April 2018 - Notary Blog - Signing Tips, Marketing Tips, General Notary Advice - 123notary.com
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April 30, 2018

Who is getting clicks in 2018?

Filed under: Marketing Articles — admin @ 10:17 am

Interpreting clicks is complicated and is a loaded subject. Those who are certified by 123notary get more clicks than the others, however, many do not click on them for fear that they might be expensive which is a realistic fear. The numbers below are based on limited data as I did not want to spend all day long averaging numbers. It is just to give you some sort of an idea. Clicks do not translate directly into jobs. Certified members get more high paying jobs but do not necessarily get more clicks.

High Listings
Elite Members 1.75 clicks/day average
Certified 1.57 clicks/day average
Not Certified 1.59 clicks/day average
Poor Stats 1.23 clicks/day average (notaries with failing test scores)

Conclusion
Elite members have a definitive advantage as users regard them as being the masters of their trade which is true. Only 100 of our 6000 currently listed members are Elite Certified and it is very hard to pass the test. So, it really makes you stand out. Then there were people who miserably failed our notary quiz with around 40% or less who are getting a lot fewer clicks per day. There was no definitive difference between those who were not certified who did reasonably on the notary quiz and those who are certified. Users do not value knowledge of documents that much but do value general notary knowledge to a particular extent.

Medium Members
Elite 1.56 clicks per day
Cert 1.3 clicks per day
Uncert 1.2 clicks per day
Bad Stats .96 clicks per day (notaries with failing test scores)

Interpretation
This time there was measurable difference in the clicks of certified members and an even bigger increase in clicks for those who are elite certified. Those Notaries who failed our Notary test were distinctive in their low clicks as users do value basic knowledge. One of the reasons that our elite certification is not more valued is that the elite members are expensive, and still do not have a 100% knowledge of the notary process or documents even though they are close. Maybe with more refinement of my certifications they will get more weight.

It seems that the most important thing is to try to make sure Notaries score at least 50% on their notary quiz to ensure happy users on our site.

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You might also like:

How does pricing for top spots on 123notary work?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19355

Which Notary Directories get the high paying signings?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19201

Answering the call and then not wanting to talk
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19640

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April 29, 2018

Do I need $1 million (E&O) insurance to get more Notary business?

Do I need $100,000 or $1 million in Errors & Omission (E&O) insurance to get more Notary business?
It is not uncommon for some companies to require that a Notary have more than the standard amount of E&O Insurance. There is no state mandated minimum for E&O unlike a Notary Bond where the law requires every Notary to file an official bond for $15,000 which is designed to pay limited claims against the Notary Public.

But please make no mistake. All Notaries must carry some form of E&O insurance to protect themselves from unintentional errors and omissions they make. Of course, E&O policies will not cover fraudulent acts or intentional errors. Without E&O Insurance, you will have to pay for the cost of the judgment or settlement and your own legal expenses. The financial impact can force a Notary to renounce his/her Notary commission and possibly even declare bankruptcy depending upon then severity of the error.

The high coverage of an E&O policy is based on the false perception that the companies would get a better class of Notary or that they are protected from any and all errors made by the Notary. This is farthest from the truth. I have more than 20 years of experience being a Notary and have never increased my E&O Insurance above the standard amount of $15,000/- primarily for 2 reasons. First, the number of companies requiring $100,000 or even $1 million in E&O Insurance are few and far between and the number of jobs that a Notary gets does not make up for the increased premium for the additional coverage. Second, the E&O policy only covers clerical errors and does not cover any fraudulent acts committed by the Notary. As a matter of practice, I double and sometimes triple check my work and am always cautious of the people who appear before me for a notarization. More importantly, I never do anything that even has the appearance of a scam or fraud. I have no intention of being someone’s boyfriend with no escape clause!!

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You might also like:

The 30 point course – beneficial interest and E&O Insurance
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=14532

Posts about E&O Insurance
http://blog.123notary.com/?tag=eo-insurance

Help, I’m being sued, and E&O insurance won’t help!
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=3570

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April 28, 2018

Snapdocs has a good algorithm, but…

Filed under: Signing Company Gossip — Tags: — admin @ 10:36 am

Snapdocs has a good algorithm that sorts their Notaries well. The better ones are on top based on their reviews and performance and how recently they logged in. But, some of them are no longer in business unfortunately. Snapdocs lets you know if they have logged in during the last 45 days, but beyond that it is a crap shoot. There are many has beens on that site. Hmmm. The other problem is that their best Notaries are not that great and the general overall quality of Notaries on their site is dismal, but their technology is super.

