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December 30, 2020

Stand Out From the Notary Crowd

Filed under: Ken Edelstein — admin @ 12:52 pm

Landing New Clients
Surprise, you have a lot of competition. Some of them are willing to accept lowball offers that actually cost money to process – what are they thinking (possibly unable to do math?). So, to “break thru” you need to be noticed. Many of the most basic items are covered already; your business name, a well written profile (with an “eye catcher” first line), BBB accreditation, and some positive reviews from past clients. But, there is so much more that you can do to stand out.

Do you stand on the shore and mumble “here fish, fish, fish; come to me”? Of course not, to catch a fish you have to go where they are and have proper gear and great bait. Well, your prospective clients are not fish, nor to you plan to “bait & catch” them. But, you certainly want those soon to be clients to call. Go to them; give them a look see of you, and a business card. Of course you cannot visit the world, so Advertise. Being high up on directories is a great start, with some well written bio information (not self praise). Write as if you were talking to a friend, not to a want to be employer. It doesn’t hurt to add as “bait” an uncommon offer. “I process a duplicate copy of your document at no additional charge because that gives you backup in case the one you ship never arrives”. Or, “On my first visit you will receive a 25% off coupon valid for my next two visits”. Feeling brave? “If I am over 15 minutes late the fee is half of agreement”.

Your Interaction with Prospective and Prior Clients
Read the articles on proper phone answering! Stop saying “Hello”. Better is “Good Morning, your name, how can I help you? Then, listen, really listen. If you know something relevant, that the caller is unlikely to know – offer that information – even if it causes you, on this call; to lose the assignment. It’s (in the long run) a better strategy to be helpful rather than deceitful. They will remember you for honesty and being a source of accurate and relevant information. Be sure to get the what, when and where information prior to any fee discussion. Don’t waste much time if a minnow is calling offering a low ball.

You have a great chance to make a positive impression with the written word. Do you include a .vcf file so they can add you to their electronic database? One of my “secrets” is to often include an appropriate image with emails. Not something extolling me – rather something with a bit of humor or informative. I have a large collection of graphics. A few lawyer cartoons, a rose, an elaborate thank you graphic; build up a collection. Humor is always an appreciated break from the routine. Many are the replies: “Thank You, I need a laugh”. Unsaid: “I will remember you”.

Keep the Clients you have Happy
Be real. Don’t be afraid to actually ask a favor. Perhaps 2PM would be a tight schedule; “can we make that 3PM – so I can be sure to be on time”? Giving someone a dollar on departure, as a gift would certainly be insulting. However, a little research will find many useful items that, in bulk, cost about a dollar. Buy some, and “on your way out” present a “thank you” item. I present tiny, add to keychain flashlights; some admit to calling me back just to get an additional one!

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December 28, 2020

Money and the Notary

Filed under: Ken Edelstein — admin @ 12:49 pm

Background
In my youth, quite some time ago; I met with Ben Franklin at Fraunces Tavern in lower Manhattan in the colony of New York. He told me that the phrase ‘A Penny Saved is a Penny Earned’ means that it is as useful to save money that you already have as it is to earn more. I found this inspirational, and was causative to this blog entry.

Pennies Saved
Saving money is a double edged situation. Of course you get to keep the cash by not spending it and add to your personal wealth. Naturally this assumes those who you trusted to make a payment to you actually do. Personally, I follow mom’s advice to not trust strangers and most often require PayPal in advance. But I digress. It’s nice to accumulate wealth for needs unanticipated; as well as the anticipation of becoming “elderly”, sick or disabled. Thus Ben was quite correct, simply put: it’s nice to keep those pennies.

However there is the other edge: wise spending. We enjoy choices, many choices vie for our pennies. A quality smart phone that can run wayz (a cell phone based GPS navigation aid) will save fuel and often travel time. Hoarding all income is impractical, if not impossible. The pennies not saved; in effect invested, can yield many more pennies. Mobile Notaries with quality equipment; and, of course the skills to deploy them often prosper. Misers rarely flourish.

