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September 27, 2019

Facebook comments down to almost none

Filed under: Social Media — admin @ 10:35 pm

In the old days, our Facebook used to be such a medium for Notary conversation. But, Notaries little by little slowed down their commentary on our Facebook page. Our Forum slowed down many years ago and never came back up. We might get one post per day. How sad and sluggish. Maybe on day the industry will pick up, but for now it is really slow and sad in terms of social media. I have put such hard work into blogging, Facebook and a little work on Twitter that I just feel sad.

On the other hand, perhaps there are topics that people would be more apt to comment on? The posts people comment on tend to be divisive, political and controversial and the comments tend to be rude, because Americans cannot and will not be polite discussing differences. Sad. I guess I sound like Trump saying that — but, the guy has a point.

So, let’s hope for the best in terms of Facebook.

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7 ways to use Facebook to market your notary services
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April 14, 2013

7 ways to use Facebook to market your notary services

Filed under: Social Media — Tags: , , , — admin @ 7:35 am

“The Dalai Lama likes Edna’s Notary Services.”

That would be an endorsement any businessperson would ki–errr…work very, very hard for. Though it is unlikely that His Holiness would indicate a preference for any one notary service over another, almost anything is possible when you use Facebook wisely.

1. Envision the Future. What do you want to get out of your online presence, and your Facebook presence in particular? Do you want more customers? Do you want to raise your status in the notary community? Do you want to promote certain causes related to your business? Your plan determines the cost and amount of resources needed to use Facebook as a marketing tool.

2. Do not rely on Facebook alone. Just as you would not rely on an attack cat as the sole component of your home security system, you should not rely on the world’s largest social media platform as your only means of promotion. Every business needs a website, and every business website should have its own domain name, for example: ednasnotarypublic.com, as opposed to www.bighugenotarysite.org/ednasnotarypublic. Domains cost in the low-to-
mid two digits annually, and you can just build a free blog site on WordPress or Blogger and point your domain to that. Your website should contain easily accessible contact information, directions, a list of services, and regularly updated News and/or Blog sections.

3. Create a Facebook page. It’s free, it’s easy, and Facebook walks you through the process with pretty pictures. Start here.

4. Promote your site from your Facebook page. Unless your website features copious amounts of nudity, your Facebook page is likely to see the most traffic of your online endeavors. But as the primary means of Facebook communication are short status updates (which may include links) and image or video posts, your website is the place for blog posts, file downloads, and types of content that you are unable to offer via a Facebook page. Whenever you update your website, post a link to the new content on Facebook. Be sure to use images in your website content, as this creates a more compelling Facebook post.

5. Get “Like”d. There are few things as uplifting in this modern age as a Facebook “Like.” When someone Likes your page, it is posted on their wall (see paragraph one of this post) for all their friends to see, admire, and emulate. Begin your quest for Likes by Liking other pages–other notary services for sure, but mainly target people, businesses, and organizations that reflect the type of customers you desire and/or those that reflect or compliment the values and mission of your business. The more Likes you give, the more you are likely to receive, Grasshopper.

6. Update regularly. In the case of a small notary business, every two to three days is a good rule of thumb. Let’s be honest–most folks do not want five updates a day from their notary. Your updates can be links to your own site, links to sites of interest to your preferred customer base, an event your business is hosting, a quote from one of history’s great notaries, a photo of a particularly fetching seal, or anything that will catch someone’s eye. Remember to use images
whenever possible.

7. Use Facebook Ads. Up until now, you have not had to pay Facebook one thin dime. All that is about to change. Facebook Ads let you create ads that target customers according to your criteria.

Al Natanagara is a writer, journalist, and blogger whose career includes stints with ZDNet, CNet, CBS, LexisNexis, and Law Enforcement. http://www.findatitlecompany.com/

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July 17, 2012

Fees at the door MISUNDERSTOOD on Facebook

Fees at the door MISUNDERSTOOD on facebook 

Tisk tisk: notaries on Facebook.  You mostly misunderstood my discussion question about getting fees at the door for signings to prevent beneficial interest. this discussion took place in Jan 2012. I was NOT talking about loan signings.  At Loan signings they pay you three or four months AFTER the signing if you are lucky, not in cash at the signing. It is very obvious that I was talking about doing a traveling notary job for an individual person.  The problem is that most of you depend solely on loan signings for your living when there are many jobs for individuals which you either don’t know how to handle or reject because you are not familiar with it.
 

