Notary Jobs Archives - Notary Blog - Signing Tips, Marketing Tips, General Notary Advice - 123notary.com
123Notary

Notary Blog – Signing Tips, Marketing Tips, General Notary Advice – 123notary.com Control Panel

August 26, 2016

Startup Apps that could ruin the Notary business

If you think that technology is changing faster than you can deal with. You are right. But, the worst part is that new technology is putting a lot of Notaries out of business. Snapdocs makes it easy for companies to find low cost competition. 123notary is getting more clicks than it did when Snapdocs came around, but Notaries are complaining about the low cost competition. So, here are some new startups to watch out for.

Notaryz
This company makes it possible to get notarized via web-cam (not legal in many states) or get a Notary to come to you for $30 plus parking. Notaryz doesn’t encourage tipping, but they don’t forbid it either. If you want a Notary who specializes in loan signing, Notaryz will tell you how those Notaries performed on the standardized test they have. Notaryz will also connect you with 3rd rate Attorneys who can’t get a real job who will give you discounted help drafting Powers of Attorney, permission to travel or other documents without you having to leave your desk. Notaryz is doing some brisk business, however is dealing with some tough competition from “PersynallyAppear” — an app that finds you a Notary who will personally appear before you without any digital signatures or web cams.

Roomyz
Are you upset with your roommate and want to pull a prank on them? Well, this new app called Roomyz is for you. They will play a joke on your roommate, send flowers from a nonexistent admirer, or throw water on them while they are leaving the house. Just download a photo of your roommate, use the dropdown menu to select the prank of your choice, or use the text box to indicate a customized prank, and let Roomyz do the rest. You can select from pranksters with reviews and pay them using our “pay once completed” app. Roomyz will take 15% of the proceeds, the rest if for the agent.

PayMyNotary
This app might be a little more popular with Notaries. If Notary can submit proof that a job was assigned to them and the journal entries to prove that the job was done (or somewhat done) then PayMyNotary will go after the signing company who hired you. They will fax, text, call, send threatening demand letters, contact Title, and even go to the Better Business Bureau. PayMyNotary will even contact collection agencies using the new app “Kullect” to get companies to pay.

Kullect
Kullect will let a Notary choose from hundreds of collection agencies to find the best price and best terms to get signing companies to pay them. Just download the information about the Notary jobs done for a particular company, journal entries, and then Kullect will do the rest (unless the server is down in which case you’re on your own.)

NotaryStandUp
This app sends daily jokes to Notaries that they can tell their borrowers. Every day, you get fresh new jokes, so there is no danger of telling the same joke twice. You might get fired by a few signing companies using NotaryStandUp, but you will laugh all the way through the process and your customers will swear that you are a “Stand Up Guy.”

.

You might also like:

Apps that Notaries have never heard of that could change your life
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16311

New Apps for the iPhone7 that you’ve never dreamed of
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=10977

Share
>

July 20, 2016

Lifestyles of the Rich and Infamous Signing Companies

Notaries — you have to work for $40 per signing with notary jobs that include 40 pages of fax backs, 400 pages of printing which includes two sets of 200 pages. Did I mention that half of your jobs would get cancelled and the other half won’t pay you on time? Yes! That is correct. Because the signing companies are on Lifestyles of the Rich and Infamous Signing Companies!

Meet Terry. She is a signing company owner. Terry has a difficult decision to make today. She owes 200 Notaries for work that they did last month. But, she pays the previous month based on income during the current month. She is always behind. Unfortunately for Terry, business is far down this month and she will not be able to pay her Notaries. However, her monthly payment on her new BMV SUV which isn’t cheap is due in two days and she doesn’t want a ding on her credit (or her BMW.) So, she pays for her BMW.

Terry is clenching her fists because she has a second account created for her boob job which she wants to have done next month. If only she could make a wider margin on these Notary jobs. She is charging $200 and paying a whopping $40. Why is it so hard to make a decent margin these days?