I guess the various sites have different business models.

Snapdocs focuses on great technological platforms.
123notary focuses on having the best Notaries.
NotaryRotary has the closest Notaries and also has many high quality Notaries.
Signingagent.com has the best quantity of Notaries and NNA Certified, but not necessarily experienced or serious.

So, for each need, there is a niche in the market. The problem is that there are so many tens of thousands of mobile notaries, it is hard to keep track of all of them.

The other thing about Snapdocs that is interesting is that they show you Notaries who are really close to the job. Normally within 12 miles. That is great, but in areas where there aren’t so many Notaries you might not get so many good choices, and if you did, the choices would be too far. I guess it is hard to win.

123notary has the opposite problem. We list people who serve particular areas regardless of how far away they are, within reason. If they are more than 60 miles away, I generally do not list people that far unless it is a very remote area.

So, who provides the best search? I guess that depends on your search needs!

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April 27, 2018

Miami Vice — a shipment of illegal notary seals

Filed under: Sit-Coms — admin @ 10:37 am

CHIEF: Sonny, you need to take care of this. There’s a shipment of illegal Notary seals coming in, but we have no intel on it. Can you handle it?

SONNY: I’m on it. But, I don’t have any reliable sources.

RICO: We’ll use any sources we can get. But, we do have something. Remember Nuggie?

SONNY: Oh God, him again? I’m on it.

(Rico and Sonny travel downtown)

RICO: Let’s get a Cuban cafe first and then find out guy.

SONNY: Deal. I just hope our Ferrari is safe. We’ll keep it in eye distance. Besides it has an alarm.

RICO: Dos cafes cubanos por favor. Y rapido tambien. (Two Cuban coffes, and make it fast!)

(gunshots ring out)

SONNY: Get down….. (pause) I think our plan has a hole in it. Make that a coffee cup with a hole in it. I’ll call it in. (ring ring) Hey, there were gun shots on Sunset BLVD. We have no idea what it was about, but the car sped off and they’re gone now.

GINA: Okay. You can finish your coffee now.

SONNY: How did you know we were having coffee?

GINA: Oh, just a hunch. Call it women’s intuition.

NUGGIE: Hey man, how are my boys doing. The Nug-man has arrived, and arrived in style. Check out my new shades. My new wife bought me these. Ha ha!!! Don’t keep me long because the Nuggie has to Boogie, you dig?

SONNY: We dig. Listen. Do you know anything about a shipment of illegal Notary seals coming into Miami harbor on a freighter in the next few days.

NUGGIE: That all depends on who and how much is asking.

SONNY: Rico, do you have a hundred?

RICO: Here’s two Ben Franklins. This one’s important.

NUGGIE: Oh, allright. Benjamin is doing the asking in repetition. All I know if that a guy named Sanchez is moving some heavy cargo from the Dominican Republic. Word on the street is that they have a seal forging plant over there and the action is hot and humid. You dig?

RICO: Do you know anything about where and when? Or a last name?

NUGGIE: He’s in his late 40’s, Cuban and has a mustache last time I checked. His organization prefers to use fishing boats, but they switch things up quite a bit to keep the authorities guessing.

RICO: Thanks Nuggie, you’ve been a huge help.

SONNY: (ring ring) Gina, do you have any intel on a guy named Sanchez who smuggles using fishing boats.

GINA: Last I heard, he was smuggling fishing boats. What a great cover.

SONNY: Very funny. Do you have anything.

GINA: We have a profile on the guy I think you are talking about. We have names, addresses, and rap sheets.

SONNY: Great, we’ll get the bug van and see if we can pick up some knowledge tapping some phones.

(3 hours later)

VAN GUY: We got the van set up. Sanchez’s crew are in the address we are in front of. They are talking about all types of things. But, they have only mentioned stampers once. I guess by that they mean Notary Seal.

SONNY: Anything about a time or place?

VAN GUY: Nothing yet.