A typical botched jail notary job
Let’s say you drive 45 minutes to a jail to meet the girlfriend of a criminal.  You meet her in the parking lot or in the front door of the jail.  Let’s say you don’t collect your travel fee of $50 at the door.  Let’s say that hypothetically you walk to the guard, fill out the forms, but lo and behold, the prisoner has been moved to another jail 90 miles away.  Then you say, may I have my travel fee please.  The girlfriend says, “BUT YOU DIDN’T DO ANYTHING”.  And then you say, “Sure I did, I drove 45 minutes, talked to you on the phone, walked in here, and now I have to drive 45 minutes back home, and also go to the gas station which takes more time and money.  Pay up!!!  You will get stiffed, because they will feel that they do not owe you if you didn’t quote unquote DO ANYTHING. 
 

Yet another hospital notary job
Let’s say you drive an hour to a hospital at 3am to accommodate some desperate people.  You don’t get your travel fee at the door in cash like I recommend.  You go upstairs with the signer’s son in law only to find that the signer is on morphene, fast asleep, and in no position to sign anything or even sit up.  You ask for your travel fee for your 2 hour round trip, and the son in law says, “Sorry, but I’ll pay you when you come back next time, I didn’t realize that the nurse drugged Shelly’s dad”.  You just got stiffed again.
 
This isn’t rocket science. If you work with the public, they will leave you high and dry if you don’t protect yourself.
 
3rd example… beneficial interest
Lets say you go to a notary job.  You do NOT collect travel fees up front. Let’s say that the signer’s name on their ID doesn’t match the name on the document enough for you to legally or ethically notarize them.  They say, “Oh come on — you are being unreasonable”.  They say they won’t pay you a penny unless you notarize the signer. They have you by the balls because you didn’t think ahead.  If you have the travel fee up front, then you are in control and will not be persuaded under duress to break the law so you can get your lousy fee!
 
Last example:  The law office.
You are called into a law office 10 minutes away. You are instructed to show up at 1pm for a signing. Your trip fee is $30 and your waiting time fee is $20 per half hour with the first ten minutes complementary.  Let’s say that you never collected your $30.  The attorney says they won’t be ready for another 10 minutes.  But, 10 becomes 20, and 20 becomes an hour, and then finally after 90 minutes, you finally do the signing, and then they pay you, but they won’t pay for the waiting time.  If you had gotten your $30 at the door, you could threaten to leave if they don’t pay the wait time up front for each 30 minute increment.  If you don’t have the trip fee, you have no leverage. This has happened half a dozen times to me in my notary career!

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Travel fees if nothing gets signed
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January 23, 2011

Notaries on Facebook groups — the blind leading the blind

Filed under: Social Media — Tags: , — admin @ 10:31 am

I hear this from multiple sources. There are a lot of Notaries on a lot of private Facebook groups who get together and bash people. I am one of the people who gets bashed the most because those Notaries were rude to me or failed my test, or both. If you are rude to me, I normally let it slide the first time, but if you just don’t stop, then I get forceful in return and then the Notaries who receive my reciprocal wrath run to Facebook (like babies) to slander me. This is a pattern that has been going on a lot in the last year, and somewhat less before that. You can’t just cause trouble, run away and stab someone in the back online. Those type of people get kicked off my site, get no work and drop out of the industry — it is their karma.

Asking Questions on Facebook
Since bad Notaries hate me, and wouldn’t turn to their Notary Handbook for knowledge if God himself told them to at gunpoint, they resort to Facebook. I do not monitor my personal Facebook group, so asking questions there will get responses from those who do use it. This is a nice network for discussions and opinions, but not for law and practices related questions. Here is why asking questions on Facebook is a bad idea.

1. You do not know the competency or level of experience of the person answering you. Even those with 20 years signing experience fail my test the majority of the time. So, the more experience you have, the worse you usually are. You get stuck in this industry since no other industry will have you. You don’t even know the identity of the person you are corresponding with on Facebook either.