So, Terry decides to take a dip in her $40,000 pool which she got a second Mortgage on the house to pay for. Why do pools need to be so expensive? Why is life so unfair? But, the Notaries are hounding her. Where is my money? How come it has been sixty days with no payment for the Notary work? Terry decides to make payments on an “on demand” basis. Whomever harrasses her the most gets paid the first. The rest will just get excuses.

Meanwhile this Notary named Ken demands his money up front. He has no trouble dealing with Terri. She hires him too because he is good and has decades of experience. One less thing to worry about when dipping in the pool.

In Terry’s opinion, she should have a private jet if she were living in a fair and just world. Terry is done dipping in the pool. Now it is time to go to a $200 per plate sushi plate where the theme of the night is called, “trust me.” You trust the chef to give you eight small plates, but you don’t know what is on them anymore than you know if you’ll ever get paid. Perhaps Terry should go to the $80 per plate sushi special to “save money” so she can pay a few of her Notaries. But, only if we were living in a perfect world.

You might also like:

The 90 days no payment list of signing companies
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=15887

Read our best signing company gossip
http://blog.123notary.com/?tag=gossip

Share
>

June 9, 2016

A comprehensive guide to Notary Pricing

It’s been a long time since I have written an article on pricing, so I feel it is high time! Most Notaries want to have a fixed fee and make tons of money. This is not always possible. The Notary market is a market with lots of little ups and down that a smart Notary needs to constantly adjust to. It’s smarter to have systems and formulas worked out ahead of time so you know how to react to these fluctuations.

There are fast days and slow days, monthly highs and lows, as well as changes in the market that happen over the years. There are also changes in who is competing with you in your area at a particular time. The key is to be flexible and learn how to charge accordingly. Here is how I would set my prices.

.

1. Time Involved
A smart Notary should charge based on how much time is spent. Notary jobs during rush hour involve more time. Jobs that involve printing more than the average amount of pages should be billed accordingly. Smart Notaries ask who the Lender or Bank is. This is because the name of the Lender can determine with some accuracy the size of the package. Signing companies lie about package sizes which is why smart Notaries ask. Additionally, there are many loan types and some require more time. Refinances are faster, while Construction Loans are longer but have more professional and businesslike signers. Reverse Mortgages, VA, and FHA take more time. Piggy Backs are double signings and have double the pages and double the Notary work. Time for doing a signing is based on these components:

Negotiating Time — Some companies are easy and pleasant to deal with. If it is fast getting assignments faxed or emailed to you and easy to confirm with the borrower, take notes of that time. It can differ from company to company.

Printing Time — Notaries should charge by the page for e-documents. Printing takes time, and often involves waiting for documents to be ready which can be hours if you work with irresponsible companies.

Driving Time –Factor in how much time it takes to get from point A to B. Keep notes so you’ll know how to charge for jobs to particular cities in the future.

Signing time — Some Lenders have loans that get signed quickly. Some Lenders answer the phone and get situations handled quickly while others don’t.

Loan Type Influences Time Spent — VA & FHA signings are just plain longer. Reverse Mortgages are for the elderly who are less businesslike and might need a lot more time to sign. Power of Attorney signings are the most likely not to fund, so take that into consideration. Piggy Back loans are double the signatures and double the notarizations. But, once everyone has sat down and you have your journal out, it goes quickly.

Fax Back Time — Fax Backs are a pain in the rear, but they serve a purpose. Signing companies can hire newbies and get away with it, because the signing company can check your work before it gets sent back to Title. They no longer need experienced Notaries. However, fax backs take time, so if your time is worth something, charge for each page faxed back.

Cancellation Rate Time Waste — Factor cancellation rate and billing time into the price.

Billing Time — Some companies pay on the first request while others require hounding.

.

2. Expenses Itemized

Printing Documents — is not only time consuming but costs money. You are using up paper, toner, cartridges, ink, and using up your time to restock what you used up. Charge accordingly.

