March 2017 - Notary Blog - Signing Tips, Marketing Tips, General Notary Advice - 123notary.com
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March 24, 2017

Sharktank: Self-Driving Notary

Filed under: Sit-Coms — admin @ 8:02 am

DO YOUR JOB OR YOU COULD SEE THIS ON SHARK TANK!

First into the tank is a notary who plans to eliminate the competition.

CONTESTANT: Hello, sharks. My name is Jesse and I’m seeking $200,000 for 10% of my company, Self-Notary! Imagine eliminating the hassle of human beings showing up late for signings. Of making fun of your driver’s license picture ID. Well imagine no more! Self-Notary brings the future of automated transportation to your doorstep! So sharks, who’s ready to sign… on the dotted line?

MR. WONDERFUL: You’re talking about putting your fellow workers out of business. I’m sure they’ll want to sign all right. Your death certificate! How does this job-robbing invention of yours work?

CONTESTANT: A self-driving notary vehicle shows up at the client’s door. The signer puts his ID in the slot, scans his document, signs the online journal, puts his money in the dollar feed, and the machine sends the document.

DAYMOND: How does it get an oil change if it’s driverless?

CONTESTANT: An automated mechanic drives out to change it.

MR. WONDERFUL: You’re valuing your company at two million dollars. I assume there are SALES to report about. At least there better be.

CONTESTANT: We’re in pre-launch.

MARK: Oh. brother. And you expect us to pre-pay before we even know if it works?

LORI: What does it cost you to make, and what does it cost the client?

CONTESTANT: $100,000 a unit. And it costs the client a fee per signature plus a travel fee.

MR. WONDERFUL: That’s terrible. That’s a big nothing-burger. The day I get my money back on a deal like this is the day I need a haircut – which I haven’t needed since I became BALD! I’m out.

DAYMOND: After the notarization is finished, does the driverless car give the client a flourless cake as a thank you gift?

CONTESTANT: No, but that’s a great idea! My wife is a terrible gardener. We could eat the cake in her flower-less garden.

DAYMOND: It was MY great idea! I’m out.

BARBARA: I’ve been watching your presentation, and I think you’re a lousy salesman.

CONTESTANT: Would you swear to that?

BARBARA: Yes. But you wouldn’t be a credible witness.

LORI: So are you in, Barbara, or are you out?

BARBARA: I’m gonna make him an offer.

MR. WONDERFUL: You’re insane. I forbid you from murdering innocent money like that.

BARBARA: I’ll give you half the money you want, but you’re gonna need a lot of my help. I want 20% and I want another shark to go in on the deal.

LORI: I’ll go in on that deal with you, Barbara. 20% each. I deal with notaries who show up late all the time. I think there’s a market for automated notaries. And the human ones they put out of business can learn from the embarrassment of it and beat the automated notaries at their own game by signing up with the best of them on 123notary.com.

MR. WONDERFUL: What is this, product placement?

LORI: I get a few extra bucks for it. They don’t call me a shark for nothing. You better sign up on 123notary.com before the automated notaries do.

MR. WONDERFUL: You did it again?

LORI: Cha-ching.

Just then, the shark’s worst nightmare rolled in before their eyes!

MR. WONDERFUL: What is that monstrosity?

CONTESTANT: Oh, that’s the other product I’m working on. That’s automated you, Mr. Wonderful! Self-driving Shark!

BARBARA: Looks just like him. Especially the chrome dome.

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March 23, 2017

The 3 day right to rescind

Filed under: (4) Documents,Loan Signing 101 — admin @ 8:00 am

This article intends to clarify dating on the Notice of Right to Cancel or RTC.

A borrower went to confession

TOM: “Forgive me father for I have rescinded.”

PADRE: “Did you rescind in the 3 day period?”

TOM: “Yes, father.”

PADRE: “Then, it is okay in the eyes of the lord. 3 hail Mary’s.”

TOM: “It was in two days, so can you reduce my sentence to 2 hail Mary’s?”

When you get a non-commercial and non-investment personal refinance, traditionally you get three days to resind or cancel your loan. Counties these three days is a skill that Notaries need, but don’t always have. In the old days, and with certain lenders, the Notary is reponsible to write in the TRANSACTION DATE in a blank in the RTC.

