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January 26, 2021

An intergallactic Notary conflict

Filed under: General Stories — admin @ 1:33 pm

This is kind of silly. We have one Notary named Deborah Planet, and another named Venus. I am thinking that these Notaries are in dire need of some slogans.

For the best Notary in this world, call me — Deborah Planet
For a Notary that is out of this world, call me — Venus Smithfield
For a Notary that doesn’t have a dark side, call me — Sandy Looney

But, we have no Notaries called Mars or Mercury. Those could be company names.

Mercury Notary Service — we rise when the temperature goes up.
Mars Notary Service — we declared war on the competition and were both wiped out, but got reincarnated and started again. This doesn’t make sense.

Saturn Notary Service — We run rings around the competition
Jupiter Notary Service — We have 6x more gravity when it comes to keeping clients happy and keeping them around. Oh, and we won’t leave our signature “spot” on the documents either — that stays on the planet. No signing in red please either unless you are into that.
Mercury Notary Service — A signing service that is never in retrograde, or at least not for you.

I’ll end this with one of my signature jokes.

UFO PEOPLE — Hello earthling

HUMAN — are you going to abduct me?

UFO PEOPLE — No but can you like us on Facebook?

HUMAN — Earth Facebook or intergallactic Facebook? Is that censored too?

UFO PEOPLE — We politely decline to say. We don’t have freedom of speech on our planet. Our 1st amendment was cancelled due to a virus that happened 1723 years ago.

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September 6, 2018

UPL — Unauthorized Practice of Law in the Notary Profession

Unauthorized practice of law… what does this phrase really mean? The sad truth is that this concept is widely misunderstood, and differs from state to state. The definition of UPL (not UPS) is generally arbitrary and is often set by bar associations set on protecting the financial interests of their Attorneys who don’t want any unnecessary competition in the legal services field. So, one could say that Attorneys as a group are engaged in a form of corruption and using the law to enforce standards that serve no purpose other than to eliminate competition (sounds like the mafia). Instead of burying you in cement, a bar association can investigate a person suspected of UPL, and sue them or perhaps fine them for huge mounts of money leaving the Notary essentially financially broken.

Case Study
One of the Notaries listed on our site lost or almost lost (forgot the story as it was from a decade or more ago) $40,000 for doing a loan signing in a state where Notaries are not allowed to do such things.

Attorney States
In certain states that we refer to as Attorney States, only Attorneys are allowed to do loan signings. The premise is that by engaging in the facilitation of a loan signing, that you are making an unstated assertion that you have the same knowledge as a Mortgage Broker, Lender or Attorney and that you can explain the documents. This is simply not true. When a Notary goes to a loan signing, some Notaries do not explain any terms or documents while some do. In my opinion you should catch a Notary in the act explaining a legal term and then bust them. But, merely by facilitating the signing a loan in an Attorney state, a Notary can get busted.

States where Notaries are not supposed to facilitate the signing of loans include Georgia, South Carolina, Massachusetts and perhaps others. This information could be outdated and the interpretation of the rules is far beyond my capacity. However, many Notaries in all of these states advertise on 123notary claiming that they do signings. However, I have heard that they typically don’t do signings for properties that are in their state, but only for out of state properties. I have heard that this is still illegal, but I guess people are not getting caught. My word of advice is to consult an Attorney before doing something that could get you in trouble.

Notary unauthorized practice of law
As a general rule, drafting a legal document, giving legal advice, giving advice about a court case, giving advice about how to draft a legal document, or helping to interpret a legal document might be construed as unauthorized practice of law. However, I am not an Attorney and cannot say with any certainty or authority what constitutes UPL in any state. I am just relaying to you what I have read over the years. Additionally, explaining the terms of a loan or what certain mortgage terms mean might be considered UPL as well – once again, I am not sure, but you can ask an Attorney if you really want a definitive answer.

