanity? After all, he has done nothing to anyone (yet) and was only speaking his mind in his own non-sugar coated way.

The husband and wife started going through the Loan Estimate. They went through every fact and figure with a fine toothed comb because they had prejudged that something must be wrong and that everybody was out to get them including the Notary, Lender, Donald Trump, Title, Escrow, and Sam down at the butcher shop (I made the last part up.) They were basically trying to confirm their baseless suspicions by finding something wrong with the paperwork.

When the Notary tried to smooth things over, the couple called the Loan Officer and commented about how terrible the Notary was. The Loan Officer failed to return the Notary’s calls but called the party that hired them for the loan (whomever that was.) The Notary’s reputation had been slandered, tarnished, and she didn’t want to lose her client. Shelly’s reputation was on the line here for a crime she didn’t commit. Was racism to blame?

Shelly comments that if people are negative about the process from the getgo, they will create problems that weren’t there in the first place. Too true Shelly. I agree completely. But, the main thing is to stay out of the loan. The loan is not your business. It is not up to the Notary to determine if there is something wrong with the loan. You just make sure they sign where they are supposed to and notarize the signatures.

Shelly has signed hundreds of loans for people of all communities in her area and treats people equally. It looks like she was not treated equally in return this time.

The moral of the story is, if you walk into a tense situation as a Notary — just do your job and don’t make comments. Be neutral. It’s not your problem. If someone fires you for reasons beyond your control, just state your side of the story and it is their loss if they lose you because you are a good Notary who did nothing wrong and has a 99.9% accuracy rate (or so you claim.)

You might also like:

Black Notaries vs. White Notaries — comedy edition
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=17455

Demographics in the Mobile Notary business
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=15359

I’d rather stop being a Notary than carry a gun
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=15896

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January 29, 2017

Black vs. White Notaries = benign, but the comments were hateful

I live in a multi-racial neighborhood. We have Hindus, Muslims, Jews, Buddhists, and even a few Christians (when we allow them to come in). We have black, white, yellow, brown, red, and even a few green people who fly in from time to time when their spaceship breaks down.

People on TV can joke about race. Eddie Griffin does so unashamably, so does Eddie Murphy, and a few other Eddies. How come they can exercise their freedom of speech without a hateful backlash? Have you ever thought about the double standard I am talking about here? I joke about everything. I value my freedom of speech too. But, the commentary to my Black Notaries vs. White Notaries was just hateful considering my blog entry was gentle and not demeaning to anyone. We (my comedy writer & I) joked about the same things black comedians joke about. Do I have to get a race change and be a Michael Jackson in reverse to have cultural permission to do the same thing?

The reality of the race situation is that law enforcement and young black males are having a prolonged and unofficial civil war. This is more than unpleasant. It is dangerous for all of us all even though most of us are bystanders. I have read that many higher level rabble rousers are arranging for more violent riots. Violence and hateful commentary on my blog doesn’t solve anything — it just creates more tension and more problems. Perhaps these hostile comments I received reflect the very attitude why we are having a serious problem with race in America. America practices racism, accuses everybody in sight of being racist, yet we lack the ability to have an open and honest discussion about race, culture, or just tell a few jokes.

Some Americans get almost violent when you bring up particular topics. This attitude is a direct threat to our freedom of expression which our forefathers risked or gave their lives for. If you react so violently to harmless jokes, perhaps that is a reflection of your own inability to accept America’s racial situation for what it is. We are forced to live in it daily, but culturally prevented from saying anything open about it. Should you send ABC or the New York Times hate mail every time they publish a piece on race?

It is amazing that a blog article so harmless got such a hateful response. I think that some of you need to take a closer look at yourselves. On the brighter side, that post was one of our most popular comedy posts ever, and people referred it to their friends since they were so shocked. The bottom line is that I can joke about whatever I like, and you can be polite about it — can you dig it?

Please also see:

Black Notaries vs. White Notaries — comedy edition
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=17455

Comedy Central Notary Roast
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=17462

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March 24, 2016

Two guys with the same name; One cashed the other guy’s check!

Imagine your worst nightmare. Someone else with your same name. But, it’s not identity fraud if the person really is you, or at least shares your name. We had a Notary in Alabama and another Notary in Indiana who had this exact situation. I am not sure if their middle initial or middle name is the same, but the first and last were. They were both on the same database for several signing companies. The problem was that the guy in Alabama did a bunch of jobs for several signing companies, and then the guy in Indiana got paid for those jobs — and deposited the checks.