Car Expenses — Driving a car is not free. Tires wear down, brakes wear out, plus you need to change the oil, filters, shocks, transmission, and more. So, in addition to time, try to work a mileage fee into your pricing in addition to charging for time.

.

3. Track Record & Risk of Not Getting Paid

Late Documents — If the signing company or title company was late getting your edocuments in the past, make a note of that. Keep detailed records of each company. Record how fast they paid you on each job. Recalculate their average days to payment every month just to keep records updated. Also, keep records for how late they are sending edocuments or how incompetent they are about keeping their borrowers informed. If you are dealing with a flake, charge more.

Unknown PartiesIf you accept a job from an unknown lender, or one with a bad reputation online, you might charge more, or make them pay up front. You should always charge extra when there is any type of risk involved. . These signings assume risk. Some of the risk is spending an unpredictable amount of time or not getting paid at all.

.

4. Payment Terms
If a Lender will only pay you if the loan funds, you need to charge more. Some Lenders will not pay your printing fee if the job gets cancelled, so make sure you know what the terms of the agreement are. Some will pay part of a travel fee if the job gets cancelled mid-way. However, the signing company booked your time, and you can’t give your leftover time to some other company at the last minute just because they needed to cancel. You have to commit your time to them, but do you make companies commit to paying you?

I personally feel that Notaries should set their own terms. You are not a bank, and it is not your job to gamble on whether or not a loan funds. You should be paid before, or within 72 hours of a signing in my opinion. But, you can make your own terms. Beginners have to accept the terms dictated to them, but old pros can make their own terms and get away with it. However, if you do accept terms that limit your ability to guarantee payment, charge a lot more.

Recommended Reading:
Issues to consider when creating a signing agent services contract
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=2593

.

5. Travel Fees for Non Loan Signing Work
Most Notaries charge $25 to $50 travel fee, and more if it is for jails or hospitals. You also charge by the signature on top of the travel fee. Charge based on how valuable your time is worth. If you are desperate for work, charge less. If your time is limited, charge more. If you have lots of other things to do, you have less supply of time so you can charge more — this is a strategy to consider — so stay busy my friends.

.

6. Jails & Hospital Notary Jobs
Charge more for jails and hospitals because these are the jobs where there is a lot more that can go wrong. You also will not be dealing with the cream of the crop. You can get stood up at a jail. Inmates do not have ID and your credible witness or ID carrier might not show up. ID’s might be expired. Hospital patients are often drugged making it impossible to notarize them. Half of them can’t even hold a pen, so how can they possibly sign? Consider this when deciding upon your jail & hospital travel fees which should be $60 to $150 depending on how greedy you are! Some Notaries are afraid to go to jails, but it is safe, and that is where you can make money fast. Just make sure you have them read their ID to you over the phone including expiration date or you will be very sorry. Also, get your travel fee in cash at the door BEFORE you see the signer. They might not be available or might not want to sign! Be prepared!

.

7. General Pricing Models
Keep in mind that a few years ago, Notaries could get paid a lot more. With Snapdocs and lower demand, companies can pay a lot less and get away with it.

Situations where you charge more or less
(1) Charge less during the first 17 days of the month. It is slower, and you have more time.
(2) Charge more during the end of the month. Additionally, you can charge more if you schedule a job several days in advance because you might miss out on a better offer. Additionally, jobs scheduled in advance in my day had a 25% cancellation rate which will wreak havoc on your schedule.
(3) Charge less if you are having a slow day and someone needs a last minute signing. If you are doing nothing, why not sell that time.
(4) eSignings have less physical pages, but often take longer because the signer and their spouse need to take turns looking at the computer screen not to mention the chance of delays due to technical issues.
(5) Charge extra if there are three or more signers on a loan.
(6) Charge more if the company cancels a lot
(7) Charge less if a company has a good track record and is easy and fast to deal with — or pleasant!
(8.) Charge more if there are lots of signatures to notarize.

