July 2017 - Notary Blog - Signing Tips, Marketing Tips, General Notary Advice - 123notary.com
123Notary

Notary Blog – Signing Tips, Marketing Tips, General Notary Advice – 123notary.com Control Panel

July 21, 2017

Uncommon ways you could be late to a signing

Filed under: Notary Mistakes — admin @ 9:00 am

It is good to be on time to signings. But, there are ways to be late to a signing to. Bad planning, failure to account for distance, traffic, or printing are common. But, here are some uncommon ones.

1. Your GPS doesn’t have the road you are going to because the road is brand new — or the GPS is quite old.

2. Your new tire got a puncture wound in the side of the tire coming in at a diagonal.

3. They were repaving a road on your way to the signing that you could not circumvent.

4. A UFO abducted you on your way to the signing.
NOTARY “Do you need a Notary?” GREEN GUY “No, but could you like us on Facebook?”

5. Your credit card is deactivated you and you don’t have enough cash to buy gas leaving you stranded.

6. Your Notary seal expires on April 24th and today is April 25th.

7. There is a terrible earthquake and the roads are closed down.

8. Anti-Trump riots force the authorities to shut the city down.

9. Pro-Trump riots force the city to open back up, but block your route to the signing, unless you live in California in which case refer to point 8.

10. All the parking spaces are taken and you drive around the block for half an hour.

11. You have a reserved parking spot, but a black Jeep SUV with no license plates belonging to a dealer suddenly appears in your spot. You call security who says it could take up to two hours to remove the vehicle — yes, it happened to me and I was late to my blog writing appointment.

12. Your little girl hits her head and you go rushing home to make sure she is okay, but get fired by the Loan Officer. At least you don’t get fired as a dad! And yes, this really happened eight years ago to a client.

I think that sums it up.

Share
>

July 18, 2017

Filed under: Ken Edelstein — admin @ 10:48 am

Clients will work WITH you
Today I had a series of communications, some via email, and some via phone; about a pending assignment. It’s fascinating for me to note the growing level of assistance my client is providing, certainly due to their being required to pre-pay. This will be best related in chronological order.

The Initial Contact – I was asked if I was willing to go to a town about 40 miles distant. That might be a “local” call to many. However in the New York City area it’s at least an hour, probably closer to 1.5 hours. Nothing else was asked. I replied yes and with my base fee (not knowing what was needed) for the trip.

The Second Contact – A cheery voice – “that’s great” – I will send you the details via email, it’s for early tomorrow morning. But, I said, just a moment; there is more to discuss. My fee is paid on my web site – at this time – only then do I make a calendar entry. “We don’t pay in advance, do I have to find someone else” Yes, I answered. Sorry, that does not work for us.

The Third Contact – About two hours later that same day, after they probably made many calls. Are you still available for that early morning assignment? I am trying to get your prepayment approved. Sorry, no – early tomorrow was taken – would noon tomorrow work for you? Probably, we will get back to you shortly.

The Forth Contact – We checked with the site and they will be closed tomorrow, does Monday work for you. Yes, at this time; but I do not make a calendar appointment until payment is received. We will make payment later today or tomorrow (Friday). Fine, but if someone else wants to book Monday morning I will accept as you have not processed payment. Nb: commitments must be mutual Quid Pro Quo (this for that).
Comment – Notice that only when payment is made in advance for the trip did the caller bother to see if the affiant would be available. With prepayment they had “skin in the game” and clearly would wind up paying me to meet at a closed facility. They were quite willing to assign it on a “after you succeed we will pay” basis. I’ve been doing this a long time (10+ years). I set the rules very clearly. I always ask if the ID presented will have the same name as the name to be notarized on the document. Often I am asked what happens if they differ. You will have my sympathy for a failed non notarizing event; but not a refund. I ask for assurance of the existence of the necessary – if you send me to a situation where proceeding would be illegal, it’s your loss.

The Fifth Contact – we are checking to make sure all requirements are met. Your payment will be made later today (Thursday) or tomorrow AM. That’s fine, as soon as it is received it goes on the calendar if there is no conflicting assignment.
Comment – Note that I am “defending my calendar” – I do not confirm an appointment. Nor will I call the affiant to schedule as that commits me to showing up. It’s a medical records pick up / notarize job. Without my PayPal payment, to me; it does not exist and I will take no part other than stating my “current” availability. Well, it’s 10PM and nothing yet – no payment – no detailed who/what/when/where – just vague assurances.