Pennies Earned
Pardon the repetition; earning money is also double edged. Multiple dichotomies exist. One can do ten jobs for twenty five dollars each, or five jobs for fifty dollars each. Sure that is an over simplification of the lowballer. However the concept is a valid one. Similarly, the complex and lengthy to process tasks are generally the most lucrative. To get them you need a lot of skill, advanced education; and a reputation of excellence. Notaries compete rather than cooperate. There are many chasing the same few assignments. What to do? The simplest, albeit harshest solution; would be for the near failing, to seek other employment.

John Houseman for Smith Barney, said, “They make money the old fashioned way… they earn it,” Do you really do everything in your power to, in every case; do all that you can to earn your fee? Some do, but many do not. Most of us have probably received a “clean up” assignment. That is one where our employer stresses the need for accuracy and that they probably would “lose their client” if the job was re-botched.

A Closing saved is a Closing earned
A perfect error free package is a joy to receive. All the right boxes were checked and the fill in information was properly entered. Of course the signatures, initials and notarizations were a joy to behold. No need to call anyone, it was done, and done completely right the first time. They are not going to call Ghost Busters Notary for the next job – they call the provider of perfection.

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December 26, 2020

Squirrel Becomes Notary Public?

Filed under: Ken Edelstein — admin @ 12:47 pm

Not really, but in the “second time” redo of failed to fund packages; affiants have more than once told me a squirrel could have done a better job. Why is this? It’s not that the notaries don’t know how to notarize; they have problems with related responsibilities. By analogy, becoming a parent involves a relatively simple procedure. Being a good parent is much more complicated.

[She] / He who has imagination without learning, has wings and no feet. — Joseph Joubert
Substitute “Notary Commission” for “imagination” – that describes the situation for many. It’s not difficult to deliver perfection. It does take dedication and an intense desire for the “self gratification” that comes from delivering personal best. When you complete that assignment does it make you feel really good? It should. Knowing that no one, yes, no one could have done a better job should give the Notary a feeling of Pride, and “inner glow” of self satisfaction.

Learning can’t replace experience; but the reverse is also true. In addition to the basic Notary functions (ID check, Jurat/Acknowledgement, Oath, Stamp, Emboss) there is much knowledge to be acquired. Many simply don’t know how to communicate efficiently; neither giving nor receiving accurate and appropriate information succinctly. If you answer the phone with an all too often “hello”; the caller needs to ask “who is this”. Better would be “Good Afternoon, my name is Sally; how may I help you”. Do you need to send 3 emails because you did not ask all the questions in your first? Rest assured the “other side” is forming the “klutz” image of you.

You should have business cards, they are cheap enough. It’s a good practice to “sign your work” by placing your card at the top of the pile. Affix it with a binder clip, never just shove loose pages into a shipping envelope. Then, if someone has a question it’s easy for them to reach you. And, they have your “advertisement” so they know how to reach you for the next assignment. Try to always use stiff cardboard shipping envelopes, not the floppy ones.

Sometimes you win, sometimes you lose. My assignment tomorrow is for a loan package with both husband and wife signing. She is bedridden – they will make the process very slow. I will bring a clipboard for husband to bring pages; one at a time, to wife for her signatures and initials. Not knowing for sure the ailment; I will keep away, but be sure to actually witness the fact that she did indeed sign where necessary. It will probably take quite some time as she is a co-borrower and signs almost all pages. Some are easy, some are hard. Last week I had a 9 page job for my standard fee; it took 5 minutes. It averages out. Don’t develop an attitude when things go slowly – like the classic sign in the coffee shop: Don’t complain about the coffee, someday you too will be old and weak. With an eye to self preservation by avoiding sickness – we can and should do everything possible to accommodate those “less fit” than ourselves.

Lastly, be of good cheer. Nobody likes to work with a sourpuss. A smile and a few kind words will help the process go smoothly, for all concerned. Most people will “reflect” the way you act in their behavior to you, so be pleasant in the face of difficult situations. When you handle that “tough” one – detail what you did when asking for a review; you will often receiving a glowing one!

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December 24, 2020

A Job to Lose Money

Filed under: Ken Edelstein — admin @ 12:44 pm

As notaries we often do poorly on assignments that we accept without getting the full specifications prior to quoting s fee. Sometimes things are slow and we accept a job that is just barely worth doing. Especially when factoring in expenses and putting a reasonable valuation to our time. But, this job was different; it was structured for me to actually lose money.