I actually personally know both of these people and remember a conversation I had with one of them three years ago. He thought his bill was too high and kept saying, Jeremy…. Jeremy…. Jeremy…. Jeremy… with this amazing tonality. He got removed from his high position because it was too much trouble to bill him. Now he has a free listing at the bottom of the list. He might not get that many jobs down there, but if he can get paid for the other guy’s jobs in Alabama, I guess it all works out just fine — for the mean time!

In any case, let this be a lesson to be learned. If you have children, and you have one of those standard type names like Jack Smith, or David Rutherford, consider a name change. Either change your last name, or name your children something that nobody else would name their kids such as Bullwinkle, Shakazulu, or Pleiades! Think in the future, and pick a name that is out of this world, or at least out of this constellation!

.

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Two notaries assigned the same job?
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January 28, 2016

I’d rather stop being a Notary than carry a gun

Notaries have very conflicting attitudes about carrying guns. Some are violently against it, while others just see guns as a fact of life. For people growing up in Haiti or Israel, there are people with machine guns everywhere. It is just a fact of life. But for Americans, guns are not so common unless you are a gangster, or drive a pick up truck in a red state. So, how can Notaries defend themselves?

(1) Some Notaries let their husband know where they will be and to call the police if they don’t hear back from them by a particular time.

(2) Other Notaries carry pepper spray. Pepper spray is nice because you don’t do any real harm to the victim. It is not expensive, and not difficult to use. Additionally, you can use it on dogs. In my experience, dogs are more of a realistic threat to Notaries (and mailmen) than humans

(3) Some Notaries always place themselves between the signer and the door so they can run if the going gets rough. You would be surprised how much anger the APR can cause!

(4) At 123notary, we recommend getting advanced training in Okinawan Japanese style Notary-jitsu. Notary-jitsu teaches you how to defend yourselves from the tactics of violent borrowers. You learn to protect yourself from knife attacks, beatings, and small dogs that say “yap.” Yes, this all-inclusive training could save not only your life, but your dignity.

(5) Having a gun. Guns are dangerous. If you use a gun, you will end up in court, and possibly in jail. I am not convinced that having a gun is a good idea, however, in dangerous areas, you might not have a choice. Even in “safe” areas, you could encounter trouble at any time. There are many psycho people out there. They don’t come out all at once — only when you are not expecting it. For some reason, our local taco place has the nicest employees, but the freakiest customers. I have had to call the police once, and on another occassion a woman was beaten so that the thief could steal her mobile phone and then casually walk away — not run, but walk away.

A gun could save your life in an emergency, but pulling a gun could also get you shot. If you can’t pull your gun in time, the gun won’t save you either. Or if someone has you at gunpoint, it is too late to draw. It is up to you to figure out what to do.

(6) Bringing a large flashlight
I used to have a huge flashlight with me when I was doing pizza delivery back in the day. Military flashlights are the only method for being able to read the numbers on someone’s house. They can also be used as a weapon. I used such a weapon to kill once. Don’t get your hopes up, the victim was a rat, not a human. The rat had invaded my bedroom and jumped into bed with me and then ran away. I cornered it and herioically bludgeoned it with a bash to its head. It was all over in a second. He/she felt no pain.

(7) If you were Crocodile Dundee you would bring a huge knife to the signing table. If the signer offered you an apple and was cutting it with a knife, you could say, “That’s not a knife — THIS is a knife!”

It is up to you what types of weapons you use. In my opinion, all women should know some type of self defence. If someone has you from behind, you should know how to stamp on their food and elbow them. You never know when trouble will come, but you should be ready.

.

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Compilation of mafia related notary posts
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20352

Psych: busting the Russian Mafia with help of a Notary
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November 5, 2015

Have you ever been tempted not to go into a borrower’s house?

We are all under pressure to make a living and please our clients. But, sometimes you have to use common sense as well. Notaries are called to do signings regularly. You don’t know the condition of the house or neighborhood until you get there.

If George Carlin were a Notary, he would say that going to notary jobs in decrepid homes makes you feel good twice. When you accept the notary job you say, “I’m making money.” When you open the front door and run for your life you get to feel good a second time and say, “I’m saving my life!”