Pricing Recommendations For Beginners. 0-500 signings

Basic Signing $60-$80
E-Documents: $10-$25 extra per double set or 7 cents per page
Pickups: $25 extra
Dropoffs: $20 extra — there is less waiting time during dropoffs
Reverse Mortgages: $100
Piggy Backs: $100
Regular Notary Work Travel Fee: $30 if within 30 minutes
Jail & Hospitals: $50

Pricing Recommendations for Intermediates. 500-3000 signings
Basic Signing: $80-$120; E-Documents: $20-$40 or 10 cents per page; Pickups: $30 extra; Dropoffs: $25 extra; Reverse Mortgages: $125; Piggy Backs: $125; Regular Travel Fee: $40 if within 30 miles; Jails & Hospitals: $70

When to charge in advance
You are not a bank and you should not offer endless credit to any signing company. Some of them will string you along and not pay you or play games with payments making it unclear which job they are paying for. Decide in advance how much credit to give each company and keep records. If you have a six month track record with a company and they pay you on time, you might offer them credit for six jobs. For all others, do one or two jobs, but don’t do any more until you get paid. It is not a bad idea to charge up front with Paypal, but few companies will pay a beginner up front. Ken, our seasoned Notary always gets paid up front, but he is a pro.

(1) New Companies — do one job, but don’t do a second until you get paid for the first unless they have a stellar record for payment on the forums.
(2) Some Track Record — do two jobs, but don’t do a third until you get paid for the first.
(3) Good Track Record — Watch out: good companies can turn bad if they experience financial difficulties or labor shortages. Do not offer credit for more than six jobs no matter what. A good track record should be over at least six months.

Don’t complain
There are many Notaries who have gone out of business because there is too much competition for too few jobs. If you are getting paid, getting experience, and staying afloat, you are ahead of the game. Many Notaries have this idea that they should get $125 per signing ever time. Unfortunately, it no longer works like this. So, take what you can get and just do your best! If you get more experience, you will be worth more in the long run. Additionally, the market could have an upswing at any time, so keep a positive thought.

.

You might also like:

Do you have to be a CSS to get work these days?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=8914

A great attitude gets most of the jobs
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=6493

Notary Marketing 102’s guide to negotiating Notary fees
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19784

Notary Public 102’s guide to Notary pricing
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19781

Share
>

January 12, 2016

Notary: The Art of the Decline — To new Jobs

Notary: the Art of the Decline – To new Notary Jobs
In a prior rant, I rambled on about declining to perform illegal activities; they definitely deserve and should always receive an unqualified NO. Here I will focus my oft grammatically incorrect scribbles at the decline. Nobody can accept every assignment offered, nor should they attempt to.

Why decline? The reasons are legion. For whatever reason, you do not want to accept the task that is being presented by the caller. Your key objective here should be to leave a pleasant and competent impression. Perhaps that 40$ lowballer will remember the great impression you gave and call you for a more realistic assignment at a later date. Your objective should not be to “get rid of the caller as soon as possible”. Each call is an opportunity to market your abilities.

It takes a lot less time to give some procedural advice over the phone than to do the job. Take a few minutes with the caller and showcase your knowledge. That works better with individuals than signing services. Perhaps your decline can morph into a postponement to a later date. As a minimum you should steer the caller to finding someone available. It’s not apparent to you, my reader; but that exact situation just happened to me. The caller needed a Will notarized, and unfortunately it needed to be done very soon. I do not qualify as the signature of the testator, the person who the will is for; must be notarized. In NY State, by a person who is both a Notary & Attorney. Having had similar calls in the past, I was able to direct the caller to a solution.

Sometimes the issues are much more complex. There are many ways to process the various documents that cross my path. Giving procedural, not legal advice is, to me; a proper form of public service. As notaries we understand our state laws and procedures. Sharing, to a caller some information on “what options you have that I am familiar with” does no harm. Of course some “trade secrets” are reserved for me to utilize. Giving “some” help is better than none.