Hi Ken, old pal; I need all of your expertise for this job. Hmmm, the name was unfamiliar as was the company “whatever document services”. My BS antenna goes up. I just knew that this one would be going nowhere. When strangers start with “old pal” it never works out.

The processing of this edoc will be a bit unusual. That was an understatement. What we need you to do is to print and deliver a set of documents but you do not need to notarize them. However, we require you to sign a form that you did deliver the documents. I’m starting to think they want me as a process server; often a punch on the nose is incurred. But, that was not the end of the assignment. After you deliver the documents we need you to “arrange” for a notary to go to the same location to do the notarizations. After that, pick them up and ship to us. For this assignment we are willing to pay fifty dollars. It was to be about 30 pages and in midtown Manhattan where parking is always illegal / expensive. After the documents have been notarized you can return them to us using the prepaid airbill which we will supply. Let me see if I understand you. You want me to print, deliver, sign a process server form, arrange for a notary to visit, pick up the notarized documents and ship them to you, right?

Exactly, I just knew you were the right person for the job; and you don’t have to notarize a thing! Well, I can print and deliver; that would not be a problem. I would charge you double what you are offering and would be unable to sign any form or arrange a notary or return to pickup and ship. It sounds to me that you want a process server. Why did you ask me if I was a notary when the tasks you describe don’t require me to notarize?

Well, some notaries resent being “called” process servers; so we just describe the work. Also, notaries are familiar with printing letter and legal paper. Don’t worry about the little form that you sign – it is truthful – you did deliver the documents to the right person; notaries always check ID. And, there is a spot on the form for you to record what ID you were presented; that makes what you do documented and “legal”.

Do you pay my fee in advance, or do I have to pay the notary that I find, (must be same day); out of my own pocket? And, you are probably aware that a rush notary would probably charge over what you are offering. All that we can pay you is $50, we suggest you find a 20$ notary so you can keep “most” of what we pay to you. Thoughts of profanity, but resisted; it was not easy!

Well, the way I see it the job is: printing, delivering, a hostile or violent reception, frantic calls to find a cheepo notary, return trip to pick up (was it notarized properly), a trip to drop off – and lastly a few weeks wait while you inspect the documents and possibly send me a check during the next solar eclipse. Thank you but NO, please put me on your “do not call” list. Good Bye.

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December 22, 2020

A Virus in your email inbox

Filed under: Ken Edelstein — admin @ 12:41 pm

A Virus in your email Inbox
What to look for

We hear the sound of incoming email and hope it’s an assignment that will produce some revenue. Before you click a link – take a look. There are some very obvious signs that the click might result in real trouble. Ransomware asks for payment to unlock your newly encrypted hard drive. Many other virus types take your personal information and sell to eager identity thieves. And there are the ones that just delete everything – perhaps sent by a competitor?

I have strong defenses, but why test them? So, I look for some of the tell tale signs that the email is one that should not be clicked on. Some bad signs are: Lack of any phone number to ask a question in the email. Any use of a shortened link, typically a bit.ly/dh345 – there are several others. You do not know where that will go – shortened links are translated to ultimate web addresses after you click them. There is no valid reason for an edoc package to be accessed via a shortened link. One other sign is the total lack of any information about what, when or where (so the same shell can be sent to many). Often a high dollar fee is mentioned, but nothing else. Also, rather than a link, sometimes just a PDF is attached.

What not to do, and what to do
Don’t click any link in a suspect email, no matter what the text says. The destination of the link is often not what you see. I usually respond (not being sure if it’s real) with two words. Call me. Nothing more. If there is someone who really wants you they will call. Today I had 2 of this type of email and neither responded. I waited half an hour then deleted them. As the shortened links are formulated as URL addresses; you can carefully copy the address – and enter it into the URL area on virustotal.com – they can virus scan the file. You can also submit the PDF to virus total and it will be checked, by many anti-virus engines for contamination.