I’m stopping now; will resume at noon tomorrow and chronicle what transpires, if anything. I’m back – the new day begins with a PayPal payment! However, there is a new “issue”. It’s urgent to process in Early AM on Monday; but the facility is closed till Monday and no one can assure me the affiant will be present. Sooooo, it’s a call to my client asking if they wish me to leave early for a 10AM, or wait till 10AM to confirm availability. I stress the former is “at your risk” – if affiant not available (of course after waiting a reasonable time) – then a subsequent trip will become a new charge. It’s a go. Monday I am due on location at 10AM.

You probably have received some emails from “Vendor Management” in which you are the Vendor and they are providing the Management. Turn That Around – Do you run your business or do your clients run you?

Share
>

July 17, 2017

How long should you WAIT to get paid?

Filed under: Business Tips — admin @ 10:45 am

Different companies have different payment schedules. Whether a company pays in a timely manner or not, the critical thing is for the Notary to be aware of how long it takes companies to pay. If you read forum complaints, you will see if other Notaries have had a problem with a particular company. If you keep a database on paper or on a computer, and keep records of how long each company has taken to pay others, you will have a track record for each company. Most Notaries unfortunately do not do their homework and that is why bad signing companies exist and also why newer Notaries get screwed. Do your homework; Don’t get screwed!

It is standard for companies to pay in 30 days. Most companies have a monthly billing cycle. It might take 30-59 days to get paid if they do their payments on a particular day of the month. If they pay on the 15th and you complete a job on the 16th, what if they pay you on the 15th of the month on the second month after you do the job? Hmm.

Then, there are companies that are always short on cash who string Notaries along. This is just unprofessional and not respectable. You should pay for what you get, otherwise don’t ask people to do anything for you. The Notaries who are the least valuable to the signing company, or who they have a weaker relationship with, or who are the least pushy are thes ones who get strung along. If you allow them credit for two jobs and they ask for a third without paying for the other two first they will be forced to pay you if they want your work. For a Notary who is really good, they might conform to your terms. But, if you are an unskilled whiner — good luck!

Some companies just don’t pay, or make you wait forever and go through the run around. This is just a waste of time and those companies should be put out of business.

What do I recommend?

(1) If a company is reliable about paying, then I recommend accepting anything within 60 days providing you don’t have to bill multiple times or micromanage them to get paid. 10-60 days with one bill is acceptable. The minute you have to invest extra time billing a company, you should consider charging in advance, or raising their rate by at least $20 extra.

(2) If you prefer to get paid fast, you weed out a vast quantity of your market share by demanding payment in 30 days.

(3) You can offer better terms and/or better pricing to companies that offer faster pay. You can offer them more work, volume discounts, and more attentive service to reward them for making your life easier. That way you can still get jobs from the slow-but-sure paying companies, but less of them. This is called using an algorithm — something Jeremy likes.

(4) If you adopt the Ken Edelstein philosophy and require payment up front, you will not have a problem worrying about getting paid. But, Ken is the best Notary in the business, and everyone knows it. So, that is why companies pay him more and by Paypal.com in advance to do Notary work for them while other Notaries might have trouble getting paid in advance. Ken is in the Notary business, not the money lending without collateral business. Think about it.

(5) You can apply to more Title companies. Many pay within 10-15 days. You can research them on the forums, or just try them out to see how much they pay. If they pay you fast, you can offer to do more work for them farther away to give them an incentive to use you more. You are advised to give them extra special service as well so they will continue to use you and use you frequently.

For those Notaries who are inexperienced, not well educated in signing topics, and very picky as well. I recommend swallowing your pride. You have to pay your dues in this business to do well. I suggest having 2000 signings under your belt before you begin to get picky. The real professionals who get paid well most of the time have at least 7000 signings. When I was at 4000 signings I got paid well by only about 40% of my jobs which should give you an idea. It is not fast and easy to make it to the top in this profession. Swallow your pride and work for any reasonable conditions for any company that is honest and decent even if they make you wait 60 days.