Perhaps you have virtually no time at all to spend with the caller. It takes but a moment to tell them about http://123notary.com and perhaps Notary Rotary and Notary Café. Take a moment more to suggest the caller search using the zip code where the notary will be going. Often the caller thinks / assumes you are a walk in facility; and that is what they are seeking. I tell those callers that notaries are “sometimes” found at banks, pharmacies and law offices. No matter how little time you can allocate to the caller; you are always able to give some useful information. That will “mark” you as being helpful and caring; possibly the one to call for the next need.

No, I did not read “The Art of the Deal” by you know who; perhaps I should. But, I don’t think my notary function requires much deal making. Nor does it require declining many job requests. Some, yes; but not many. Thus “The Art of the Decline” will not be published by me. It all boils down to just being helpful. Make it clear you cannot accept the job, specifically say it’s not a money issue; you have “other” reasons for not being available. You really don’t need to give an exact reason; I simply say that I am “not available”.

Pay as much attention to your projected image with declines as you do with accepts. Think of it as contact with a potential future client. Perhaps a referral to a known to be competent “rival” is in order – and such arrangements often become bidirectional, a mutual advantage.

.

You might also like:

Decline profitable junk work
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=15495

The Right to Decline Notarization
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=14664

Share
>

January 4, 2016

I just got two jobs & they said they found me on 123notary, what now?

Be all that you can be!
Congratulations and thanks for enlisting! I am so happy when newcomers get lots of work from our directory. We work night and day to make our notary directory great! But, what now? The answer is that listings need to be all that they can be. It’s just like the army without the bullets. But, we have basic training.

Inspect your listing. There are several things you need to do before you clean your gun or your stamp.

1. Ask for help with your notes section.
We can’t write it for you, but if you write something, we can critique it. A good notes section with specifics and some unique information about you will really draw people in.

2. Pass our certification test.
People who pass our test not only get more work, but get slightly more compensation per signing and have more opportunities to move up the list on 123notary.com. You will need to study, but the knowledge you gain you keep for the rest of your life!

3. Get a few reviews
We value reviews so much that we call hundreds of people per month to remind them of how important it is to get reviews from strangers. On any site that has reviews such as Yelp, Travelocity, etc., the people with the most reviews get the most work, so start asking for reviews and ask us for help if you encounter any trouble.

4. Move up in the ranks
After you have passed our signingagent test and have two reviews, it is time to upgrade and join the big leagues or as we call it, “Special Forces.” At least try to get a promotion so you can pull rank on someone.

5. Stay out of trouble
No notary lasts forever. But, we have had many last for more than a decade on our site. Ken got promoted to General as he writes great blog articles and is a source of knowledge and inspiration. However, a few others had a dishonorable discharge. You still need to login to your listing every 120 days, otherwise you could get in a little trouble with us. Maintain your listing regularly, shine your boots (or shoes) and see if you take your seal apart and put it back together in less than 85 seconds.

6. PTSD
One Notary got PTSD from having borrowers yell at him too much about the APR. It is better to call the borrower up and go over the major figures before going into combat. And as always — ask for backup if you need any!

.

You might also like:

Getting the best notary jobs
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=9273

The art of the decline to new jobs
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=15783

Share
>

November 5, 2015

Have you ever been tempted not to go into a borrower’s house?

We are all under pressure to make a living and please our clients. But, sometimes you have to use common sense as well. Notaries are called to do signings regularly. You don’t know the condition of the house or neighborhood until you get there.

If George Carlin were a Notary, he would say that going to notary jobs in decrepid homes makes you feel good twice. When you accept the notary job you say, “I’m making money.” When you open the front door and run for your life you get to feel good a second time and say, “I’m saving my life!”

By the way, how’d you like to be a leftover? If they were taking people out to be shot I wouldn’t mind. I might even volunteer! Sorry, my childhood memories of Carlin’s tape stuck in my brain I guess.

Anyway, we have a story about a notary who knew Carmen. This took place years ago. She went into a house that was so filthy, she contracted a serious bacterial infection and had to be quarantined in the hospital. It was like having Ebola. It was called Legionaire’s disease and it was life threatening.