(six hours later)

VAN GUY: (ring ring) We got a time. Noon tomorrow, there’s going to be a transfer from one fishing boat to several inflatable motor boats. Real little ones. They will be carrying the merchandise underwater in bags. if there is any trouble, the seals will sink to the bottom and there will be no evidence unless you have frog guys.

RICO: I know how to dive. I’ll handle this.

VAN GUY: They put a big rock in the bag, so we will have to bring a decompression suit just in case you dive too deep.

TRUDY: Don’t we need a Navy Seal for this, instead of a Notary Seal. It sounds too dangerous for Rico. And where will he hang his suit when he’s diving?

RICO: I’m not worried about that because my wet suit comes with a wet tie, and matching spear gun just in case I need it.

GINA: Hey Sonny, remember that shooting when you were having Cuban coffee? I just found out that was not just a random shooting. That was a competitor of the guy you are chasing named Rubio. They have their own channels for selling fake Notary seals, and are moving in on the supplier.

SONNY: Change of plans guys. We are going to set up a rendevous between Rubio and Sanchez. Either they kill each other, or we can arrest all of them all in one meet. Rico, you pretend to be one of Rubio’s guys and set up the meet. In the ocean. The dress code is wet suits.

RICO: I’m on it.

(nine hours later — at the meet in the ocean. Rubio’s guys try to hijack the merchandise. There is a shoot out. Half of Rubio’s guys are killed and retreat at high speed far away. Sanchez’s guys do not follow. After Rubio’s guys move out, Miami Vice moves in.)

RICO: Freeze, Miami Vice.

(Sanchez’s guys drop the Notary seals into the water. Rico jumps into the water with his spear gun)

VICTOR: Bubble bubble bubble

RICO: You don’t really bubble bubble mean that bubble.

(A secret deal was going on under water. There were five guys in wet suits with underwater guns. But, the Notary seals they were selling were underwater notary seals used by Jacque Cousteau.)

RICO: I’m going to need bubble up, I mean back bubble up. There are fbub-bub-bub-ive of them and only one of me.

SONNY: Damn it. I never thought of that. Ugh!!!!

RICO: But, I brought an underwater charge. I come prepared for this kind of thing mon.

(boom… meanwhile Sanchez’s guys bubble to the surface all disoriented after the underwater blast. Miami Vice has them at gun point. Sanchez puts a gun to his own head because he doesn’t want to go back to jail.

SONNY: Don’t do it. Just put the gun down.

SANCHEZ: I am never going back to jail again. I have had enough. (bang)

SONNY: No!!!!!!!!

After that, the seals were returned to the Florida Notary commission who did not want the seals because they said, “State of Florida, County of Underwater.”

(meanwhile back on Sonny’s boat)

RICO: That was quite a bust. I’ve never seen anything like it. Not in New York, not here. What’s up with your alligator, he is trying to eat his chain.

SONNY: I call it a classic case of “areptile disfunction.”

RICO: Ha ha ha ha ha. Good one.

.

You might also like:

A Notary travels from Florida to India
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19636

Psych Notary Episode. Did the body die of food poisoning or was he murdered?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19397

Notaries in cars getting coffee
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=18945

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April 26, 2018

A Notary who didn’t know his counties

Filed under: General Stories — admin @ 10:43 am

There once was a Notary who did not know his counties. He thought he went to Orange, Richardson, and Caldwell Counties. Then, he discovered after he finished an early morning signing that there were hot springs nearby. He locked up his Notary seal in his trunk, put his clothes in the locker, and then went for a dip. The water was far too hot. After this harrowing experience, the Notary wrote to the county clerk to have them change the county name from Caldwell to Scaldwell.

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April 25, 2018

Preparing to Sign a Last Will and Testament

Filed under: Technical & Legal — admin @ 11:11 am

Preparing to Sign a Last Will and Testament

One of the most important documents that a person signs during the course of a lifetime is his or her last will and testament. Of course, ensuring that a last will and testament is drafted properly is crucial. However, ensuring that a last will and testament is valid does not end when the instrument has been written. The manner in which the document is signed is vital to its ultimate validity.

State Laws Govern Drafting and Signing a Last Will and Testament

Each individual state has its own laws as they pertain to the drafting and signing of a last will and testament. With that said, many states utilize a derivation of what is known as the Uniform Probate Code. In other words, although there are some minor differences from one state to another when it comes to a will, there is a great deal of commonality in the laws about wills across the United States.

