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June 11, 2016

Signing Trac

Here is what Notaries are saying about this outfit
http://www.123notary.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=5761

36768
“I just did a simple loan mod agreement for them at the end of Feb. 15 min appointment tops and I submitted my request for payment on 3/1/2016 and they paid me just now via Deluxe Online checks. 3/7/2016 so they paid within 1 week of billing. They only allow you to submit your invoices at the beginning of the following month. Example. All jobs done in Feb can be submitted on Mar 1st and so on. No troubles here so far.”

dawnrin
“I’ve been doing little signings for them lately. They’ve all been HELOC appts. The docs are at the borrower’s house and I’m in and out in about 20 minutes. They pay $50 for the signing as no printing nor faxbacks are necessary. Plus, they don’t send you further than about 10 miles for this fee. You bill them monthly now. I emailed them my Nov. invoice on Dec. 1st and was sent a Deluxe e-check the very next day! I don’t know what changed, but it seems to be working for now.”

peanut20
“I just did a signing for them and I was paid within 1 week, they are now paying through the deluxe check payment system, I was actually a bit amazed how quick they were.”

dhelmic2
“I have done several signing for them and can’t remember why I keep taking them. I get paid, but have to wait way too long for payment.”

Florida Girl (7-02-14)
“I have completed two signings for them recently.
1st was on Friday 4/18/14 and I have not been paid for it yet.
2nd and I am not sure why I accepted that without being paid for the first was on 6/21/14”

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Global Notary
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The 90 days no payment list of signing companies
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=15887

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February 26, 2016

July 27, 2015

How to start a successful signing company from scratch

Filed under: Marketing Articles — Tags: , , , — admin @ 10:06 am

There are many in this business who want to create vast empires in record breaking amounts of time without knowing what they are doing and without having control over what they are doing. Then there are others who think small and never try to grow their practice. My advice is to grow your practice, but step by step.

There are signing companies out there who are nationwide. They have databases of tens of thousands of notaries. Their phones are ringing off the hook and if they can’t handle the pressure they crack. There are other signing companies that are too large, and don’t take responsibility to pay their notaries on time. Then, there are what I call boutique signing companies. Those are the companies that I like.

A boutique signing company is one that started out as a Notary, and then gradually started hiring more and more people on call. They often do most of the work themselves in the beginning. Then little by little a gradually higher percentage of the work is done by carefully selected staff. These smaller signing companies often charge more, cover a smaller area such as a handful of counties, and do a better job. The main thing in this business is to protect your reputation. You need people to feel safe giving a job to you. With some of these other signing companies, they might screw up!

Another thing to consider is where to pick your notaries and how to train them. Smart signing companies hand pick their notaries. Smart signing companies train people by hand until they are sure that the notaries will do the job the way they like it done. Sometimes it is easier to pick beginners and train them. Why is this? It is because experienced notaries already think they know it all, and are not receptive to new (or correct) ways of doing things. Regardless of who you pick, or how much experience they have (or how arrogant they are,) try to train, screen and then pick people who you are absolutely sure can get the job done right. Once people are working for you, keep them on a short leash. The minute you are not watching people, they will take liberties, and you could end up in a heap of trouble.

Many notaries complain about signing companies who micromanage. Unfortunately, they get a better result by keeping their notaries under their nose. I do the same when I hire people new. The minute the relationship gets distant, the quality of the work is likely to go downhill. There are exceptions to the rule. Carmen and I only talk from time to time, but she has 13 years of experience working for me and is a pro at what she does. I don’t need to babysit her. She has earned her right to autonomy — but, other people have not! So, watch what others are doing, or pay the price!

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You want to get paid well as a Notary, but do you merit a good rate?
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July 26, 2014

Do not call the Title Company?

Filed under: General Articles — Tags: , , — admin @ 8:56 pm

One notary had instructions from the signing company that said, “Do not call the Title Company”
He felt that those instructions meant — if you want to get paid, call the Title Company, otherwise you are a sucker!

One of the most ill-reputed signing companies (you’ll recognize the name if you hear it) used this technique. Then, they sent a partial payment for several of the loans the notary signed — it was enough to confuse his bookkeeping and get him off their back.

Title companies have a reputation, and can also fire the signing company which would be a huge loss of revenue for the signing company. The Title company can be your best ally in a billing dispute. Try the Attorney General as well if all else fails.

Many of our most seasoned Notaries tell us that if a signing company refuses to pay you, going straight to the Title company can often be the fastest, easiest and most effective way to get paid. We recommend invoicing the signing company three times before resorting to this tactic. Invoice once after the job is completed. Then invoice again after 30 days, and once more after 45 days. We consider the bill to be badly delinquent if sixty days go by without a payment. We also have what we call our letter from hell which almost guarantees you will get paid. This letter template is available to the public if you click on our link below the text about the comprehensive guide to getting paid by signing companies.