The transaction date is the date when a notarization is done or when a loan is signed. Technically with Acknowledged signatures, the signature can be made previous to the Notarization. It might be five minutes previously or twenty years previous to the notarization. During loan signings, the documents are normally signed at the time of the loan signing and promptly notarized.

The signature date is normally the same as the transaction date, but not necessarily and is the date the person signed the document. Once again, in an Acknowledgment, that could come before the notarization if the borrower wishes to sign ahead of time, but at a loan signing is normally on the date of the loan signing.

The notarization date is the date when a document is notarized.

The recission date or deadline or last day to rescind is three days after the date of the signing not including Sundays or Federal hollidays or other days that the Lender allows.

Please note that business days only include Monday to Friday while days to rescind include Monday to Saturday not including Federal Holidays of which there are ten.

Let’s do some practice runs.

(1.) A loan is signed New Year’s eve on Friday the 31st. What is the last day to cancel your Refinance?
Sat would be New Year’s Day a Federal holiday. Sunday would be a Sunday and not counted. So, you would have… Mon, Tues, Wednesday would be the last day.

(2.) A loan is signed on Monday in April when there are no Federal holidays. The last day to cancel is… Tues, Weds, Thursday would be the last day.

(3.) A loan is signed on Sunday in April. The last day to cancel is… Mon, Tues, Wednesday would be the last day to cancel.

(4.) A loan is signed on Thursday in April. The last day to cancel is… Fri, Sat, skip Sunday and Monday would be the last day to cancel.

(5.) A loan is signed Wednesday before Thanksgiving. The last day to cancel would be… Fri, Sat, skip sunday and then Monday would be the last day to cancel UNLESS the Lender allows Friday as an arbitrary holiday (they can be generous if they like) in which case it would be… Sat, Mon, and Tuesday would be the last day to cancel. Whether Black Friday is considered a holiday or not is up to the Lender and they are 50/50 on this one. But, if they don’t specify, then it is considered a regular business day with exceptionally long lines!

Now boys and girls, we understand the RTC or Notice of Right to Cancel. We hope you are also aware of when the ten Federal holidays come. It is not a bad idea to have a Rescission Calendar. I heard that the NNA might have them, so get one that fits in your wallet.

What’s in YOUR wallet?

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March 22, 2017

Notaries with the same name – drama!

Filed under: General Stories — admin @ 7:59 am

We had several situations where there was a small drama because more than one Notary had the same name.

In one instance, a Notary in Michigan named John Smith got the check for a Notary also named John Smith in Alabama. They had the same name. The Michigan John Smith deposited the check too.

In another instance a Notary who had been offline was put back online. The Florida Melody Smith was put back online. Then Melody Smith emailed me to let me know that she was still not online. Then I took a closer look and realized that there was a California Melody Smith as well who was not online. Ooops! So, I put California Melody Smith online and explained my mistake.

Then, we had a new Notary named Howard Lee. I was horribly afraid because I had had a roommate named Howard Lee. What if it were the same person? They were both in California. Gasp!!! However, my heartrate went down when I learned that Notary Howard Lee indicated Korean as a second language, where the ex-roommate who wanted to kill me because of a lie his girlfriend told him spoke Chinese.

In another instance Samantha Cornfield got the other Samantha Cornfield’s password. Ooops — security breach. She emailed me and I sent the password for a completely different person with the same name.

The moral of the story is that I need to really be more careful and check people’s email address when they contact me because email addresses are unique, but there could be infinite numbers of people with the same personal name.

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March 21, 2017

When to refuse a notarization: a comprehensive guide

Filed under: Technical & Legal — Tags: , — admin @ 9:38 pm

Most clients you have will have legal requests, but from time to time, there will be someone who wants you to bend the law, or someone who doesn’t understand proper protocol. Here is how to handle the difficult requests.

Situations where a signer is not appropriate to notarize
(1) If you cannot prove the signer’s identity with satisfactory evidence. Some states allow personal knowledge of the signer, so please study your state rules. Satisfactory evidence normally involves current, or near current driver’s licenses, passports, or other government issued ID. Each state has different variations on what is acceptable, so know your state rules!

(2) If the signer doesn’t appear before you.
This means that they should be a few feet from you and fully visible.

(3) If you cannot communicate directly with the signer.
This means that the signer needs to speak the same language that you speak. If you speak the signer’s language as a second language, but don’t know it well enough to understand all of the communication necessary to give instructions and answer questions regarding the notarization, then you should decline.