Other times, the house has rats, or other unclean animals running around. Sometimes it is the humans who give you the creeps. Carmen did a job years ago for some guy with long toe nails. Every time he walked around you would hear the click click click of his toenails.

Don’t feel bad by refusing to go into a house. You might be saving your life, sanity, or well-being. Just Google your nearest Starbucks and request that the signing is done there.

.

You might also like:

The lady and the handwritten will (her house was a complete mess)
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=3609

Borrowers and their filthy homes
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=2214

Share
>

August 10, 2015

Many notaries who previously wouldn’t leave the house for <$125 are working for peanuts.

Even some of our most seasoned notaries have gotten so desperate that they are forced to work for less than they feel they deserve in terms of Notary wages or fees. We’ve had notaries who had strict policies of working for no less than $125 or $100 forced to do Notary jobs for $60. Some take this emotionally, while others realize that we all have to eat, and that a notary’s gotta do what a notary’s gotta do. On a brighter note, the price of gas went down by more than a dollar, so your expenses are a lot less now!

Notaries make the mistake of trying to figure out what they “should” get paid or what is “fair.” In the world of business there is no should and there is no fair. In foreign countries people doing the exact same job you are doing might only make $5 or $10 per day, so is that fair? As people living in America, you have it better than any other country, even Canada. Of course a well off person in a foreign country is likely to be better off than you, but someone doing the same Notary job you are is probably a lot worse off. The point I am trying to make is that fairness can only be viewed in perspective. But, even if you can figure out a very equilateral viewpoint of fairness, it won’t do you any good. The universe gives you what it gives you. It decides how much it is going to give you and you just have to work with what is given to you. Forget about fair, and just do the best you can.

Do you see people working at gas stations shaking their head saying, “It just doesn’t seem fair that we have to sell gas at $2.40 per gallon now. We’re doing the same work we were doing when it was $4.00 but getting paid close to half for the same work.” No, they just go about their business and do the best they can which is what you should be doing. Try and do as well as you can as a notary regardless of what the external conditions are. If things get too slow, you can try to supplement your income with other tasks or jobs. In the worst case scenario, if it is really slow, it might be time to get a full time job and moonlight at night doing notary work.

In my opinion, the market for notaries and Notary jobs will bounce back eventually. I’m not sure when. It really depends on a variety of standards. If it has been many years since people could refinance, they will get more and more anxious to do so, even if the percentage of equity they can borrow upon is low. If housing values go up, or interest rates go up, and then down, there could be more refinances. Or, if banks simply lower their standards for who can borrow money, we might see more loans going through. We live in a changing world, and markets go up and down.

Look on the bright side, maybe North Korea will get rich and start buying up property in your area. That will drive the price up, and then there will be more refinances. On the other hand you might have more competition from “Un Notary service” if Kim John Un becomes a notary! Picture him being your neighbor!

.

You might also like:

My interpretation of how the Notary industry went South
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16500

VA signings for $85 with 200 pages?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=15879

Share
>

April 30, 2015

JOBS: More jobs, less jobs, taking jobs away, taking bigger cut of money from jobs

Filed under: Ken Edelstein — Tags: , , — admin @ 10:47 am

Did you ever look up at the sky on a hot July night and wish for snow? That’s exactly the same approach some notaries use to “grow” their business. Wishing won’t cut it. It’s not as if you do not know what needs being done. It’s just that sloth sets in, sometimes followed by despair. This leads to the self fulfilling prophecy of anger, bad attitude (you can’t mask it – all can sense it) and poor job performance. You can have more jobs, you just have to work for them – the basic step of distributing a business card is cheap and effective. Have you placed a few dozen in the right hands of prospective, currently non-clients? Probably not. DO IT, the ROI is fantastic, get more calls!

