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February 13, 2019

How do you notarize a copy of a passport?

A few states might allow copy certification on the part of the Notary which means that the notary would officially vouch for the truthfulness and authenticity of the copy.

However, most states do not allow this. Copy certification by document custodian is an embellished Jurat. It requires the signer or document custodian to swear to the truthfulness of the copy of the document. It is generally best that the notary also inspect the document to make sure it is a true copy and perhaps write an informal note stating the same. This is how I was trained when I was a Notary Public.

Can a resident alien card be used for a notarization?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=8282

Notary Public 101 – basic notary acts
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19500

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October 26, 2013

How to Notarize a Copy of a Passport

Notarize a copy of a passport

There is always some confusion about the legality of copying and notarizing official documents. You cannot notarize a birth certificate, marriage or death certificate. There is no official certification procedure for getting a certified copy of a passport. California notaries can make a certified copy of a power of attorney, but that is the only type of document that you can get a certified copy of. So, what type of notary act can you do to notarize that copy of your passport?

There is a notary act called a copy certfication by document custodian. This is basically a Jurat with some unique wording. It makes the sign swear under oath to the accuracy and completeness of the copy. It is common for students to have copies of transcripts notarized using this procedure. I used the copy certification by document custodian form regularly when I was a notary since it was the only way to accommodate requests for copies.

Many notaries do not carry the form for the certification by document custodian Jurat procedure, so if you need this done, figure out ahead of time whether or not the Notary has the forms that are acceptable to whomever you are submitting your document to as they are the boss in a sense.

You might also like:

Notarize copies of passports (Forum)
http://www.123notary.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=1904

Can a resident alien card be used for a notarization?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=8282

A California Notary Acknowledgment goes to Taiwan
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=6981

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September 17, 2019

How a video game reminded me what a noble profession we have

Filed under: Other Guest Bloggers — admin @ 9:57 pm

So, you’re probably wondering why I’m even talking about a video game. After all, working as a notary is serious business and you wouldn’t be wrong in saying that it is a profession where errors are seriously frowned upon. Our experience in the profession varies, but the one thing that’s constant among all notaries is that there are professional standards that need to be met.

Some tasks are straightforward and simple, while others are more complex. Yet, no matter how simple the task may be, the smallest error can put others at risk. The game I’m referring to, called Papers, Please, offers is a similar — albeit virtual — experience.

First Off, What Exactly Is Papers, Please?

A recently released point and click game game, Papers, Please places the player in the shoes of a border inspector of a country called Arstotska. The player’s task is to screen each person who wants to enter the country and to try to adhere to standards set by the government. There are many other aspects of the game, but this is the aspect that I want to put a heavy emphasis on. In the game, making an error gets you a citation, and in the later stages an error means letting dangerous people through the border, which puts lives at risk. You essentially handle sensitive data, check it for accuracy and truthfulness, and decide whether you’d allow the person into the country or not.

It’s quite similar to how we check statements and decide if the facts hold up. In fact, most, if not all court proceedings rely heavily on notarized documents, especially during personal injury cases, according to the lawyers at tariolaw.com.

Why Should We Care About This Game?

Well, that’s where the error is. You assume that this is about the game. It’s not. What really struck me was how the tasks got more and more complicated as the game progressed. You have to assess various pieces of information and decide whether to stamp a traveller’s passport, allowing them access through the border.

This puts an air of risk in the game, even when all the player does is to look through papers and counter-check facts presented by a traveller. And the way that the travelers interact with the player in an attempt to appeal to the player’s kinder nature forces you to make hard decisions.

How Is It Related To The Profession?

It reminded me a lot of how we, as public notaries, are the front line of defense against any attempts to commit fraud. In the same way that the inspector in Papers, Please is the first line of defense against people who would do the country harm, we are the first line of defense against people who want to put falsehoods onto paper or when they try to twist the truth in their favor.

And it’s rather funny that I was unexpectedly reminded of this duty by a video game that I happened to stumble across whilst browsing my YouTube feed in my free time!