(4) If the signer refuses to swear under Oath if an Oath is required as part of the notarization.

(5) If the signer is being coerced to sign or pressured to sign.

(6) If the signer is drugged (perhaps in a nursing home or hospital,) confused, or disoriented. If they can’t answer basic questions about the document, they are not in a clear enough mental state to sign.

(7) If the journal entry requires a thumbprint by law and the signer refuses to furnish you with one.

(8) If the signer refuses to pay the Notary fee

(9) If the signer is so incapacitated that they cannot sign their own signature.

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Situations where the document is not satisfactory

(1) If there are blanks, or omitted pages in the document.

(2) The document lacks a notary certificate and the signer refuses to tell you which type of notary act they need done.

(3) The document is a vital record, or a type of document that may not be notarized or be copy certified.

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Situations where the Notary cannot notarize due to conflict of interest

(1) If the signer is your parent, spouse, child, or other close family member. It might be okay to notarize for cousins and more distant relatives although it is generally better to avoid notarizing anything important for a family member due to conflict of interest.

(2) If you are named as a beneficiary in a document or have any type of financial interest in the document being signed.

(3) If you are the signer of the document, you may not notarize your own signature (contradictory to popular belief.)

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I created this blog because of a discussion I had with a Notary who went to another Notary at a UPS store to get notarized. The Notary refuseed to notarize because the signer (also a Notary) refused to be thumbprinted. I had to look this up. California state law did not discuss the issue, but did say it was illegal for a Notary to refuse service. I researched what NNA had to say about this issue and they concured with California in an article about when to say no. In any case, I hope this article was helpful.

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March 20, 2017

Are those other things you’re doing worth $1000 per hour?

Filed under: Certification & Communication Skills — admin @ 7:13 am

Passing the 123notary certification test can reasonably make you an additional $30,000 over the next 10 years. You might need a few hours to study and some wait time if you need to email me for a password to take the test when I’m busy. But, your total hours invested might be 30 hours maximum if you were the most thorough Notary in the history of Notary-Kind. So, you invest 30 hours and get $30,000 in delayed gratification. That is $1000 per hour.

$30,000 extra in a decade — it’s like winning the lottery!
If you get half a job extra per week because of that certification that is $50 extra per week, and $2500 extra per year which is $25,000 in ten years which is close to my figure. So, let’s assume that you get (.6) more jobs per week to round the number up to $30,000. I’m being reasonable, right?

But, I’m so busy?
I get this all the time. I can’t find time to do the certification test because I’m so busy. The problem is not that you are busy, but that you failed at mastering the art of organizing your time. If you have thirty tasks to do, but only have time for ten, you assign a priority to each task from one to thirty, and do the most time sensitive or critical task first, and then do the other critical tasks after, and neglect the tasks that are less critical.

Are those other tasks worth $1000 per hour?
Is doing your laundry worth $1000 per hour like studying for our certification test? Probably not. Is taking that Notary job for $75 with faxbacks going to get you ahead in the long run? That’s three hours out of your day right there. Is going to Kim’s birthday party all that? That all depends on what Kim is wearing! Is cleaning your house a priority? Be a slob until you pass that test. Your test should come first and everything else should come after. If it takes you a month to pass that test, put it on the front burner and make everything and everyone else wait until you pass that test.

Let the laundry stack up
My laundry stacks up when I’m working on a project. I do my laundry in a bucket to save myself the time of going downstairs to the public laundry machines which need to be watched. I focus on the priority at hand when I want to get something done. I find more efficient ways of doing all of the tasks that I do. You need to schedule some time and make sure that you get that certification test done. The minute you don’t make it a priority, you’ll forget about it until I call you months after the fact and you’ll say — oh yeah.

Get it done!
The fact is that many people get many extra jobs per week or per day as a result of passing that test, and many people pass the test with only three or four hours of study. The rewards might be up to $200,000 for a busy Notary in increased jobs over the next ten years. Many of you will be Notaries for twenty years. So, neglecting to pass my test is not only stupid, it’s insane. Buckle down and get it done!

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March 17, 2017

A guy dressed up as a Notary for Halloween

Filed under: Humorous Posts — admin @ 6:57 am

A guy dressed up as a Notary Seal kept saying, “Trick or Treat.” He went around stamping everything. Then he bumped into someone dressed up as a Signing Company who was also saying, “Trick or Treat.” The Notarygave the signing company his seal impression on some fake loan documents.