Choosing the Notary Act
As a Notary Public, it is the choice of the client or signer which type of Notary act they want. The Notary has the right to explain the various Notary acts to them and the rules that apply, but the Notary cannot choose for them. Under many circumstances there might only be one particular Notary act that the Notary would legally be able to perform. In such a case, the Notary should explain the circumstances, how to change the circumstances and ask if the signer wants to proceed as is.

It is common for Notaries while administering Jurats to automatically perform an Affirmation because they are afraid to offend people by administering an Oath. First of all the Notary is required to give the signer a choice as to which Notary act they want to have performed. Second, many people might be offended by Affirmations more than by Oaths. However, I can state with definitiveness that dogs prefer Affirmations.

Drawing in a Signature Line
It used to be common in loan signings for a document to have no signature line, yet have an instruction that it must be notarized. You cannot notarize a document without a signature, and how can you sign without a signature line? If the borrower draws in the line, that is their business, but if the Notary does it, are they practicing law?

Oregon Standards
I have heard that in Oregon, a Notary may not cross anything out on a Notary certificate, nor may they attach a new Notary certificate. But actions would be considered practicing law there as far a I know in my layperson capacity.

Summary
Unauthorized Practice of Law is a crime and is a very wishy-washy state-specific convoluted subject. Please ask an Attorney for a professional opinion on this subject if you are at all concerned.

.

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13 ways to get sued as a Notary
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19614

10 risks to being a Mobile Notary Public
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19459

Notary loses $4000 in legal fees because fraud adds name to notary certificate.
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19477

5 books every notary should own and read
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=3668

.

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December 12, 2017

The Notary Profession is a Profession — act like it is!

Filed under: Marketing Articles,Popular on Twitter — Tags: — admin @ 3:52 am

Carmen and I are tired of Notaries treating the Notary profession as if it is a quick way to make some cash on the side — Make a few extra bucks — five bucks here, ten bucks there. This is a very bad way to look at the profession. First of all, there is liability in this profession. You can get sued even if you don’t do anything wrong. People are doing big deals that are being Notarized. If something goes wrong, they can sue you for a few thousand dollars. If the Lender did something fraudulent, you might get wrongfully sued too. If you put your package in a drop box that doesn’t get picked up and the borrower loses their lock — guess what could happen? You get the idea.

The root of the problem lies with the states who mostly have low requirements or no requirements for being a Notary. If you are 18 or over, not a felon and are breathing, you can be a Notary. Being a notary is a profession that safeguards the transactions of multi-million dollar estates. Any lack of integrity or caution on the part of the Notary can lead to disaster.

Imagine that you Notarize John Hancock only to find out he was a different John Hancock and siphoned a million dollars of equity from someone’s estate. You might end up in court as a witness, accomplice, or get sued for negligence. You have no idea what you are playing with in this profession. You have to be careful what you put your stamp on. You might step on a mine.

Many Notaries also think that because their state has minimal requirements, that it is not necessary to go above and beyond your state minimum Notarial behavior — this is wrong. If you don’t keep a journal, don’t use an embosser and don’t thumbprint, you can get in huge trouble.

Think of state requirements like you think of speed limits. If the law says you can go 100 on the highway as was the case in Montana in the past and perhaps present, that doesn’t mean you are safe doing so. There could be deadly accidents. Just because you slow down to 95, you think you are being prudent, but are you really? You are still going faster than is safe. You can blame the state, but you are responsible for your own behavior.

Most professions have licensing tests that you have to take every year or two. Some professions make you take a test of 200 questions to make sure you understand all of the regulations and standards in your industry. The Notary profession has NNA tests that are taken every year or two. California has an exam you take every four years. But, people complain when I want to ask a few questions. People try to convince me that they know it all and don’t need to be tested because of all of the years they have been in business. These are the same people who score 20% on my quizzes.

Once again, the Notary profession is a profession — treat it like one. You should be quizzed every year on all the sites you are on. Since the states do not test your competency, I am forced to. It is a huge waste of my time and really frustrating dealing with all these resistant and incompetent people who think they are so smart.