I mean, whether you’ve had 30 years of experience in the profession or you’re a rookie who’s learning the ropes, it can be draining to do the same thing over and over if you forget your purpose. I’ll say it again, ours is a profession that can’t have any mistakes, whether they’re big mistakes or common mistakes — we are all about accuracy and precision. And sometimes it can be quite draining, but always remember that the seal that we stamp has power and authority. People are depending on us to verify facts and to educate them on what they’re getting into by signing a document.

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March 6, 2019

How do you get something notarized if you don’t have ID?

Filed under: Technical & Legal — Tags: , , — admin @ 9:28 am

How to get something notarized if you don’t have ID?

Credible Witnesses
The answer is that it’s not so simple. Most states have rigid rules for who can be notarized and what type of identification is necessary. However, many states allow you to be notarized if two individuals called “credible witnesses” swear to your identity. They can generally be anyone who knows you. But, how can you know if you are in a state that allows credible witnesses? Ask a local notary and find out. The sad thing is that many of them do not know how to use credible witnesses to identify a signer. So, do your homework and find a Notary who is in the know, so to speak.

The Process of Obtaining an ID
In the long run all people should have an ID, and there is a typical way to get this. You need to get your birth certificate from the city you were born in — and hopefully you know where that is. From there, you can get a state ID card and then you can get a passport.

How it Used to Be
Many years ago, you could get a Jurat done (which is a notary act.) Jurats require a sworn Oath but did not used to require identification on the part of the signer. I believe that they do now in all states, but I could be wrong.

Typical ID’s that are acceptable for a notary would be:
State issued ID cards
Drivers licenses
Passports
Military ID cards
Green cards did not used to be acceptable in California but might be now and you can ask a local notary.
Credit cards with photos are NOT acceptable.
Social Security cards are also not acceptable.

As a general rule a government issued photo ID with a signature, serial number, physical description and expiration date would be acceptable.

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You might also like:

Notary Public 101 – A Guide to Identification
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19507

Identification for Prison Notarizations
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22139

Expired Identification
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=8294

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February 2, 2019

Banks need Notaries to be on staff

If you are a Notary Public and want to get work, banks seem to need to have Notaries on staff. You need to have other skills to, but the fact you are a Notary really makes you a whole lot more attractive since they need that service often.

Bank Notaries
Banks typically offer Notary services. They often offer this service free to their clients or at least for a reasonable cost. They need you to have mastered whatever skills are pertinent for the position you are applying for. But having a current Notary commission gives you that extra edge and can help you get hired at a bank a lot more easily.

Issues for Bank Notaries
Some Notaries get their commission on their own. but, other Notaries have their notary commission paid for by their boss which complicates matters a bit. Some Notaries have an exclusivity agreement where they can only Notarize for their boss. The nature of this agreement might be based on whatever your particular state laws allow. Therefor I cannot make any generalized statements about this type of agreement. An exclusivity agreement says that the Notary can only notarize for clients of the boss. Or it might say the Notary can only notarize for clients during hours of business. However, the journal and seal are still the exclusive property of the Notary Public regardless of who paid for their commission (assuming your state requires journals and not all states do). If the boss wants to see their journal, they can look up a particular entry in the presence of the Notary, but may not walk off with the Notary journal.

Notary Identification
A Notary at a bank can do a notarization for someone who walks in. The signer or customer would need to have a current or valid identification card or passport that is acceptable in your state. Generally drivers licenses, state ID cards, military ID, and passports would be accepted in any state and other types of ID might be also depending on what it is and what state you are located in.

Can a Bank Notary Notarize for a non-customer?
They may or may not, and that is on a bank by bank basis.

What can a Bank Notary Charge?
Once again, some banks offer free notarizations while others charge for their services. Maximum fees are based on state laws and you can find out by googling your state notary division’s website.