By the way, how’d you like to be a leftover? If they were taking people out to be shot I wouldn’t mind. I might even volunteer! Sorry, my childhood memories of Carlin’s tape stuck in my brain I guess.

Anyway, we have a story about a notary who knew Carmen. This took place years ago. She went into a house that was so filthy, she contracted a serious bacterial infection and had to be quarantined in the hospital. It was like having Ebola. It was called Legionaire’s disease and it was life threatening.

Other times, the house has rats, or other unclean animals running around. Sometimes it is the humans who give you the creeps. Carmen did a job years ago for some guy with long toe nails. Every time he walked around you would hear the click click click of his toenails.

Don’t feel bad by refusing to go into a house. You might be saving your life, sanity, or well-being. Just Google your nearest Starbucks and request that the signing is done there.

.

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The lady and the handwritten will (her house was a complete mess)
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=3609

Borrowers and their filthy homes
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=2214

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February 16, 2013

Why Notaries Don’t Last

Filed under: Drama & Tragedy — Tags: , , — admin @ 11:59 pm

Why Notaries Don’t Last: DO Something

Some of our notaries invariably give up because they are tired–or get tired because they have given up–on themselves. They seem to feel that just being listed on a database–without really trying to say anything intriguing in the Notes section or give any details on why they should be hired over other notaries–is all they have to do. Then, they have a few companies who pay them too little, ask them to drive too far… or do not pay them at all.

One notary whose Notes section says virtually nothing reported he does not get any work– or does not get paid when he does take on work! He told me, “I have become a target for morons. Everyone who calls me wants me to do a job 100 miles away for next to nothing.” Well–if he takes the job–and continues taking jobs from a company that does not pay him–just who is the moron?

A top title company owner recently told me, “I like it when notaries tell right at the beginning of their Notes how many loans they have signed. Years as a notary does not tell me how many loans they have signed or anything about them.”

I understand that inexperienced notaries must start somewhere, and do not feel they have anything to say to promote themselves. But be pro-active and look at a few other listings to see what notaries say in their Notes sections. Don’t just sit there, waiting for the phone to ring. YES: companies DO read your Notes…particularly the opening lines, which become the thumbnail for the search results. The best companies will not hire a notary who has errors in the Notes, by the way. Also, if all you say at the beginning is “Hi, my name is Benny,” you are wasting good space. Open with your # of loans signed and follow with a description that will make me want to call you. Tell us about your technology, memberships, and degrees. Read on.

A few tips to avoid burnout or getting burned:
> Think about whatever there is in your experience and background that makes you detail-oriented, reliable, and punctual. Tell us THAT–instead of just listing adjectives. For example, if you have a degree or experience in accounting– Say! For example: “MA in Marketing, 10 years in accounting: I prepare every loan as if it were my own tax return.”
> Update your Notes and # of loans signed frequently. As you gain experience, take a look at your Notes. Add any degrees or info that would help someone choose you.
> Find a few companies to write positive reviews of your notary work. Companies trust notaries with a few reviews. If someone has hired you–let that company write a brief review, and use that review to get more work. Or maybe someone you did a routine notarization for will write a review. Right above your name on your notary page is the link to send someone to write a review. Reviews work: http://blog.123notary.com/?p=3902
> Get the 123 certification. Companies know our test is timed and focused, and you will get more calls if you are certified plus have good Notes…and a few reviews. This is just what the stats show about who gets work on 123notary. Those who get our certification move way ahead quickly. It’s just a fact.
> USE 123notary to the max: in the upper right corner of the home page, there is a link you can click on: signing company lists. Check out which ones have good reviews and PAY well…and market yourself to them after you have updated your Notes. You will be pleasantly surprised.
> If you are doing all these things–you will have much more confidence on the phone when someone calls you.

Take a few hours a week and try at least one of these strategies. Before you become bitter because no one calls you or pays you– take a look at what you can do to stand out.

You might also like:

Experienced notaries are being weeded out of the industry
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16747

Best blog articles for advanced Notaries
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=14736

I’m a high end notary in a low ball world
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22263

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August 17, 2012

Stealing a Business Name

Stealing a business name 

One of our notaries was accused of stealing someone’s business name.  The notary went to a signing and said she was associated with some other gentleman with a particular name. I don’t remember the name, and would be confidential in any case.  The client was having some paperwork notarized that would be used to register a company name in Wyoming
 
I couldn’t figure this situation out, so I emailed the client, and they said that the notary name was registered the next day by the friend of the notary, but not the notary themselves.  They registered his business name before he could register it.  Why would someone go out of their way to steal someone else’s business name?  This poor client had already printed out business cards and mailing labels with his future business name, and now he couldn’t register it.
 