2. People who use Facebook will give you wrong answers to Notary questions more than half the time and probably give you bad marketing advice too.

3. People on Facebook do, however know where their business is coming from (if they keep track) and what the gossip is about who is paying, and who is mean (I am generally on that list even though I am nice to those who treat me with respect which is a factor never considered by slanderers.)

4. People on Facebook can tell you what their experience is. They might not interpret their experience in a way that makes sense, but they know what they experienced, and whether they liked it or not.

5. I recommend against asking technical questions on Facebook. The NNA, your Notary Division, or perhaps 123notary (we do not know state specific laws though.) are not bad entities to ask notary questions. 123notary steers people in the right direction all day long in many aspects of the notary profession. But, those on the private groups on Facebook choose to ignore our help which is free of charge and bash us instead. It tells you what type of people you are dealing with on the private groups.

Basically, private groups on Facebook are for frustrated low-IQ people to commiserate, bash people and exchange a lot of erroneous technical notary knowledge. I recommend that your first recourse is to consult your state notary handbook. The NNA might still have their hotline which has state specific knowledge. There are notary law primers available for most states. Additionally, there are many articles online about various notary topics — but beware, those articles might also have wrong or outdated information. So, if the information is for a job that has legal liability, your state is the only official source for up to date and correct information — not Facebook.

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August 12, 2019

Do your homework

Filed under: Carmen Towles — admin @ 11:31 pm

It never ceases to amaze me how many folks get into this business and don’t know ANYTHING about it. All folks seem to know is that someone came to their house with their loan paperwork and it looks easy enough and they burst out, “Hey, I could do this too! And then proceed to ask; “How do you get into this business?’. And they actually expect you to give them all the little details of the ends and outs of how to get into the business so they can TAKE all of your business. Never, once thinking that this might be improper because why would any of us really want to train our own competition? But some of us do (being nice and all that) but end up regretting it later due to our own demise.

Recently, I was reading a notary forum post about how easy we make it look and that we need to stop this immediately because all we are doing is saturating our areas with more and more notaries that are really not needed. It’s all about supply and demand. Unfortunately, at the time of me writing this there is no real demand for us notaries in this profession. Up until recently rates were steadily going up (went down a little as the writing of this blog) and the real estate markets seem to currently be a little sluggish. But none of this stops the constant flow of signing agents still flocking to the business like fly’s on you know what.

The other contributing factor in over saturation is that you have several places that offer loan signing classes with no regard that they are consistently over saturating the market with notary signing agents that will NEVER see any meaningful work. Just this week alone, I have spoken with a few notaries in various parts of the county that have been at it for months but still no work. Or if they do have any at all it is in limited supply. And the fees are paltry at best. I mean who wants to do a full loan package with scan backs for 65.00??? Please try NOT accept these low fees. It hurts us all.

A piece of advice, you must do your research BEFORE you jump into this profession. Don’t just jump in without knowing what you are getting into first. Check the number of notaries in your area. It might be worthwhile to join some facebook groups and read our forum here at 123notary.com as well as Notary Notary to gain some prospective on the business. There is WAY more to being a notary signing agent than meets the eye.

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July 23, 2019

How to choose a Lawyer for your legal needs

Filed under: Other Guest Bloggers — admin @ 8:41 am

Choosing a lawyer in this day and age is very tough as more people start to put up their portfolios and work experiences online. If you are looking for a lawyer to pursue a legal case, it is imperative that you go through a series of different checks before making your decision. Law is a very sensitive field and one that requires the attorney to have hands- on experience of handling a case. In this article, I will guide you through some important things you need to keep in mind when hiring a lawyer.

Ways to choose a lawyer:

1. Check his/her experience
Experience is the first requirement of this field. Don’t choose a minor to fight your case. Keep in mind that people who have hands-on experience of dealing cases in courts know it all. A newbie will not be able to navigate your case the way you would want it to. If you are hiring Bergman Legal lawyers, you can easily consult the company to check the experience of the attorney. Once you are satisfied with the working experience of the lawyer in the category you are looking for, make your decision.