You might also like:

Wells Fargo Power of Attorney Form
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22125

The me too movement affects Notaries at a bank
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=21149

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December 29, 2018

Notaries can get jobs at banks more easily

Filed under: Marketing Articles — Tags: , , — admin @ 7:28 am

If you are a Notary Public and want to get work, certain types of businesses seem to need to have Notaries on staff. You need to have other skills to, but the fact you are a Notary really makes you a whole lot more attractive since they need that service often.

Bank Notary Public
Banks typically offer Notary service. They often offer it free to their clients or at least for a reasonable cost. They need you to understand whatever skills are pertinent for the position you are applying for. But having a current Notary commission gives you that extra edge and can help you get hired a lot more easily.

Bank Notary Issues
Some Notaries get their commission on their own. but, other Notaries have their notary commission paid for by their boss which complicates matters. Some Notaries have an exclusivity agreement where they can only Notarize for their boss. The nature of this agreement might be based on whatever your particular state laws allow, so I cannot make any generalized statements about this type of agreement. An exclusivity agreement says that the Notary can only notarize for clients of the boss. Or it might say the Notary can only notarize for clients during business hours. However, the journal and seal are still the exclusive property of the Notary Public regardless of who paid for their commission. If the boss wants to see their journal, they can look up a particular entry in the presence of the Notary, but may not walk off with the Notary journal.

Notary Identification
A Notary at a bank can do a notarization for someone who walks in. The signer or customer would need to have a current or valid identification card or passport that is acceptable in your state. Generally drivers licenses, state ID cards, and passports would be accepted in any state and other types of ID might be also depending on what it is and what state you are located in.

Can a Bank Notary Notarize for a non-customer?
That is entirely up to the individual bank.

What can a Bank Notary Charge?
Once again, some banks offer free notarization services while others charge for their services. Maximum fees are based on state laws and you can find out by googling your state notary division’s website.

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You might also like:

Bank of America Power of Attorney Form
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=21327

Does Real Estate experience help as a Notary?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=4563

The Power of Attorney was rejected by a bank
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=6368

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December 24, 2018

Acknowledgment FAQ

Filed under: Notary Acts & Certificates — admin @ 9:39 am

What is an Acknowledgment? Or, should I say, what is a Notary Acknowledgment or Notarized Acknowledgment? Why is it missing the “e” after “g”? Is that a typo, and should it be spelled Acknowledgement? No, it is not a typo.

Notaries commissioned in the various fifty states have a variety of Notary acts that they may perform. Some are common ones that are practices in virtually every state, although they sometimes have name variations and sometimes the rules for these acts can change slightly from state to state as well.

Common Notary acts that are almost completely universal include:

Acknowledgments — an act where the signer acknowledges having sign a document and acknowledges in the physical presence of the notary public, but does not have to sign in front of the Notary except in a handful of states (it’s complicated).

Jurats — an act where the signer or “affiant” must sign the document in the physical presence of the Notary Public as well as swear or affirm under the penalty of perjury to the truthfulness of the content of the document.

Oaths — a purely verbal act where the affiant must swear under Oath under God to the truthfulness of an oral or written statement.

Affirmations — a purely verbal act where the affiant must affirm under Oath on their honor to the truthfulness of an oral or written statement. Please note that Oaths and Affirmations are not the same act, but can be used interchangeably and carry the same legal weight and significance.

How does a signer Acknowledge their signature?
Does the signer say, “I hereby proclaim that I, the party of the first part, the signing party withstanding , have signed the foregoing instrument herein, and thereto, and therefor acknowledge the same in my capacity as an individual so-on and so forth.” The truth of the matter is that you can simply place the signed document in front of the Notary Public (in most states, exceptions apply) and ask him if he/she can notarized it with an Acknowledgment, or you can just say, “I signed this, please notarize it.”

What are the requirements for Acknowledgment wording or Acknowledgment verbiage?
All states require some sort of Acknowledgment verbiage. The requirements differ from state to state. Many states require certain components or facts to be covered in the wording while others might require exact state specific wording. It is best to ask an Attorney what wording is necessary in your case. Many Notaries do not carry pads of Acknowledgments with them (although they should) and it is up to you to make sure that notarial wording is either embedded in the document or attached on a loose certificate that is stapled to the document.