Share
>

July 14, 2017

The Atheist’s Bible — for swearing in Affirmations to non-believers

Filed under: Humorous Posts — admin @ 8:50 am

The Atheist’s Bible

When atheists do an affirmation, they need to put their hand on something. And if it’s not the bible, we need a substitute. As “nobody” is his witness… the atheist’s bible is a little different from your Adam & Eve’s Garden Variety version. It also makes a handy gift for a non-believer’s Inaugural Day swearing in ceremony.

And what is it that non-believers, according to their bible, believe?

Nobody said “Let there be light.” It just came on out of the blue.

Heaven and earth was created in three days, not including Sundays or federal holidays.

Adam and Eve decided they were the same gender and saved the hassle of putting on fig leaves.

Noah’s Ark never existed. However, Loners Ark, where there was one of everything, did. How did they reproduce, you ask? They didn’t, because they wanted to remain alone.

After Sodom and Gomorrah had their marriage certificate notarized, they went on their honeymoon to get officially sodomized. After which Gomorrah started their first marital tiff: “Why “sodomize” and no “gomorrahize”?4
When Samson got caught in hairy situations cheating on his wife, his alibis got stronger.

Moses waited forever to hear from God. When he didn’t show up, Moses came down the mountaintop and gave his people the zero commandments.

Jesus spent his 33 years searching for his real father. Never finding him was a heavy cross to bear.

Thanks for reading this. And may nobody be with you.

Share
>

July 13, 2017

Making half notarized POA photocopy valid

Filed under: Ken Edelstein — admin @ 9:51 am

Making half notarized POA photocopy valid
The Initial Call – Someone please leave a comment and let me know that I’m not the only one. I get a constant stream of “Gotcha’s”. It was a hospital POA assignment – should be routine. But, similar to a plaintiff withholding key information from their attorney; my clients often fail to mention things, even when I ask. This time, after the usual screening questions (ID, availability, rational, etc.); I get a new surprise when I arrive.

Educating The Client – After arriving at a fee for the described work (in this case one POA and one Health Care Proxy); I cover the Use of the POA. Most clients don’t realize that it is a “surrender upon use” not a “show and retain” document. Eg: When the bank allows use of a Power of Attorney to open a safe deposit box, they will retain the Original “wet signed” / embossed document. Note that I wrote “embossed document” I did not write the word “copy”. IMHO a photocopy of a notarized document is not itself a notarized document. Perhaps that is why you cannot FAX or email a deed to be recorded. But, again I stray – old age? So, I describe the surrender of the POA and ask if several POA’s might be what is needed.

Client Delighted – Armed with new knowledge, the client now wants a few additional Power of Attorney documents to be processed. I admonish (perhaps too strong a word) the client to duplicate the single POA to make the desired number of unsigned copies, prior to signatures or initialing. Will do they respond, and we agree upon a reasonable “up fee” for the additional work. Client made PayPal payment for first two documents and the additional fee will be cash on site.

At the Hospital – I arrive to find one Health Care Proxy, and a total of five Power of Attorney documents. But, to my surprise the “Agent” (my employer) had already been notarized prior to the Principal (the patient in the hospital). That has never happened in the several centuries I have been doing this. Thus the client has four photocopies of the POA – with the notarization of the Agent; not good. Many would probably just continue and notarize the signature of the Principal – using proper procedures. That would result in one valid Power of Attorney and four “half valid” copies as they do not have original Agent signatures or notarizations.

Making it Right – Clearly on the four Power of Attorney documents with the photocopy of the signature / notary – the signature of the Agent and notarization must be redone. I break out my “Acknowledgement in a Stamp” and find “clear space”. I have the Agent sign again, this time using blue ink. I complete the new Acknowledgement and also emboss it (as is my custom with any notarization). It did look slightly “odd”. The Agent was notarized in two different counties on the same day on the same document. I told my client if necessary to explain why, on the four copies a new notarization was required should anyone ask.

Wrap Up – The public has many misconceptions about notarizations, many thinking a photocopy is equivalent to an original. Few who have never used Power of Attorney documents realize that they are surrendered (usually) upon use. These are not “Legal Advice” issues as they are not specific to anyone; certainly not my client. Taking the time to share knowledge, and making the work totally acceptable – define us as dedicated and professional civil commission holders.