The signing company impersonator said — trick!
The Notary asked what the trick was.
The signing company said — we’re not paying you

So, the Notary got even and smeared edible chocolate ink all over the signing company impersonator’s outfit and said — treat!

So, the Notary got even. If that Notary impersonator had been a little smarter, he would have looked up the signing company on 123notary’s list of signing companies i-phone page www.123notary.com/s and said — I can’t take that job! However, this fake Notary had a handheld printer and queried 123notary’s resource page to find our demand letter from hell (very appropriate type of letter for halloween.) He gave the signing company a demand letter. The signing company gave him a threatening letter from someone dressed up as an Attorney (with blood coming out of his left eye.)

Finally the Notary said — you people will be a pain in my rear for the rest of my life — if I should live so long! Happy Halloween!!!!

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March 16, 2017

Video notarizations? Good idea or not?

Filed under: Technical & Legal — admin @ 7:58 am

As you may or may not know, Virginia and Montana are states where webcam notarizations are allowed. So far, only one fraudulent individual has cracked the record keeping system which involves technology a lot newer than it was five years ago when webcam notarizations first started.

Timothy Reiniger is a Director of Digital Services Group who said that, “The idea of a physical presence makes no sense in a global economy.” Tim is correct, however, the purpose of a Notary is not to facilitate a global economy, but to defacilitate (deter) fraud. The Notary’s job is to make life harder not easier — and for the purpose of reducing criminal activity involving signatures. Tim wanted the Notary to have a role in online internet commerce which he felt was needed. However, if you are online in any part of the world, you can get notarized by someone in a nearby UPS store.

Companies offering webcam notarizations use KBA which is a knowledge-based authentication to verify the identity of a signer. The system uses a srious of questions about the signer’s personal background which is based on information in credit bureau databases. Unfortunately, a professional identity thief can steal exactly the type of information that KBA would most likely verify. Therefor, such a system should not be used for transactions involving any large financial value including Deeds to properties in my opinion.

The Notary is required to keep a video record of each remote notarization in the two states that allow this type of notary act. The video is a deterant to frauds who don’t want to be on camera.

A video notarization wouldn’t be able to tell you so easily if the signer was signing under duress. Another issue is that relatives of the signer can easily know the personal questions KBA would ask such as mother’s maiden name, date of birth, favorite color, etc.

In my opinion, if online notarizations are to continue or grow in popularity, an online thumbprint is the most fool-proof system of identifying an individual. You can fake an ID; You can give correct answers to someone else’s security questions if you are a friend, relative, or identity thief. But, you cannot fake someone’s thumbprint. When I was a Notary, I took journal thumbprints for every seroius transaction I performed. It takes seconds, and is a much more reliable form of identification than anything else. When in doubt, use the NNA inkless thumbrinter!

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March 15, 2017

Questions to ask to see if an ID is fake

Filed under: Technical & Legal — admin @ 7:58 am

As a Notary, you might run into a fake ID from time to time, but there are not so many of them out there proportionally. Most Notaries don’t bother to take a closer look at ID’s, but perhaps you should inspect each one as if it was fraudulently created.

Always inspect an ID to see:

1. There should be a physical description, expiration date and signature. If these are omitted, the ID is probably fake.

2. Newer ID’s contain raised lettering, embedded images, holographic images and microprinting.

3. A fake ID might have letters blurred together, or print that appears above the lamination.

4. Peeling lamination is a bad sign

5. See if the person’s eyebrows match. Women change their hairstyle and color regularly leaving the eyebrows. mouth and nose as more reliable features for identification.

Questions you could ask

1. You could ask the person their address or zip code.

2. Ask them their sign rather than their DOB. You can memorize a DOB, but nobody memorizes a fake sign. I’m a Leo by the way.

3. You could use an ultraviolet light to see if the perforated image looks authentic compared to a real ID (like yours in your pocket.)

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March 14, 2017

Living Will vs Durable Medical Power of Attorney

Living Will vs Durable Medical Power of Attorney

NOMENCLATURES
The Living Will (LW), unlike a Last Will and Testament, takes effect immediately. The LW&T, is used when the Testator dies. The LW has no further function when the Principal dies.