Who can perform a Notary Acknowledgment?
As a general rule, a Judge, Notary, Justice of the Peace, and perhaps a few other legal professions may execute Acknowledgments. When in doubt, ask an Attorney for a state specific answer.

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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
When I studied to be a Notary Public, my teacher said you Acknowledge a signature, Execute a Jurat and Administer an Oath. This is not true. The Notary is not the one who acknowledges signatures. The SIGNER acknowledges the signature and then the Notary CERTIFIES that the signer acknowledged the signature by virtue of filling out an Acknowledgment Certificate. Here are some basics on Acknowledgments.

1. The signer acknowledges having signed the particular document.

2. The signer must physically personally appear before the Notary for such an act.

3. The signer does NOT have to sign before the Notary according to most if not all states such as AK, IA, SC, SD, VT, and WV. Lenders might require the borrower to sign in the presence of the Notary, but that is a particular Lender’s standard and not necessarily a state standard or even a best practice.

4. The Notary must positively identify the signer using identification documents acceptable to their state which normally include Drivers Licenses, State issued identification photo ID’s, Passports, and Military ID’s. Other ID might be accepted on a state by state basis. You can look that up in your handbook. Also, see our section on identification.

5. The Notary should ideally keep a journal entry of all Notarial acts even if their state does not require this.

6. There should be Acknowledgment wording appropriate or acceptable to your state inscribed within the document, or you can attach a loose acknowledgment form with a staple.

7. After you fill out the certificate form, you sign and stamp the page (some states allow you to write in your seal information without a stamp.) Make sure your stamp is clear and not smudgy otherwise the county recorder has the right to reject the Notarization.

8. Note — some states require the Notary to ask the signer to attest to the fact that they signed the document in their own free will. Please be aware if your state has any unusual requirements or special wording on forms.

9. A California Notary faces many restrictions as to what type of out of state forms they can use. Please check the California Notary Handbook to see what you can accept and what you can’t otherwise you could get in trouble particularly if it is a recorded document.

10. There is an optional and additional information section in Acknowledgments which helps identify the document that the certificate corresponds to. This includes the document name, document date, number of pages, and other pertinent information.

Resources

Basic Notary Acts — Acknowledgments
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19500

Acknowledgment vs. Acknowledgement
http://grammarist.com/spelling/acknowledgment-acknowledgement/

Legal definition of Acknowledgment (does not necessarily apply to notary profession)
https://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/acknowledgment

Can you send a loose Acknowledgment?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16168

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December 12, 2018

Notarized Affidavit

What is a Notarized Affidavit?
An Affidavit is simply a document that requires being notarized in a way that requires an Oath. The signer or affiant (who is the same person(s)) signs and swears to the truthfulness of the document in the presence of the Notary Public for this type of document as a general practice. The type of Notary act used customarily would be a Jurat.

How do you get a Notarized Affidavit Notarized?
The affiant needs to personally appear before a Notary Public commissioned in the state where the notarization is taking place. The affiant normally needs to be identified with some identification card, or passport that is acceptable in the state where the procedure is taking place. The affiant signs the instrument and swears to the validity of the content of the document in the presence of the notary. The affiant might have to sign the Notary’s journal depending on what state you are in. Normally Notaries charge a state-specific fee for their service.

Who is the document custodian for a Notarized Affidavit?
Please consult your Attorney. That depends and is on a case by case basis.

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TECHNICAL TERMS:

Signer — one who signs a document.

Affiant — someone who signs a sworn statement or swears or affirms to the truthfulness of an oral statement.

Notary Public – someone commissioned by their state to notarize documents and administer Oaths and perhaps do other tasks depending on what state they are commissioned in.

Identification – normally a driver license, state ID, military ID, or passport, but some states allow for other types of identification as well. Consult your state’s notary handbook online.

Jurat – a notary act traditionally used with affidavits that involves signing a written statement and swearing or affirming under Oath.