Share
>

July 12, 2017

Notary Effort Pricing

Filed under: Ken Edelstein — admin @ 9:45 am

Notary Effort Pricing
First an Analogy – Here in Manhattan we have two main types of “for hire” rides. The most common are the legions of Taxi Cabs (TC). Competing with the TCs is a growing number of “Limos”. The laws are changing, but generally TCs cruise the street for customers “street hails” while the Limos are called to meet clients at a specific location/time. Either gets you from here to there, but their pricing structure is quite different. The TCs have a meter that continues to increment the fare; the Limos provide a “flat rate” for the requested start/end point. As a rule the Limos drive very aggressively, wanting to complete the pre-ordained fare as quickly as possible. On the other hand the TCs are a bit more sedate, relishing that the meter keeps incrementing.

Where, When, What – While the simplicity of a flat rate sounds attractive, it fails the test of practicality. There are just too many possibilities to have a “standard notary rate”.
Where – involves principally the distance to be traveled. It also includes the type of facility (Prison, Hospital, Construction Site, etc.); add in the traffic density and speed of the roads leading to the assignment. Don’t forget car expenses; and gas prices are going up again.
When – other than 4AM emergency jobs, is related to the traffic that will be in route. Remember the “bell shaped” curve of one “standard deviation”? About two thirds of the jobs “probably” will work well with a preconceived flat rate. It’s the outliers that are the real problem; overcharging for mid-day, or departing prior to sunrise.

What – This can range from a single notarization on a Deed to a PiggyBack with four affiants on many, many pages. Add in some “Premium Services” such as Apostille, Legalization or Fingerprinting and the effort to completion increases dramatically. Or consider the more common requests for FAX backs, document printing, and waits for doc, status cell calls ……

DYGOOIWYPII – Do You Get Out Of It What You Put Into It?
Posting Prices – About two or three times a year someone asks why I do not post my fee schedule on my web site. Or, I receive an email asking for my fee schedule. Aint got one, never did; and I look with wonder at the few notary sites that post fees. It’s just too complicated. Considering the permutations available in Where What and When – a realistic and useful “rate sheet” would look like a cross between a Rail Road timetable and the pricing structure of most cable TV providers.

Now the Good News – Unless you are a flat rate fan (unlikely) you are already using a variation of “Effort Pricing”. You ask (prior to mentioning a fee) the key: Where, What and When. Keep taking those Ginkgo Biloba brain food pills. Assuming you get the WWandW you are going to have to calculate, you guessed it: your effort pricing. And, your client will expect a price quote rather quickly. Lotsa variables to take into account. The only tip that I can give is to process the Where and When at the same time; figure an effort fee. Then add your What fee – to arrive at a total. Be sure to let your client know that if the specs change, or there is a “surprise” that takes time/effort; the new data will probably up the cost. It’s not rocket science; take care to not commit yourself without knowing the 3Ws in detail. Get “burned” a few times and you will learn quickly.

Share
>

July 11, 2017

Was Larceny in Their Hearts?

Filed under: Ken Edelstein — admin @ 9:42 am

Was Larceny in Their Hearts?
The Offer – comes in a bit low for a one page notarization. The package would come via FedEx as a check to the affiant would be given after notarization of the deed. Then scan and email an image of the deed and lastly ship the original. Quite routine; and I counter with a slight increase due to the distant location; adding my “up front” PayPal requirement. The offer came from a state well known for, how can I put it delicately – mischief about making payments.

They Accept – the reply agrees to PayPal with the understanding that the assignment does not go on my calendar until payment is received (more about the “received” soon). About an hour later I receive an email from PayPal about payment being made using an “eCheck”. PayPal also includes the following statement:

“It usually takes about 3-5 days for you to receive the money. We recommend that you wait until the money arrives before shipping items. We’ll email you when this eCheck payment has been deposited into your account.”

Looking deeper – the signature on the received email offer did not include a web address. However the email was from a private domain, sender@whatever.com and I went to take a look at http://whatever.com. I found a nice site complete with a BBB logo proclaiming an A+ Accreditation – as the BBB says “that builds trust”. So, I click on that nice BBB logo.

If it don’t Link, it do Stink – I click the BBB logo and nothing happens! It’s just an image. If you go to http://kenneth-a-edelstein.com and click my BBB logo it takes you to my BBB listing. Well, knowing the address of the site “whatever.com” I go to the local (in their state) BBB and try to find a listing for whatever.com. Nada. It appeared they claimed a rating that does not exist.