In order to make certain that a last will and testament is appropriately drafted and properly executed, a person does need to check the specific laws of the state in which the will is signed. This is the only way in which compliance with the law can be confirmed.

The Role of a Notary Public at a Will Signing

A notary public plays a pivotal role in the execution or signing of a last will and testament. One of the power bestowed upon a notary public is the ability to administer oaths and confirm information in certain situations. For example, at the time of the signing of a last will and testament, a notary public is charged with confirming a number of factors before a person signs the instrument.

First, a notary public is required to confirm that the person about to sign his or her last will and testament understands what is contained in the instrument. A notary public doesn’t quiz the signer on the contents of the instrument. Rather, a notary public requires the signer to affirm that he or she has read the instrument and understands its contents.

Second, a notary public must concern that based on his or her reading of a last will and testament that the instrument does what the signer intends. In other words, the signer must affirm that the last will and testament deals with matters associated with his or her estate in the manner in which he or she intents and desires.

Third, a notary must ascertain that the signer of a last will and testament is of sound mind and body at the time of the execution of the instrument.

Finally, when the person signing a last will and testament executes the document, a notary public verifies the signature and affixes the seal of his or her office to the instrument.

Witnesses at a Will Signing

The laws of all states mandate that witnesses be present at the execution of a last will and testament. The laws do differ as to how many witnesses must be on hand at the signing of a last will and testament.

The witnesses are present to confirm that the person executing a last will and testament understands what he or she is doing, that he or she is signing the will as a free and voluntary act, and that the signer is of sound mind and body.

The witnesses can end up playing a pivotal role should the day ever come that a last will and testament is being challenged in some manner. For example, the witnesses might be called upon to testify in court if a challenge is made to the will after the signer of the instrument dies. The witnesses might be called upon to testify that the signer was of sound mind and body when the last will and testament was executed.

At the time of the execution of a last will and testament, a notary ensures that the witnesses understand their roles. The witnesses sign the instrument, after the signer of the will itself completes that task. A notary typically verifies the signatures of the witnesses to the last will and testament as well.

Generally speaking, a last will and testament usually is signed in the office of the attorney that drafted the instrument in the first instance. More often than not, the attorney will have a notary public available from his or her own staff. There are rare situations in which a notary public is called in from the outside to witness and notarize the signing of a last will and testament.

 
Jessica Kane is a professional blogger who focuses on personal finance and other money matters. She currently writes for Checkworks.com, where you can get personal checks and business checks.

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April 22, 2018

If your listing has been paused by 123notary

Filed under: Advertising — admin @ 10:34 am

There has been a lot of drama recently, and a lot of rabble rousing on the forums about my more disciplinary behavior recently. So, I feel I owe it to the group to explain what is going on.

In 2004 when I first created the policies page, the rule was that you had to login every 120 days. If not, we would contact you and then remove you id you did not login in 150 days. It was left unstated if there was any possibility you would be removed on day 120, but you had to login within 120 days. Removal was temporary, and a simple email to me would get you back online.

We also created another policy under the term “Service” on our policies page. This term says that I reserve the right to refuse service to anyone. I anticipated having a few psychos that I would need to kick off. I got many more psychotic maniacs than I thought I would.

In the last nine months, 123notary has sent autocalls to p#7-12 people in groups letting them know they should login. These reminders were every few months and were ignored. Most listings were ones that I logged in for the notary and left a note in my records of what had happened. But, many with very low scores on their Notary test were temporarily removed.

The reason they were removed was because they did not know how to be a Notary. I used the 120 no update rule as a way to soften the blow so I would not hurt anyone’s feelings that much or at all.

Recently I have had a few people email pages of my policy page or related pages that may have been antiquated. Although we remove listings for failing to login as a matter of practice. The recent removals can fall into the category of me as a matter of written policy reserving my right to remove someone on the basis that they did not know how to do their job.

Additionally, we created a new policy requiring Notaries to be able to score 70% on our Notary quiz. Very few Notaries were able to attain that low score while the average was 45%. I cannot remove all Notaries from my site, so I only removed the very worst ones.

Basically, you can argue all you like, kick and scream. But, to ensure integrity to the public which is a priority to me, I need Notaries who study Notary procedure and are fluent on the language of Notary. Most of you have to think long and hard about the most basic of Notary knowledge, or procedure which is unbelievable. For shame.