Document Custodian – the person or entity who holds on to a document and stores it or saves it in their files.

Instrument – a notarial technical term which means document

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You might also like:

See our string about Affidavits
http://blog.123notary.com/?tag=affidavit

Read about Jurats in Notary Public 101
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19500

Compilation of posts about Notary fraud
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=21527

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KEYWORDS:

How do I get a notarized affidavit?
How do you notarize an affidavit?
Who can notarize an affidavit?
How much is a notarized affidavit
What does a notarized affidavit cost?
Notarized affidavit of citizenship
Notarized affidavit of consent
Notarized affidavit of support
Notarized affidavit of domicile

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September 29, 2018

Now is the Right Time to become a Notary / Signing Agent

Filed under: Ken Edelstein — admin @ 11:19 am

Now is the Right Time to become a Notary / Signing Agent

Sounds strange? You think the business is dying? Sure, at the moment things are slow. But, I forecast a booming future for the industry. There are many positive signs:

Baby Boomers Getting Out

The “old guard” of “seasoned” experts, born in the 40s are collecting Social Security or looking at the daisies from the root end. It’s time for the next generation. No doubt about it. They (and I) are “slowing down” and less willing to take on the pressure and rush aspects required to earn top fees. They disappear slowly, as their cells phones are unanswered; clients look for new solutions.

Cost of Entry is getting Lower

The tool set required by the modern Notary / Signing Agent is lower than in the past. Cell costs are very low with unlimited plans common. Sure, very fancy phones are super costly; but they are not necessary. As long as it can make and receive voice, text and email – it’s good enough. The cost of printers has fallen dramatically, HP Laserjet is still the benchmark, mine is a totally reconditioned 4350n (network “Ethernet” or WiFi) with duplexer for under $500. A separate FAX machine is unnecessary as Efax service for about ten bucks a month allows a PDF to be “sent as FAX” from any internet connected PC.

The Economy is on the Rise

I’m not going into a political discussion. But it’s hard to argue that personal wealth is not on the rise. This leads to more home ownership and other notary service needs. The “well rounded” notary; comfortable with Edocs and a variety of personal documents that require notarization will flourish. Case in point: I have noticed a great uptick in persons obtaining passports for their children for vacation purposes. Often only one parent can submit; with the notarized signature on the application of the other parent. I am getting LOTS of these lately.

Training is Readily Available

In addition to your state “rule book” many offer advanced classes and training. This was not so easy to obtain a few decades ago. Related to training is obtaining certifications as to your skill level. These “advanced degrees” draw clients to you like a magnet. A few hours a day, two or three for a couple of weeks can really advance your skill level. The big notary sites have blogs which are rich in real how to do information. Also read the “what not to do” equally important.

It’s not “Instant” Riches

Understand that your business, like any other business will grow slowly, At first it’s just some extra pocket money for a night out. Don’t quit your day job until you have a “critical mass” of repeat clients. Don’t forget to distribute your business card widely, perhaps with a cover letter about you and your services. Carry a well stocked “kit” of supplies, forms, embossers and stamps to meet any request. Your Notary Commission can and will yield the results you want; if you are willing to put the appropriate amount of effort into becoming the most skilled in your area.

You might also like:

How to become a successful mobile notary from scratch
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=13340

How does pricing work for top placements on 123notary?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19355

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September 4, 2018

Find a Notary who can notarize an inmate at Men’s Central, Twin Towers, Century Regional. Pitches Detention Center

Do you need a Notary who can do prison notarizations? 123notary has many Notaries who offer mobile service to jails, prisons, correctional facilities, penitentiaries, and detention centers. Here are some issues involved:

1. Someone needs to meet the Notary at the jail. That person can be an Attorney, family member, friend, or paid assistant.

2. The inmate must have identification that is satisfactory to the state where the notarization takes place. It is ideal if the person meeting the Notary has a current ID for the inmate such as a valid and current driver license, ID card, passport, etc. However, if the inmate has a wristband or jail ID card that is acceptable to the state where the notarization is taking place.