2. Check social media profile
Most people have active social media profiles through which they contact their customers. In this day and age, with social media platforms such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Pinterest, YouTube; you can easily confirm the veracity of the services of a
prospective lawyer. Read customer reviews and precisely look for bad comments to check what went wrong. Some attorneys even have personalized websites dedicated to them through which you can register for their services conveniently.

3. Approachability is must
Don’t confirm an online deal without meeting your attorney. Keep in mind that the nature of some cases is so intense that frequent meetings need to be positioned between the
client and the lawyer. Don’t confirm the deal unless you haven’t met the attorney in person. Meeting him/her will also give you an idea about professionalism and work. Hire an attorney who lives close to your house or at least within the same city. If you hire a remotely located person, chances are very high that you both might engage in a verbal spat near future.

4. Ask for the fees payment mode
Everything that you discuss with the attorney must be written down. Nothing should be verbal. Especially the fees payment criteria should be written down so that there is absolute clarity between the two parties. Hire the person whose fees is in adherence to your budget. Hiring a highly paid attorney is going to get you in trouble if the money is
not paid on time. Also, confirm the payment mode in time. Ask the other person for installments if you can't pay the full fees in one go.

5. Conduct a background check
This is the most important thing that you need to do when choosing an attorney for your case. If you are hiring somebody through a registered firm, you will easily be able to get every detail of the person out on the paper. However, if you are randomly hiring a person online or after the first meeting, you will need to conduct a background check. This can be done easily. Just contact some of the previous clients who worked with the attorney.

Conclusion:
Lastly, when you are sure about a person’s ability to handle your case, just stick to our decision. Treat him/her well and speak your truth to that person.

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May 14, 2019

30 year rates took a dive in January giving new hope to struggling Notaries

Filed under: Marketing Articles — admin @ 11:10 am

Meet Jane in South Dakota who just got through a polar vortex. She suffered freezing pipes, the risk of frostbite, being stuck at home, not to mention not being able to get Ramen noodles.. you know, the oriental flavor that is so much fun to garnish with sliced celery and eat with chopsticks. Well, I bet these lower interest rates are a happy surprise to Jane. That means a sudden increase in Notary work, and might lead also to better weather.

123notary’s sales are up about 7% from last year. Facebook is still sluggish and the forum is almost dead though. But, there is hope, hope for a better future.

30 year interest rates went down below 4.5% for the first time since April 2018. The question is, will they stay this low or get lower? If so, then Notaries will get work. If they go up, I might have to learn how to import plastic buddhas from China and compete with buddhasforless.com and they are a tough competitor.

See this link for a graph of 30 year interest rates
https://ycharts.com/indicators/30_year_mortgage_rate

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March 24, 2019

Feast or famine in the Notary industry

Filed under: Marketing Articles — Tags: , — admin @ 10:26 am

For Notaries out there it is feast or famine.

Notary Cafe is a prime example of this. They publish stats on who is getting jobs and how many how recently. It is normally about 7% of the notaries give or take who are completely monopolizing the business while the others are going hungry. I guess people want to hire the good Notaries and forget the rest.

Our Facebook posts are the same. Certain posts get all the publicity while others get ignored.

On 123notary, the Notaries who are doing everything right get tons of business. But, how do we convince the newer Notaries how to get reviews, brush up their notes, and get certified? Few people listen, but those who do often prosper.

I just wonder what would happen if the industry picked up. Would companies have higher standards for Notaries and also pay more? Would the work be more equally spread out? Unfortunately, the way this business works, 1% of the notaries are experts, another 2% are not bad, 10% are somewhat reasonable, and the rest get a D or F. These are bad odds and create a type of pyramid where only the top of the pyramid gets lots of work and everybody else complains that they are not getting what they deserve. But, if you are a D or F, how much can you possibly deserve. Getting work at all is amazing if you don’t have solid industry related knowledge.

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March 11, 2019

Will & Grace — the mini notary seal

Filed under: Sit-Coms — Tags: , — admin @ 8:03 am

JACK: Will, can I ask you something?

WILL: What’s that?

JACK: Have you ever wanted to be a Notary?

WILL: Are there cute guys in that industry?

JACK: What does that have to do with anything. Get your mind out of the gutter. It doesn’t matter whose in the industry. You don’t hang around with other Notaries unless you go to those private Facebook groups. You meet clients and they might be cute.