My Polite Inquiry – I send an email with images of the BBB logo on the “whatever.com” site and an image of that URL (and the company name) not being found on the local BBB site and ask for “clarification”. As I write this I am really happy the inquiry was Polite! I suspected “fraud” but it’s best to remain civil and give the other side a chance to explain.

My Honest Client – the reply clarifies that the site is new, a branch of their existing (with a BBB link provided) initial site. The link does show an A+ and the same named person as Principal and Owner of both sites. It’s a go! I receive borrower contact info and make the call.

New Trouble – the affiant wishes to change the location from upper Manhattan to a distant address in the next county; somewhere in northern Queens County. I call, and inform that my fee will have to double; and offer an alternative. I give them the suggestion that they look by zip code on http://123notary.com for someone much closer. They agree, I issue a PayPal refund, which should stop the eCheck that was “in progress”.

The Take Away – It “appeared” at first that the client was a bit “shady”. However, when you know only one side, it’s really best to give the other side a chance to explain. I’m glad I did not send a scathing condemnation – I would have appeared quite the fool. Even though the job did not work out this time, I probably have landed a new client. Doing my “reasonable best” for their interests; with due consideration for mine, works for me. Lastly, now having experience with eCheck I clearly state that payment is on my site via PayPal is with a credit card.

Share
>

July 10, 2017

2020 – How the crash of the EU will affect the Notary Industry

Filed under: Marketing Articles — admin @ 9:48 am

2020 — the year the world begins to see straight about finance.
Abraham Lincoln once said that a house divided cannot stand. A house divided cannot stand for long — this is a true fact. The EU has about 28 economies within it, many of which are heavily in debt. Greece, Portugal, Iceland, and a few other countries are in a permanent state of being near the brink of default. Germany has been giving Greece some subsistence support in exchange for a little “austerity” or financial responsibility on the part of the Greeks. The fact is that many of the socialist countries, particularly in the Mediterranean do not like the idea of being financially responsible. They want to have extravagant benefits, and pay more out than they take in. In the real world, governments that wish to stay in business need more revenues than they have expenses, and they need savings. The same applies to individuals.

The debt scenario is likely to put a handful of EU countries in default, I estimate by around 2020. The problem is that France, Italy, Iceland, Portugal, Greece, and Spain are all on the list of potential defaulters. Three of the countries on that list are large and owe more than a trillion per piece. This default will cause some sort of a chain reaction and affect the economies of other European countries and world financial markets. The problem for us, is that our careers are based on services for the financial market — namely notary services on loans.

If the EU crashes financially, that could mean several possibilities for the Notary industry.

1. Lower Interest Rates >> More Refinances
World financial organizations will STOP lending to governments since governments will be found to be so unstable. Currently, financial institutions still have tremendous faith in most governments, but that can come crashing down like dominos the minute countries start to default one after the other. Financial institutions will either not lend at all (their business model is based on lending) or will lend to shoe with collateral, namely, people with houses. With many world governments out of the picture as competitors for loans, interest rates could fall, making a lot more work for Refinances possible.

2. A Housing and Oil Crash
It is also possible that the financial panic that results from multiple defaulting nations could stimulate a crash in the housing market leaving home owners with insufficient equity to borrow money. This would result in a slow-down in the already slow Refinance market and could kill the Reverse Mortgage market. Additionally, a crash in financial markets in Europe could lead to a bad depression in Europe. That could lead to a higher dollar due to a lack of faith in European currencies, lower oil prices due to lower world demand, and lower oil prices relative to the dollar due to a higher dollar. It would not surprise me if in 2020, gasoline is sold for $1.20 per gallon. Cheap petroleum could also lead to a spike in US airline profits. I

3. Recession & Lower Interest Rates
However, the depression in Europe which is a market for US goods could cause an economic slowdown in the USA. If there is a slowdown then businesses will not be borrowing as much money for expansion which means that home owners will have lower interest rates which means more Refinances.

What does Jeremy think?
I am not a psychic, although I use my psychic skills on the stock market and my accuracy has been aroun 57% if I meditate before I make predictions. 57% is great because that means I’m right almost 6 times for every 4 times I’m wrong which is good enough for regular profits.