Speaking of ROI (Return on Investment), sometimes “less jobs”; or, to be more accurate; the selective acceptance of Notary jobs is the best path. With the exception of some notaries, no reasonable business owner accepts every offer. Try walking into Burger King and offering a buck for a Whopper! Carefully consider the offer. Is it profitable? Will you have to expend a great deal of time and effort for “chump change”? Just say no. If you, really implemented paragraph one above, the calls are coming in. You will not have the time to accommodate El Cheepo, especially considering the additional requirements; and the difficulty of collection.

The vast majority reading these words are competitors – we do not cooperate much with other notaries in our area. Sure, there are some exceptions – but each and every one of you wish someone in your area retired. But chances are they will continue to lowball, and the folks at El Cheepo will tell you that they have many others eager to do the Notary job. They are taking away jobs that you do not want; don’t let it bother you. You are smarter than the lowball acceptor – you have clients who pay a fair wage for your perfection. I get many lowball offers from the bottom fishers, the calls tend to be brief after I mention that my non-negotiable fee is about double their offer. You can also receive many “Tier One” calls; those are the jobs where you are doing the “taking away”. They are not offered to those in the computer as being “White Glove fee” acceptors.

Finally, there is the issue of taking a bigger cut of money from Notary jobs. Bigger Cut? Well, that’s just another way of saying the “P” word. Profit. Some almost seem to whisper that word, after looking over their shoulder, lest someone notice. The bigger cut is what remains in your pocket after all, and I do mean all; expenses, costs, taxes, etc., are deducted from the “R” word – Revenue. Oh, you majored in accounting? Then you can just use Gross for Revenue and Net for Profit. I will stick to P and R. Obviously, you want more R, without R there can’t be P. Your true goal is to have a very large Profit, expenses drain money from Revenue.

So now you are thinking the Ps and Rs are obvious, and you are right. So I ask why some of you are accepting a 75$ edoc that requires: printing 300 pages, driving 150 miles, tolerating endless cell minutes of checkup, faxing everything; and allowing someone else to have the USE of your money for an extended period of time? “If I don’t accept it they might not call me again”. “You have to take the bad with the good”. “Some money is better than no money”. If those reasons were valid Burger King would have given you the Whopper for a dollar. The reasoning is flawed.

You can and should do better. Your notary commission is a valuable asset; and your time + your skill is even more valuable. One of the wiser posters on the forum has a signature that includes: If you don’t value your time and experience nobody else will. So true. Eliminating the self abuse of accepting every call will let you, as Spock put it: Live Long and Prosper.

You might also like:

The art of the decline to new notary jobs
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=15783

How to get the best notary jobs
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=9273

Share
>

April 13, 2015

Notary Jobs: None Bad, All Bad, Some Good

Notary Jobs: None Bad, All Bad, Some Good
As is often the case I use an unusual title to perk your interest in my current installment. This one focuses on what assignments you actually accept. Yes, it’s you who determines what you do. They make “offers” you have the final decision. Of course when they “walk in” to a place of public accommodation your local laws probably prohibit you from refusing service without a good reason. But, as mobile notaries; our assignments are generally offered over the phone or via email; we are free to accept or decline.

Actually reaching an agreement to None is bad for business; you will have no revenue. If you are a mobile notary that’s probably not the situation you are looking for. The reverse is also true. Accepting All offers, though sometimes tempting; will in the long run be bad for your “bottom line”. A lowballer will never forget your acceptance of a 55$ edoc fee. “Once they see how good a job I do they will be willing to pay more” – that’s a pipe dream.

So, most of us live in the land of Some. Prior installments have discussed the often humorous aspect of some tendered offers. Hopefully, or should it be hopelessly; few of us are willing to drive 150 miles, in the middle of the night, thru a snowstorm; for the princely sum of 75$. Offers of that type remind me of a phrase used when I worked at a brokerage firm with a pet bull. “The cows may come and the cows may go; but the bull is here to stay”.