As a general rule, if a company tells you not to confirm with the borrowers or not to call the Title company, it sounds very fishy and a potential cause for a lot of trouble. Since so many signing companies are fishy, I would think twice before working for one that displays such evident red flags.

Tweets:
(1) One notary had instructions from the signing company that said, “Do not call the Title Company”

You might also like:

A comprehensive guide to getting paid by signing companies.
http://www.123notary.com/howto-get-paid-signing-agent.htm

How to get paid by out of biz signing companies
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=8646

Getting what is due, a clever plan
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=3221

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July 1, 2014

I’ll stay here all day until I get paid!

I was speaking with one of our fellow notaries and in that conversation he shared a little story on collecting funds that were due to him from a particular company. I don’t remember now if it was a signing company or not but it really doesn’t matter. He like the rest of us know that times are lean. There are very few signings now and when you do get a signing and perform the duties asked of you, naturally you expect to be paid for them. Nonetheless, he like many of you have had problems collected fees that are due to you after the job is completed.

So it seems that in this particular case this company owed our notary quite a bit of money. The notary had tried to no avail (phone calls emails, etc) to get this company to pay. Nothing worked. So the notary felt enough is enough. Time to take action! He had a plan.

He got up early, packed up his ‘mobile office’ along with his lunch and proceeded to go to where the company’s office was located. He walked into their office announced himself to one of the person’s behind the desk and asks to speak with accounts payable. He was told they were unavailable. So he tells the office clerk, ” Ok, well, I’ll wait”. He then proceeds to go sit down, takes out his equipment (which included a small portable table) and commenced to working as if he was at his own office. (now I am laughing so hard, I am almost on the floor. I am loving this so much). The folks behind the counter are bewildered/shocked to say the least.

He begins answering calls, booking appointments, doing his emails, etc. A girl behind the counter who is watching him, leaves (we assume to go into the back office to tell ’somebody’ what was going on. When she returns she told him that he’ll have to leave and come back. He polietly refused. He let her know he would stay all day if it was necessary….he had done the work, needed to be paid and would not be leaving until somebody cut him a check.

He continues doing his work….even asks to use their copy machine and printer. (Now, I am just dying of laughter.) But guess what, after about a couple of hours of them seeing that he was serious about not leaving…somebody in the back office cut him a check so he could be on his way…and yes, it cleared the bank! 🙂

All I’ll say is BRAVO! Well done!

Until next time…..be well and safe! — Carmen

Tweets:
(1) He said he would stay in their office until he got paid. He answered phones, printed docs in the mean time.
(2) They decided to cut him a check to get him to leave their office. It worked!

You might also like:

How to get paid by out of business signing companies
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=8646

Getting what is due, a clever plan!
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=3221

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March 13, 2014

Who really needs who?

I received a call the other day from a disgruntled signing service. (they will remain nameless). The owner/operator was quite angry. It appeared that a notary he had hired from 123 had called one of his title companies and had some not so nice things to say about him and his company. And now he wanted retribution, demanded it. He wanted this particular notary to be removed immediately from the 123notary website. I told him that we just don’t remove notaries based on one-sided stories. I asked him to provide me with details as to what happened and all I was able to get out of him was that the notary had taken it upon herself to call his title company and was ‘bad mouthing him’. The next question I asked him, was why would she do this? I expressed to him that notaries just don’t exhibit this type of drastic behavior unless something had happened that would cause her to feel that this was her last resort. I never did get an answer. I had my suspicions but kept quiet. 🙂

I told him that I really couldn’t do anything and suggested that he email Jeremy and/or leave a review for this notary on her profile. He didn’t like any of these solutions. He just wanted her taken off. I found the whole thing odd and as our conversation escalated, he says to me, that because of our reluctance to just take her off, it would not be good if other signing services found out we were letting notaries slam them. It would not be good for business. I’m thinking, is this guy serious? He then went on to ask me if I was a notary? Yes, sir. I am a notary. Been a notary now for a total of 14 plus years. He says, “Oh now I understand, all of you notaries think alike”….”Yeah we do, I tell him”. I go on to tell him that none of this sounds right to me and since he refused to tell me what his part in it was, I couldn’t be of much help. It was clear that we would never see things in the same light…..and it was also clear he had something to hide.