What a sad story.  The moral of the story is don’t print your cards until your business name registration is complete.  Someone else can register that name up to seconds right before you attempt to!!!

Notaries are encouraged to register their business names, and get a business license. Notaries with official business names get considerably more business than those that don’t have a notary business name!

Tweets:
(1) One of our notaries was accused of stealing a signer’s business name right before it got registered!
(2) One of our notaries registered a clients’ business name 24 hours before the client went to register it.

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Compilation of posts about notary business names
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=21760

Funny sounding business names: Grandma’s notary service & more!
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Notary business names
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=2302

Business Cards for notaries
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=36

Business Licenses
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=742

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February 6, 2012

Fraud & Forgery related to the notary profession

Fraud and Forgery in the notary business 

There are many types of fraud that a notary might run into in their notarial career, forgery being one of the more common types of fraud. But, let’s take a closer look at what specific types of things could happen.
 
(1) Someone could forge your seal and pretend to be you.  It happened to me.  Unfortunately for them, they didn’t forge my signature very well, and didn’t copy my style of embossing every page either.  Putting technicalities aside, I bet they were not able to forge my quirky sense of humor either.  Notary seal forgery is not common. In my case, I think they used a really good photocopier.  BTW, a photocopier can NOT copy the RAISED impression of an inkless embossed seal which is why I used it on all of my notarizations.
 
(2) Page swapping — the old bait and switch routine.  I got called to notarize many multi-page documents. I put my embossing seal through all of the pages leaving a raised impression on each page.  I usually did these individually. Sometimes it is better to do all pages together so the seal goes through the same location in each page.  However, the seal comes out more clearly if you go page by page.  In any case, if you see a ten page document where all of the pages EXCEPT for page four are embossed, that would raise my eyebrows.  I have had many situations, where the signer wants me to give them another acknowledgment certificate for a new page they are adding to the document. I tell them that I have to notarize their signature ALL OVER AGAIN, and that is the law no matter how many times you say, “Oh, come on”.  With that attitude you might as well notarize your own signature as a non-notary!
 
(3) Title companies have a common practice of initialing for the borrower if the borrower misses an initial. It is “easier” than sending the documents back to the borrower.  Whether it is signature forgery to forge initials is a matter for an attorney to decide, but it seems pretty illegal to me to engage in initial forgery. I don’t think that anyone audits loan documents to see if anyone is engaging in initial forgery, but perhaps they should — many Title companies might get busted or investigated at a minimum.
 
(4) Refusal to be thumbprinted?  You must be up to something if you don’t want your thumbprint recorded. Maybe you have a fake identification card, right?  You can fake an ID, but you can not fake a thumbprint.
 
(5) Signature forgery.  If someone forged a signature on a document, they will have to have a fake ID and forge the same signature on the ID and in your journal. It would be a tough crime to pull off. I think that nobody in their right mind would attempt this.  Normally, people try to do crimes of fraud in private, and wouldn’t be willing to let other parties see what they are doing, no matter what!
 
(6) Notarizing out of state?  If you don’t have a commission in a particular state, you can not notarize there, with a few exceptions. Military notaries have special rules. A Virginia notary public may notarize out of the state of Virginia, but only for documents that are to be recorded within the state of Virginia. In any case, from time to time we will hear rumors that a notary public is operating illegally in a bordering state where they are not commissioned, and people want us to enforce the rule. I tell them to report the individual to the state notary division where the Notary in question is commissioned.
 
(7) Charging more than the state maximum notary fees is illegal, and charging more travel fee than your state allows (roughly eight states have restrictions for travel fees) can get you in trouble too.
 
(8) Filling out an Acknowledgment or Jurat form when you never saw the signer and never had the signer sign your journal is a really serious act of notarial misconduct.  You can lose your commission and get fined or jailed for this.

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Free valid and phony government issued photo ID
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=2219

Backdating from A to Z
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=2424

Notarizing multi-page documents
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=21423

Penalties for notary misconduct, fraud and failure of duty
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=21315

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