The Durable Medical Power of Attorney (DMPA) is often referred to as a “health care proxy”. The DPMA is also called a “health care surrogate” as that position is what it creates. Durable, in the sense that it typically has no expiration date and continues when the Grantor is incapacitated.

SUMMARY
Typically used for serious illness and near end of life medical care decisions, both the LW and the DMPA are both unrelated to the disposition of assets. The LW is essentially instructions from the patient to the doctor(s) and hospital staff as to the patient’s wishes. With the LW the patient is directly expressing desired care. With the DMPA the patient is granting decision making power to someone else.

POSSIBLE CONFLICT
It is possible for both a LW and a DPMA to be active at the same time. If the health care surrogate has a different opinion from that expressed in the LW it probably becomes a very complex issue to resolve.

THE LIVING WILL
The LW expresses your “will” or desire how to be treated while you are living. It is often used to reject life-sustaining treatments when terminally ill. These treatments often include intravenous feeding of food and water, heart-lung machines, ventilators, etc. When there is no detectable brain activity, and the body alone is being sustained, artificially; some prefer to terminate their existence. Note that the LW will not affect routine medical treatments. Prior to the discontinuation of “life support” two doctors are usually required to make the determination that the outlook for recovery is virtually non-existent. Key point: the LW does not change any pain or routine treatment for non life-threatening medical conditions.

THE DURABLE MEDICAL POWER OF ATTORNEY
The surrogate comes into power under this document only when the patient is unconscious or not legally able to make decisions on their behalf. More commonly called a Health Care Proxy, this POA often allows for successor agents, the same as a routine Power of Attorney. This form may be statutory or must be drafted by an attorney. The DMPA lets the physician know who is authorized to “make the call”; as the relatives may have a variety of opinions, and sometimes their own agenda.

NOTARY CONSIDERATIONS
This is an area where the more notarizations the better. Both documents are “human life” and “estate” related; and, for some, timing is everything. Obviously the author and any witnesses should be notarized. As “state of mind” is often an issue; the patients doctor, if possible should add a “sound mind” witness statement. If the documents are prepared well in advance of hospitalization, the attorney can also add a similar statement, also notarized. This is a highly emotionally charged situation. Great care must be taken to be sure names are printed legibly and your work is flawless. Witnesses should be totally unrelated, have no interest in the estate or payment of medical bills. These documents call for empathy, attention to detail, and very strict adherence to local governing laws.

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March 13, 2017

Buzzwords to avoid in your notes section

Filed under: Your Notes Section — admin @ 7:19 am

Some Notaries have mastered the art of writing an amazing notes section while others resort to cheap imitations. Using the wrong buzz words can backfire on you and I have seen this happen many times. A good notes section is about being unique and informative and not about making baseless claims.

Responsible
Don’t be reponsible — whatever you do. Show that you are responsible, but don’t claim it. Make them say how responsible you are in your review page. You will get less clicks to your listing if you claim to be responsible.

Dependable
Claiming to be dependable is as bad as claiming to be responsible. Just don’t!

Error-Free
It sounds too good to be true if you have signed 2000 error-free signings. Even if you claim 99.5% accuracy, nobody will believe it. Save it for the birds. You can’t prove it.

Detail-Oriented
The most sloppy people write that they are detail-oriented in their notes. This claim almost works against you.

Punctual
Prove it to your customers, but don’t claim it in your notes. This word just takes up space.

Professional
It is not bad to claim to be professional, but it doesn’t make it true either. This is more of a neutral non-buzz word. It won’t help you.

Modest
We use the word modest in our tutorial. But, don’t boast of being modest. Just be modest — or don’t just be modes.

Experienced
This is a neutral word, but it takes up space. It is better to say how experienced. Number of years is not as useful as number of loans and what types of loans. Be specific about your experience.

Personable
It is good to be friendly, but you need to back this up with some professional experience as a waitress or customer service experience. Make it sound believable and something people can put their finger on.

Flexible Schedule
Tell us your hours instead of saying flexible. Be specific.

I have a mentor
If you have not signed any loans, but your mentor is an expert, tell us how we can contact your mentor to hire them instead of you. Please keep the notes section about you and what you do, will do or have done.

You might also like:

Clarifying vague claims in your notes section
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=4675

How to write a notes section if you are a beginner
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16698

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