Sometimes the PDF or link will yield yet another display with yet another click bait. Playing with suspect emails at this level is very dangerous. But if you are truly determined to follow the path to see what it goes to – don’t use your own PC, Access your email from a rented PC. When you rent a PC you have a very low security clearance – and that machine is probably protected in many other ways.

You can unscramble the link
There are many services that reverse the scramble to show you where the compressed link will go. Google – shortened URL decoder – there are many. But are they safe? Perhaps, but I choose to simply reply “call me” and wait half an hour to simply delete the suspicious ones.

Shields UP
Keep your anti-virus up to date. Check it. Does it update frequently? I use F-protect as my antivirus program (among many other barriers). It often updates several times a day. Sure, I know it’s up to date – but I would be a fool to process a ringer as if it came from a known source.

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December 16, 2019

Keep your eyes on what is Important

Filed under: Ken Edelstein — admin @ 8:34 am

Keep your eyes on what is Important
I was a student pilot flying a little Cessna 150 single engine plane. My instructor believed in making me ready for any situation, As I approached Kobelt airport in upstate New York (a very short runway – under 3000 feet) was before me. I had landed there a few times and knew that a perfect approach, airspeed and elevation was essential; lest I have to call a “missed approach” apply full power and go around to try the approach again.

I spotted something in the middle of the runway – during a rather good approach. I could not make out what it was! My eyes fixed on it for about 2 seconds trying to determine what the obstruction was. Thankfully, I took a look at the bigger picture and noticed that a slight crosswind was directing the plane toward a rather large tree! Flaps up, full power, slightly lift the “nose” – over the trees I went, just above stall speed! The object was my instructor, teaching me to look where I was going….

I doubt you notarize for the fun of it. You want to earn money, the more the better. However just earning money can be somewhat pointless without there being Profit. Some might object to my use of the “P” word – but, even if I offend some – it’s central to this article; and I will use it.

Profit is the money left over after the costs of doing business are deducted from revenue. Many are the callers I speak to that offer revenue, but not profit. A 50 dollar edoc that takes an hour plus each way is a rejected offer – there is revenue; but no profit. We all know the components that go into our costs; no need for me to again enumerate them here. However, some will take any assignment hoping to “show their mettle” – with a higher rate on subsequent jobs. That has never worked – “they” remember the least you would accept and will offer not a penny more.

Keep your eyes on what is Important – Profit. Sure it’s virtually impossible to account for the= share of “overhead” expenses on a per job basis. However, it’s pretty easy to “feel” if you are at least earning what you feel you are worth. Some with a high degree of skill probably will want a higher rate per hour compared to those just starting out. But, for the vast majority of us we desire to earn, what’s the popular amount now? Hmmmm, are your efforts earning 15$ an hour?

Of course that 15$ amount is very low; but some take the bait and make less; how is that possible? Well, with eyes on the important, let us take two views. You decline the lowball and they say “there are lots of notaries who will take what we are offering” – that’s unfortunately true. But so is the flip side, there are lots of firms that are willing to offer more. Stand fast, don’t break ranks to the bottom fisher. Many posts here and on other sites tell you how to make the two most important actions. First, learn a lot about what you are authorized to do. Secondly, make yourself known widely; sure some will be lowballers – you just decline, best done with an “unsubscribe” one word reply.

As my little plane approached the trees I had a decision to make; with very little time to make it. I could have adjusted course and “attempted” to pull off a landing; but I knew my skills were not up to that level of flying. I chose to abort the missed approach – and lived to try again. But, it was a lesson well learned. When landing a plane look where the plane is going. When being a notary look at the “bottom line” and keep aware: will you profit properly or lose by accepting?

You might also like:

Dress Brittish, Think Yiddish
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=8643

Ken’s take on how to be a bad boy/girl Notary
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22374

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September 17, 2019

Ken’s most popular oldies

Filed under: Ken Edelstein — admin @ 3:55 am

Here are some blog entries that I like to link to, but they tend to get buried.