Conclusion
There are three policies that you need to concern yourself with, and they are not necessarily listed in the same place, although we are fixing that.

1. Login every 120 days.
2. Score 70% on our Notary test
3. I reserve the right to refuse service to anyone.
So, please act polite and know your job well because I am tired of removing people for disciplinary or competency reasons and tired of the drama.

My job is not only to provide education and advertising to Notaries, but also to protect the public from bad Notaries. So, please do not be a bad Notary anymore assuming you are a bad Notary. And if you are a bad notary who is under the delusion that you are a great notary, then give yourself a little quiz on Notary vocabulary, acts and practices and see how you do.

IF you were removed, email us at info@123notary.com and we can discuss the terms for relisting you. If your term is not up, you would not owe payment, but might owe us passing a test or promising to login.

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April 20, 2018

A Notary sees a UFO

Filed under: Virtual Comedy Themes — admin @ 10:38 am

NOTARY: I saw a UFO, I really did, I really did.

SAL: Sure you did pal, we all saw it too…. not…

NOTARY: No, you gotta understand. I really saw it. It had lights and everything.

(The next day — the notary is coming home from an appointment. He sees lights and a UFO coming down from the sky slowly.)

NOTARY: Are you going to abduct me.

ALIEN: No, but can you like us on Facebook?

NOTARY: Yesterday, I saw a UFO on my way back from a Notary job, and nobody believed me.

ALIEN: We can do something about that. We’ll reverse the situation. He Quantum, get the memory erasing device.

QUANTUM: Here it is.

ALIEN: (zip sound) Go back to your home earthling.

(Then, the space ship circled around town making a huge profile of itself.)

SAL: Hey, did you see that UFO. Everybody saw it. You were right.

NOTARY: I don’t remember seeing it. I think my memory blacked out that night. There seem to be three hours missing from my day yesterday. I have no idea what happened. I just remember a cornfield.

SAL: What are those strange marks on your neck. Did they inject you with something?

NOTARY: Oh God. I’ll have to see that shrink and go into a trance to figure out what happened.

(The next day… the spaceship returns.

NOTARY: Are you going to abduct me?

ALIEN: Actually, we need these forms notarized. We have an intergallactic driver license. It is a government issued photo ID and expires in the earth year 3026.

NOTARY: Uh-huh. I cannot accept that partly because it has no issue date in earth years and also because you Aliens all look alike.

ALIEN: Hey, I resent that, I’m way better looking than Quazar over here even though I’m 300 years older. I’m actually 412.

NOTARY: Really, you don’t look a day over 399. Oh my God, what are we talking about. What am I doing here. But, if we can go into a time warp, California used to allow notarizing Jurats without ID back in 2001.

ALIEN: No problem, we have that technology but rarely use it. Unfortunately your seal would not have been issued in that date.

NOTARY: I kept the old one.

ALIEN: We are in business. Go and get it!

NOTARY: The main thing is that instead of me being the only one to see a UFO, this time around, everybody else saw it except me. Go figure.

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April 18, 2018

The World History of Notaries

Filed under: General Stories — admin @ 11:13 am

The World History of Notaries

If you are like most people, who have at least passing familiarity with notary publics. Indeed, odds are that if you are an adult, you have had to have some type of document notarized at some juncture. With that said, if you are also like most people, you know little about the functioning or history of notary publics. In fact, the history of these officials is an interesting jaunt through time.

Origins of Notaries

Notaries public tracer their origins back to the days of the ancient Roman Republic, even before the days of what is perhaps the better known Roman Empire. During this era, notaries went by different titles, monikers that no longer exist today. These included scribae, tabelliones forenses, or personae publicae. Sometimes notaries from this time period are referenced as scribes, although that title is actually more inclusive and covers individuals that include notaries but others as well.

The office of a notary in ancient Rome represented a type of scribe that rose in rank after distinguished service. Initially, at the bottom tier of scribes in ancient Rome were recorders of facts and judicial proceedings as well as copiers and transcribers to a learned profession prominent in private and public affairs.

As scribes moved upward, some were permanent officials that served the powerful Roman Senate. Other notaries were attached to Roman courts of law. These notaries had the duty of recording public proceedings, transcribing state papers, supplying magistrates with legal forms, and registering the decrees and judgments of the magistrates.