Then he says to me something that I will never forget. “If it wasn’t for us (meaning signing services) you guys wouldn’t have any work”. I was like “WHAT”?!?!?!? Are your serious?. I could not believe my ears! I was stunned and shocked. I had to keep what I was really thinking to myself. But I did say; “Do you really believe this? I mean the only reason that title/escrow use signing services is because it is convenient for them”. It was clear he did not like that answer. 🙂 The truth of the matter is that although they may be convenient for title/escrow, no-one really needs signing services but they do need commissioned notary publics who travel. And if every signing company fell off the the face of the earth, the folks in the mortgage industry would still use and need us…and this is a fact. What were they doing before the signing services got on the scene and took over? Calling notaries direct, thats what. And some of them still do call direct. They want that one on one experience.

On that note we ended the conversation as it was going nowhere. And after I hung up I just couldn’t believe that this signing company had the nerve to say this to me and he actually believed this. I think he has got this whole ‘who needs who twisted’ Or he thinks I am pretty stupid…….but even worse, I wonder how many other signing companies believe this nonsense as well?

Like the title says….who really needs who?

Until the next time…be safe!

Tweets:
(1) If the signing companies all fell off the face of the planet, Title companies would call notaries directly.
(2) A notary reported the signing co to the Title company, and the signing company was not happy!
(3) He wanted us to remove a notary. I told him we don’t remove notaries based on one-sided stories
(4) Al: “If it weren’t for us signing services, notaries wouldn’t work!” Carmen thinking: “Is this guy serious?”
(5) The only reason Title/Escrow use signing services is that it is “convenient” for them!
(6) Who really needs who? Do notaries need signing services? Do Title co’s need signing services?

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We should be setting the fees, not the other way around
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Rich man poor man, market yourself to the wealthy
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July 22, 2010

Getting paid – the ins and outs

Many notaries complain to us that they don’t always get paid for their work.

We are very sympathetic. However,  sympathy alone will not help. There are some
simple methods we teach that can save you a lot of grief in the long run. Just follow our steps and you will stay out of trouble.

Accepting jobs from new companies.
When offered a job from an unknown company, ask for references. If they don’t want to give references, that is an easy way to screen them out. If they seem legitimate, you can accept the job. However, immediately after accepting the job, you should do a background check. Background checks can be done on the net in minutes and are easy.

Background check companies that call you
Look companies up on the BBB, 123notary’s list of signing companies, 123notary’s forum, and Notaryrotary’s forum. If you are on the road, use 123notary.com/S where you can look up signing companies on your mobile phone in less than one minute. If a company has more than 10% of reviews posted about them that are serious complaints, think twice about working for them. You are likely to get cheated or have a bad experience.

Track how long it takes particular companies to pay you.
If you regularly work for a particular company, keep track of when jobs got done, and how soon you got paid. You can create statistics on the average amount of days it takes for each company to pay you. If they take more than 60 days, that is seriously delinquent, and you should not work for a company that is regularly delinquent.

Keep good records.
You need to have a separate file for each company that uses you. Its best to use a computer database. Always backup your work and perhaps printout paper records regularly. You need to know who assigned what job on what date, and then check off that job once it gets paid. Write down the date you received payment and the check number. Keep the check stub too.

Have a line of credit for each company.
If signing company “X” owes you $600 and wants you to do more jobs for them, I suggest having them pay you what they owe you before you do any more work for them. Give each company a maximum amount that they can owe you and don’t do any jobs if you are over that number. I suggest starting companies out with a limit of $200 total, and don’t work for them if they owe you anything for more than 45 days. If you have gotten three paychecks from them, you can raise the limit to $300. If you have gotten ten timely paychecks from them, raise the limit to $500. But, the minute a single job goes more than 45 days without pay, stop work for them ASAP, or you could get cheated out of everything. Many notaries get strung along by companies and get cheated out of thousands.

Bill regularly
If you work for a company, they will not always automatically pay you. You have to send weekly invoices for whatever jobs they haven’t paid you for. Make sure you mark off which job they paid for and what the CHECK NUMBER was. If you don’t keep this information and keep check stubs, you will get cheated. If they owe you money more than 30 days, start calling them weekly about what they owe. If they owe you for a single job for more than 45 days, stop working for them until you get paid.

Low pay?
Many notaries complain about companies that don’t pay much. Its better to get low pay than no pay. Times are hard and many people are out of work. Take what you can get. If you are a fancy notary with great connections, you can pick and choose what work you take. If you are desperate for cash, you should take low paying jobs from reputable companies. However, don’t take work from companies with a track record of non-payment, or you will be working for free.

What if companies still don’t pay?
Use our template of a demand letter on http://www.123notary.com/howto-get-paid-signing-agent.htm
This letter works 90% of the time. The times it doesn’t work is when the company is basically no longer in business, or insolvent.

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