Dress British, Think Yiddish
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=8643

The Signature Name Affidavit
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16298

The Right to Cancel done Wrong
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=10001

Notarizing your foreign language document
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=2768

A job declined
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19979

Ken’s list of things a notary might goof on
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19427

Split PDF’s into legal and letter
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=8856

The Affidavit of Occupancy
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=10193

The Compliance Agreement
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=15828

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August 6, 2019

I Bounced Trustee signing – Refunded – 15 Min after docs arrived

Filed under: Ken Edelstein — admin @ 9:08 pm

I Bounced Trustee signing – Refunded – 15 Min after docs arrived
I asked the all purpose question – Is there anything else I will be asked to do other than print, go, legally notarize, ship, report completion. They said “that’s it”. They sent my standard PayPal fee in 5 minutes.

When the doc arrived there was a requirement to scan and email two of the pages; OK, I’ll live with it. Even though it requires finding a parking spot, scan, email, and back out to ship. But, as they paid so quickly – I just said to myself “such is life”. But, it gets worse, as usual with my telling a lot worse.

Postdate not Backdate.
Along with the scan and email was a statement from title that I could ignore the fact that the docs were dated for the day after the notarization was scheduled. That was on the Mortgage. Borrower was predated as (no changes) signing on the 5th, the witnesses (another surprise) date the actual 4th as do I. That sure would look strange. I check with American Society of Notaries – that’s prohibited. Strike One.

Notary notarize thy self
There were two documents for notary only signatures that called for venue, stamped and seal. The first had me swear to the validity of the attached borrower ID copy – also prohibited by ASN. The second asked me to “verify” that the correct person signed, again sworn by me. Strike Two.

The closing Affidavit
The borrower signed over the words “Minnie Mouse, Trustee” – but in the notary section after the before me was “Minnie Mouse, followed by a lengthy description of the trust details”. They did include a copy of the trust (to reassure me?). Thus I was providing the trust details that the affiant did not swear to! It was the same situation for several other documents. Strike Three.

Let me outta here
Fortunately they sent the docs on Tuesday, at 7PM with the task scheduled for Thursday at 3PM, about two days later. Of course nobody at title was there to answer the phone. How I wished I had asked for the person who gave me the assignment to provide their cell number. I sent emails only stating that I had issues with the documents and also processed a complete PayPal refund. I had not printed the docs as it is my custom to review the PDFs on screen to be sure I would be able to accept the task. I also sent screen images of the ASN site showing that the specifics mentioned above were prohibited notary functions.

Lessons Learned
During “first contact” I was given the choice of them emailing the doc to me or they would ship the package to the borrower. Always have the doc emailed to you – so you can take a look at it and not wind up in a situation where you must decline to proceed and also want a trip fee. That would make for everyone involved to be unhappy. Look carefully at those notary sections, they are your statement. The fact that they sent me the Trust is meaningless; the notarized document must be able to “stand on its own”. Years later if there is litigation would you have the Trust document? Has it been revoked? Are you qualified to determine if it is valid? I am only allowed in the notary section to have the name as on ID.

What to do
Run away from questionable jobs. Your defense attorney would cost you a lot more than the tiny notary fee. Don’t count on E&O to step in when your actions are clearly improper – Dump the illegal tasks!

You might also like:

Good Deed Bad Deed
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16285

The 123notary elite certification study guide
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20118

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July 8, 2019

Looking Beyond the Notary Section – A case Example

Filed under: Ken Edelstein — Tags: , — admin @ 3:01 am

The classic examples
We are often told not to notarize a document that contains blank areas. Of course in reality we do exactly that in every loan package. Take a look at the 1003 (the computer version of the loan application). Lots of blank areas there and nary a single N/A. Once I was put on standby for many hours; to notarize the sale of a super tanker. The neatly bound document was thicker than the Manhattan phone book (alas no longer issued). It was about 1500 pages. I did not turn each page in a desperate attempt to find a wayward and un-entered fill in. After about 6 hours of waiting time, I notarized the (approx from recollection) two dozen affiants at the end.

What happened today
The document was an amendment to an incorporation agreement. There were to be eight affiants; even with the nicely preprinted notary sections it totaled four pages. Simple? Well there was an issue. Just prior to naming the trustees, there was the statement that the names and addresses of the trustees would follow. The names were there but not the addresses. I normally don’t read the documents, but wanted to be sure the list of names matched the notary sections. I mentioned the discrepancy to the person managing the signing. I was asked how this should be handled. I covered the I’m not a lawyer issue. They came up with three possible courses of action.