A housing crash, low interest rates and a refusal to lend.
I believe that there will be a housing crash as a result of European financial crashes around 2019, 2020, or 2021. I cannot predict the exact year as each event hinges on another event preceding it causing a domino effect. I also believe there will lower interest rates combined with a paranoia of lending money to anyone. The paranoia that banks had from 2009 until the present about loaning to home owners will continue. Anyone without perfect credit or a high down payment or high equity will probably be denied a loan. Banks will be super picky about who they lend to. Gold could fluctuate quite a bit as people desperate for cash sell their gold and investors paranoid about security buy more gold.

1. Low Interest Rates >> A spike in Refinances to well qualified home owners
2. A Housing Crash >> A downturn in Reverse Mortgages due to low equity in homes after Real Estate downturn.
3. Low oil prices
4. Fluctuating gold prices that end up being higher than $2400 per ounce after 2022.
5. Debt ridden Mediterranean countries will default on loans one after the next. Other more stable governments will crash starting around 2025-ish too like Germany, Japan and possibly the USA (let’s hope not.)

Summary
My worst fear is an government financial collapse in the United States. That means your social security check will not come, you might not be able to retire, and all types of economic instability could come. This reality is the result of years of irresponsible financial behavior. If even half of the governments of the world would save instead of being permanently in debt, this global domino effect of government collapses wouldn’t be possible.. Hopefully humans will learn that usury is not a sin because some old guy with a beard who lived 4000 years ago said it is, but because out of control usury causes economic slavery, governmental dependency on other countries, as well as global economic crashes which ruin so many people’s lives. And as far as Notaries are concerned, the future of signing agent work from 2019 to 2030 is very shaky and uncertain. It might be more, less or about the same volume of work.

Share
>

July 7, 2017

5 New Official Notary Acts

Filed under: Humorous Posts — admin @ 8:50 am

My comedy writer and I decided that the existing Notary acts are boring, and that we should create some new and more interesting ones. So, here they are!

Notary Ax – For New Yorkers who can’t pronounce “notary acts.”

Adjustment: Swearing you signed the document on a certain date, but you wrote down the wrong date and it needs to be adjusted. If your notary is a chiropractor, you go for multiple adjustments. If your notary is a nude chiropractor, there are other cracks that have nothing to with adjustments.

Wine Certification – Certifying that a wine is good during a wine tasting. A particular wine had two notes but no closing disclosure, because the cork broke so they couldn’t close the bottle. Was it the wine that had a lot of notes, or the mortgage? Both.

Marriage Officiation – The form has to have room for both parties to sign. He and she. Or he and he. Or she and she. Thanks to the hes and shes on the Supreme Court who went for the hes and hes and shes and shes. Why was the lady’s mother pleased she married a mortgage broker? He had many good points.

Divorce Officiation – Where the notary executes a document to prevent the he and she, or he and he, or she and she, from executing each other.

Disavowment – A notary act where you swear you didn’t sign a document. “That’s not my signature. I didn’t sign that. It doesn’t even look like my signature. A bad forger must have did that!” “What happens when a forger gets his signature forged? Does that make it valid?”

Share
>

July 6, 2017

Monsanto Genetically modified Notaries

Filed under: General Stories — admin @ 9:14 am

I go shopping at Whole Foods, so products are sold as Non-GMO. But, can you request a non-GMO Notary as well? Or would the alternative be a GMO-tary? These new genetically modified Notaries have a newly designed gene that helps them show up on time, and gets them to study a little more so they will know the technical terms on the TRID.

Perhaps a new gene needs to be created to help signing companies pay people on time.

But, based on my experience, a gene that would help borrowers sign.

Speaking of genes. I learned that the indigenous European hunters and gatherers lived in Europe 7000-20000 years ago and all had dark skin and blue eyes. Then waves of people from Russia and Greece populated all of Europe. But the new waves of migrants from 4000-7000 years ago from Russia white skin and brown eyes — until they mixed blood with the hunter folks and the Mediterranean folks. So, I guess I am related to the hunters since I have blue eyes — AND, I like to eat meat right off the bone with my hands and say MEAT!!! really loudly!

But, back to signing companies. I also learned on youtube, that signing companies that pay three months late have a recessive gene that makes them so sluggish — so, there is hope.

The fax-back gene is still being worked on. People are studying this gene which is found in some populations from Croatia. The main gene marker dates back to 3000 years ago when a messenger was shot for bringing bad news. I guess messengers are sort of like archaic fax machines.

Share
>
Older Posts »