3. A California Notary may accept an inmate identification card issues by the state Department of Correction and Rehabilitation.

4. Florida allows Notaries to accept inmate ID cards issued by the U.S. Department of Justice or Bureau of Federal Prisons.

5. Credible witnesses are allowed in most states. A credible witness is a person who can vouch for the identity of a signer who does not have ID. Typically the credible witness must swear under Oath as to the identity of the signer (exact procedure depends on state laws) and must be identified by the notary and sign the journal in the additional information section. Some states allow one credible witness who knows both the Notary and inmate while others allow two who both know the signer, but don’t necessarily know the Notary. Other states allow one or two, while some states do not allow identification via credible identifying witnesses.

6. In states that require a journal, you must find a way to get the journal to the other side of the glass. Normally a warden will be happy to assist you with this task, however wardens might keep you waiting for five or ten minutes in my experience.

7. Lock downs happen in jails. If a lock down happens, you might be asked to leave, or might be taken virtually hostage until the lock down is over.

8. The Notary must have full vision of the signer and the signer must appear before the Notary. It is okay if the signer is on the other side of a glass provided that direct communication is possible. In my opinion, the signers should be within about five feet of the Notary otherwise you cannot fulfill the “personal appearance” requirement of most Notary acts.

9. Power of Attorney documents are common documents to be notarize in a correctional facility. That document normally requires an Acknowledgment which is a common Notary act which just requires the signer to sign the document, and then sign a Notary journal (most states but not all states). The Notary would need to check whatever ID the inmate has available and enter that information into the journal.

10. You can find a Notary on 123notary.com to do your jail signing. It is best to bring cash, and pay the travel fee up front. Then pay waiting time and whatever fee there is per signature after the work is done. Each Notary has their own fee and method of collecting their fee. Paying in two stages makes it easier for the Notary as some people try to get out of paying the Notary at all if there is any type of problem getting the inmate to come to the visiting room or sign, or be identified.

You might also like:

See our Jail Notary string
http://blog.123notary.com/?tag=jail-notary

A guide to notarizing for prison inmates
https://www.nationalnotary.org/notary-bulletin/blog/2016/07/guide-notarizing-for-prison-inmates

Jail notarizations forum string
http://www.notaryrotary.com/archive/forum/2009/March/Jail_Notarizations.html

Jail signing information
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/notary-jail-signing-information-susana-landa

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An inmate needs to be notarized
An inmate needs a notary
An inmate needs a notarized document
An inmate needs a notarized power of attorney
An incarcerated person needs to be notarized
An incarcerated person needs a notary
An incarcerated person needs a power of attorney notarized
Find a Notary who can notarize an inmate
Find a Notary who can travel to a jail.
Find a Notary who can notarize at a jail.
Find a Notary who can travel to a prison.
Find a Notary who can notarize at a prison.
Find a Notary who can notarize at a detention center.
Find a Notary who can travel to a detention center.
Find a Notary who can travel to a penitentiary
Find a Notary who can notarize at a penitentiary
Find a Notary who can travel to a correctional facility
Find a Notary who can notarize at a correctional facility

Find a Notary who can travel to a Los Angeles County prison facility
Find a Notary who can notarize at a Los Angeles County prison facility
Find a notary who can travel to Twin Towers Los Angeles
Find a Notary who can travel to Men’s Central Los Angeles
Find a Notary who can travel to Century Regional Los Angeles
Find a Notary who can travel to Pitches Detention Center, Valencia, CA
Find a Notary who can travel to North County Correctional Facility
Prison power of attorney notary
Prison power of attorney notarized
Detention center power of attorney notary
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Detention Center Notary
Detention Center Notarization
Correctional Facility Notary
Correctional Facility Notarization
Penitentiary notary
Penitentiary notarization

How can I obtain a valid government issued ID from prison?
Is a state prison ID government issued?
Notary goes to prison
Can a notary go to jail?
Do jails provide a notary?
Can you go to jail for notarizing a family member in Florida?

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