The first would be to simply write in the addresses. Second, would be to redact “and addresses”. The last was to simply ignore the matter. They choose option 2. So, when the “and addresses” had a line drawn thru (not at my suggestion), I felt compelled to raise the issue of the requirement to initial hand written changes.

The first two affiants had left the session after being properly notarized and were not present to initial the change. The other 5 initialed. Hmmmm, 8-2=5? Sorry, but one of the planned 8 could not attend and would be notarized at a later date, and also initial that redaction.

In all probability the infamous “fix it fairy” would provide initials for the two who left early; of course I did not suggest that. But, as unfair as it sounds to me; some were unhappy that I mentioned the discrepancy between the stated text and the data entered. In other words; it seemed to some that I “created a problem” – just by stating the obvious (to me) flaw.

In all probability I goofed In hindsight, as I peck away at the keyboard; away from the seven affiants who want me to resolve the “issue I created” – I shudda kept my big mouth shut. My biggest blunder was to agree on the 3 possible solutions. Perhaps the address is an absolute requirement for acceptance of the document. I truly don’t know. And, the only reason that I sailed into that blunder was by mentioning the issue.

Resolved: At least for me – if it’s not in the notary section, don’t read it, don’t comment on it. And absolutely say nothing about how they should proceed. It’s OK to mention initialing changes, but take no “legal opinion” about “course of action” when modifications are being considered.

You might also like:

Index of posts about Notary certificates
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20268

A guide to notarizing documents with blanks or multiple signatures
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20252

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October 29, 2018

Fix for – Your Phone Stopped Ringing

Filed under: Ken Edelstein — admin @ 12:28 pm

Fix for – Your Phone Stopped Ringing
To understand why it’s not ringing you need to understand what makes it ring. Calls come from three basic origins. Repeats, Advertising, and “where you are known”. Repeats are great, and you will have them if you did a good job for a fair price. People like to deal with a known entity – especially when the prior work was great. Ads cost money, but wisely done have a good ROI
(Return On Investment). However “ads” can be free – the following link: http://kenneth-aedelstein.com

will be “picked up” by many internet “robots” – including Google. It costs noting to
post a blog, just some time to create content that is worth the readers’ time.

Now on to “where you are known”. I have often suggested the distribution of several hundred business cards. Sure, it’s work – but has the advantage of making a good face to face impression. Well, to be honest it can take a lot of low result legwork. But, it can also be done with a strategy for low effort and high return. One good potential future caller source is doctors. They often need their statement about a patient’s health notarized. You could plan a route to cover 50 doctors in one trip. It would be an inefficient plan. Sure you would leave a card (and perhaps a brief letter about your services) with the doctors; but the narrow focus would miss other potential clients – in the same building.

A better, perhaps more efficient approach would be to visit an area. Doctors might be prime candidates – but the hardware store adjacent to the doctor should also receive a visit. Think of everyone as a potential client – why not visit an many as possible, as efficiently as possible?

This is a very generalized approach. It works for notaries, realtors or plumbers. They might not need you now, but might require your type of service in the future. Can you picture them thinking “now where did I put that card” – I vaguely recall that person seemed competent.

Don’t feel like making a special card distribution trip? You don’t have to. Just be sure to carry about 50+ cards with you at all times and distribute them where you go, and to places nearby.

It’s a numbers game – the cost is very low, and to be frank – the response rate is also low; initially. But some will call, perhaps becoming repeat customers. Unlike the hated “spam” email, you are delivering your card personally; perhaps starting a relationship.

One final tip. Be sure to use the back of the card to make your card a “keeper”. I have a street guide to finding buildings in Manhattan. Some have conversion charts between English and Metric measurement, some Federal holidays. Whatever you choose make it a “long term” keep. Probably the worst is a calendar – into the trash you go on New Year’s Day.

.

You might also like:

Notary – what would you do?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=21037

Situations where you can ruin a loan out of stupidity
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19987

A list of things Notaries goor (or might goof on).
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19427

Life at the bottom of the food chain
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19419

Get off your butt — and start marketing yourself
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19408

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