We need to actively filter the call/email to determine, quickly, the essence of the offer. If you don’t know the what, when and where; merely knowing the dollar amount, is inadequate to make the accept or decline decision. Unless, of course, the offer is for a very low dismissible fee. You need to get the real specifics, nothing can be vague, and nothing can be assumed. I once accepted an offer “in New York” assuming they were referring to within the city. Nope, they wanted me several hundred miles north of the city, hours away. Was it a misunderstanding? Or bull?

Be it misunderstanding, or bull, or a “change” in the specifications; how do you respond. What would be your reaction to the following scenario? They offer your standard rate for an edoc that is not too far from you. They say it’s about 125 pages and there are no special requirements (because you asked). You receive the confirmation and await the docs. Finally the docs arrive and the top page stresses the need to print 3 sets of the 185 page package. One set is for borrower. The other two sets are to be fully executed, and both faxed back “for approval” and when approved a pair of FedEx labels will be sent for shipment. You are also required to remain with the borrower until your faxing is approved. Probably the SS did not know the additional tasks, and, let’s assume relayed accurately all they knew.

Are you stuck with a wet baby on your lap? Of course not, it’s “bounce back” time; or they must greatly increase the fee. I would require an immediate PayPal full payment; fool me once shame on you, fool me twice shame on me. It’s very hard to actually receive at a later date a fee that was raised from the initial offer. The “miscommunications” is not your fault, or problem.

Thus, even when you take care to select Some, bad things can happen. It is how you react, and what you now demand (yup demand – if they want you to stick with it); that determines if you will be exploited or paid fairly for the work involved. Don’t let “their” problem become yours.

.

You might also like:

Nobody wanted the Notary job
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16469

Protecting yourself with a contract
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=2593

Share
>

February 14, 2012

Immigration documents for gay lovers.

Immigration documents for gay lovers 

I’m glad I got to publish this one on Valentine’s day! I have done many types of notary jobs, but this one is one I’ll remember for a long time.  In my career, I notarized documents for gay couples in West Hollywood many times.   It is a little different, but I got used to it. By the way, West Hollywood is a place where close to half the population is gay, and the other half is either Russian, or in the film business in one way or the other.  When you work as a notary public in Los Angeles, you see all areas and will see many movie sets, domestic partners, gang members, jails inmates, busy businesmen, people who speak languages other than English, and regular suburban folks too.
 
An affidavit of support for a non-relative – this job was different
I was to go to the San Fernando Valley to Encino to notarize documents for a middle-aged American man who looked like he was in his 50’s.  He was very nice and very gentle and lived in a very comfy house with a big living room. And there was another man there too, in his early twenties, Asian, also very nice, very lean, and very gentle too.  The document to be notarized was an affidavit of support.  What I learned, was that the older man was having a relationship with the younger man who was from Hong Kong, and the older man wanted to support him.  They had a very loving way of looking at each other. Love was in the air… I hope it lasts!!!
 
Checking Identification
I checked everyone’s ID at this notary job.  Since I’m a nosey person, I wanted to see how old everyone was, and that information is on every Driver’s license. I wanted to be polite, so I didn’t comment on how old…. or not old…. certain people at the signing were…. or weren’t.   I had everyone sign where they were supposed to sign.
 
The Oath and the paperwork
 Next, I had to have them raise their right hands and solemnly swear under oath that the contents of the document were true and correct and that they promised to abide by the terms of the document.  The response was, “I do!”, and they gave each other more loving stares. This was so romantic, like a movie!  I filled out my journal entry, had them sign the journal,  filled out the notarial wording, signed, and affixed my seal.  Done!  That was easy.  I collected my fee and was on my way.
 
Affidavits of domestic partnership
I’m not sure if this document is still used or not.  However, about a decade ago, I used to notarize many affidavits of domestic partnership for gay couples  in West Hollywood. It was one of those standard documents that you have done a thousand times. I think they need this type of document for saving on taxes or getting other benefits.  I am not clued in on this, so if someone wants to fill in the blanks with a comment on this blog, that would inform everyone.

You might also like:

Notarizing your foreign language document
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=2768

Vampire notaries: 24 hour service
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=4094

Share
>