The End of the Roman Republic, the Birth of the Roman Empire

During the final years of the Roman Republic, likely at the time of Cicero, a new form of shorthand was developed. This new form of writing was called notae. A writer who adopted the new style of writing was called a notarius. Eventually, the title notarius was applied nearly always to registrars attached to high government officials. These included provincial governors and secretaries to the Roman Emperor.

Collapse of the Western Empire

A tumultuous even occurred when the Western Empire collapsed in the 5th century. During this time period, the notary retained his status as an important figure throughout continental Europe. This lasted throughout the Dark Ages.

The Renaissance

By the 12th century, civil law experienced its renaissance. At this point in history, the notary became what was considered a central institution. The position still exists in a similar manner today in many countries vis-à-vis their civil law traditions.

The office of the notary public reached something of a zenith in the 12th century in the Italian city of Bologna. The most distinguished notary of the Renaissance is said to be a man named Rolandino Passeggeri. He is more commonly known as Rolandino of Bologna. He is responsible for what is considered a masterwork that is called the Summa Artis Notariae.

The Development of Common Law in England

The institution or office of the notary public did not see its introduction in England until the latter part of the 13th and 14th centuries. Initially, notaries in England were appointed by the official representative of the Holy See, known as the Papal Legate. Ultimately, in 1279, the Archbishop of Canterbury was authorized by the Pope to appoint notaries.

During this time period, many notaries were members of the clergy. Over time, the clergy became far less involved in commercial transactions and notaries primarily were laypersons.

The Protestant Reformation resulted in no significant change in the position and functions of notaries in England. In 1533, the Ecclesiastical Licences Act 1533 was enacted. This law permanently terminated the power of the Pope to appoint notaries. The power to appoint notaries was in the King. The King, in turn, transferred that power to the Archbishop of Canterbury. The Archbishop then assigned the notarial power to the Court of Faculties and the Master of the Faculties.

From England to the United States

In England, notaries recorded matters of judicial importance and private transactions. This practice has carried forth into the United States today. A notary public in the U.S. is an individual appointed by a state government. The primary role of a notary today is to serve as an impartial witness when important documents or instruments are signed or executed.

The laws governing notaries public are enacted by the legislatures in each individual state. As a result, although there is a great deal of similarity in the functions of a notary public from state to state, there are some differences as well.

Jessica Kane is a professional blogger who writes for Faxage a leading company that provides Internet fax service for individuals and businesses.

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April 17, 2018

How often do Notaries end up in court?

Filed under: Technical & Legal — Tags: — admin @ 10:24 am

Notaries can end up in court for a variety of reasons. If the person you notarized used a fake ID and you did not thumbprint them, you are likely to end up in court. If a borrower is suing the Lender and wants to sue all involved, you could end up in trouble. If you explain something poorly and the signer feels you are denying a legitimate request for service and they miss a deadline and experience a loss — you can end up in court.

Here are some ways to increase your likelihood of ending up in court:

1. Not keeping a journal
2. Doing hospital or elder notarizations (even if you are cautious)
3. Not taking journal thumbprints
4. Not explaining notary requirements clearly to irate customers who will lose big bucks if you refuse them service.
5. Doing a notarization for someone who happens to be in a court building at the time of notarization (sorry, bad example.)

So, bad communication and record keeping skills are the prime reason people get in legal trouble as a Notary.

One in seven full-time Notaries who we have spoken to (rough estimate) have ended up in court at least once. Having good records makes it a lot easier for judges and investigators. So, when we ask you to keep a journal, we are not doing that just to put another burden on you. It is for safety reasons — your safety and the public’s safety.

If someone copies your seal and impersonates you the notary and notarizes something, if you don’t have a journal of what you actually did in real life every day — then you will not be able to prove to a judge that you did not notarize that phony notarization and you can get in trouble or even end up in jail. So, if you don’t like jail, keep a journal. That is a far fetched worst case scenario, but you could get in bad trouble. So, keep a journal even if your state says you don’t have to because the FBI doesn’t play games and neither should you. And FBI is FEDERAL and they work in all states regardless of whether your state requires a journal.

.

You might also like:

13 ways to get sued as a Notary
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19614

10 risks to being a Mobile Notary Public
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19459

he FBI is at your door and names you as a suspect!
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20013

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