WILL: How cute are we talking?

JACK: If I become a Notary, I’ll bring one of them to one of our favorite gay bars and you can find out.

WILL: What if they aren’t gay?

JACK: I don’t have to tell them it’s a gay bar.

GRACE: I think they’ll know…. duh. Remember you brought me to one of those places?

JACK: Yeah, but you said you wanted to go to a place where no man would give you any unwanted attention. You got what you asked for.

GRACE: What? (looking disgusted). That was NOT what I had in mind! I wanted to go to a lesbian bar. Oh well, next time.

JACK: If I were a Notary, I would want one of those tiny little seals and have a little tiny doggie to match… with an outfit.

WILL: An outfit for the dog or the seal?

JACK: Oh, now you’ve got me thinking. I could get a little seal cover designed just for my little seal.

GRACE: That’s so cute. You should become a Notary just for the little seal bag made out of yarn.

JACK: Yarn? I wasn’t thinking yarn. I was thinking leather!

WILL: Stick to yarn. It’s more cute. Plus you don’t want your customers to think you are into leather notarizations. That sort of thing has a stigma to it.

JACK: Good point. But, I don’t want people to think I’m grandma either.

WILL: Okay, I’m an Attorney, so I can give you an Oath.

JACK: Okay. Count me in.

WILL: Raise your right hand.

JACK: Okay (holding his hand parallel in a very gay way.)

WILL: Do you solemnly swear that you will uphold the laws for Notary Public for the state of New York and defend the constitution against all enemies foreign and domestic, so help you God?

JACK: What about imports, or is that what you meant by foreign, because I don’t drive, but if I did, I would only drive a Ford personally.

WILL: You’ll make a terrible Notary. If you want my advice. Don’t quit your day job.

JACK: Oh, you mean acting. Usually that’s what you say to people who won’t make it acting.

WILL: You’ll make it acting, you just won’t make it acting like a Notary.

JACK: Gee thanks. You’re so insensitive.

GRACE: I think he knows what he is talking about in the legal profession. That’s why I married him. My mother wanted me to marry an Attorney.

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December 18, 2018

Beginner Notaries 103 — Getting Work

Filed under: Technical & Legal — admin @ 2:51 am

Chapter 4. Getting Work
Return to table of contents – Beginner Notaries 103

Being a newer Notary, you have to get new contacts, learn new things, and work for whomever will take you. It is typical that you will be micromanaged, have to do a lot of faxing back, get paid poorly or in some cases not at all. This sounds like a horrible ordeal, but it is good because by paying your dues you will get experience. Any Notary who has succeeded had to pay their dues. Some paid more dues than others while a few with good legal contacts avoided the whole low-ball experience.

You need to call the companies who you signed up with regularly. Remind them that you exist and are ready to jump night or day. You can call signing companies, title companies, Attorneys offices, bail bonds offices, hospitals or anyone who needs a Notary. Let them know you are ready to work. You should mention you are a mobile notary on your facebook profile too because you never know who is reading it.

You should have a business card that you can give to your clients, their coworkers, family members, secretaries, etc. Repeat business is a big factor.

You can find signing companies on the signing company lists on 123notary and Notary Rotary. On 123notary our list is free to the public. On Notary Rotary you might need to be a member to see a lot of their information.

Knowing who to contact is half of the battle. The most important factor of getting work is being hungry and ready to please. Those who contact companies and brag about how smart they are are annoying. But, those who are ready to jump, answer the phone at all hours, and never complain are the ones who get jobs. Companies need you to get them out of a bind. If you are always their hero, you will get jobs. If you are always busy, tired, or unresponsive, you might not get jobs.

Once you get jobs, make sure to answer emails promptly and answer phone messages. If you keep people waiting for inquiries, or after service you will not get rehired.

Here is a list of companies that will hire new signers. But, the list was published a few years ago, and things have changed. These companies may or may not even still be in business.

Companies that will hire NEW signers!

Here is our general list of signing companies with reviews
http://www.123notary.com/signco.asp

Visit our forum where you can read about signing companies and more
http://www.123notary.com/forum/default.asp

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