If you really are so smart, just answer the questions, get an A, and then get on with your day. It would take two minutes to test people if they just knew the answers. The problem is that they resist, and then have to think about everything I ask, and then want to argue, and I need to teach them things and a simple quiz can take fifteen minutes that should take two minutes if I were dealing with professionals. How upsetting and what a waste ot my time.

To be a professional you need to do more than study. You need to master the art of being a Notary. You need to know everything and skip the snow job of trying to convince others you know everything when you don’t. The con jobs are getting very old. I have heard it all too many times. I really don’t even want to list such people. 123notary is a directory for professionals, not posers. At least that is the word young people use these days. When I was growing up we didn’t use that king of language, we said fakers.

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I’m a high end notary in a low-ball world
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22263

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October 14, 2012

Did you know? Random interesting notary facts…

Filed under: (5) State specific — Tags: , , — admin @ 6:43 am

Did you know?
 
Did you know that Louisiana Notaries are required by law to carry Errors and Omissions insurance?
 
Virginia and Kentucky notaries can notarize outside of their state providing the documents are to be recorded in state.
 
Commissioners in West Virginia can notarize in or outside of the state for documents to be recorded in the state.
 
In Washington DC, you can become a government notary if you work for the federal government, no matter what state you live in. You could live in Alaska and be a DC Government Notary!
 
Notaries in North Carolina are not permitted to charge ANY travel fee.  Notaries in roughly eight other states have severe restrictions on travel fees that would make it impossible to legally make a living as a mobile notary!  See details in the forum if you look up the term “travel fee”.
 
Notaries in Maine, South Carolina and Florida can solemnize marriages? Did you know that?  I do!
 
North Dakota allows out of state notaries to apply for a notary commission in their state if they live in a county that borders on North Dakota!

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Interesting and uncommon notary acts

Acknowledgment FAQ
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=21331

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June 30, 2012

Can a notary public act as a witness?

Filed under: Witnessing — Tags: , , , — admin @ 12:13 pm

Can a notary public act as a witness? 

We already have a very thorough blog entry entitled:
 
Can a notary be a witness?
 
That contains all pertinent details regarding notary witness requirements and procedures.  To sum it up, a notary can act as a witness in any state in their capacity as an individual.   However, in Delaware, and Washington State, and perhaps a few other states, a notary can do witnessing as an official notary act, and charge an official fee set by the state for their services.
 
Is it better to hire a notary to be a witness?
Since notaries work exclusively with signers, signatures, documents, foms, certificates, etc., many people feel that notaries are better equipt to handle the (not so vigorous) responsibilities associated with being a witness.  Additionally, notaries have been screened by their state and are more likely to be honest upstanding citizens — or at least that is what many of us like to think.  The reality is that some notaries have no idea what they are doing, while others are very particular about witnessing, and documenting information in conjunction with witnessing. 
 
Why would it matter who you picked as a witness?
If someone witnesses a document signing or a Will signing, it doesn’t matter much who they are provided they are at least 18 years of age.  On the other hand, if the witness ever needs to be contacted after the fact, it is good if the witness has lived in the same place for a long time so you know where to reach them.  If your witness works for the circus or lives in a caravan and moves around a lot, you might never see them again. Having a witness who is a notary might help if they provide some extra documentation for you. Additionally, a mobile notary supposedly knows how to show up at the appointed place at the appointed time and might be more reliable with logistics.

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Types of witnesses in the Notary profession
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=5664

Credible Witnesses from A to Z
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=452

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December 2, 2011

Contact information for state notary divisions 2011 & 2012

Contact information for state notary divisions.
 
We already have a page on 123notary.com with contact information for all notary divisions in all states plus Washington DC. However, we noticed that the information keeps changing, and it is hard to keep up with my webmasters to keep the changes up to date.  So, the beauty of blogging is that I can edit information when I want, or create a new list altogether!  So, here is my late 2011 list of notary divisions with current web addresses, etc.
 
Alabama Secretary of State
http://www.sos.state.al.us/adminservices/notarypublic.aspx
334-242-7200
State Capitol Building – Suite S-105
600 Dexter Avenue
Montgomery, AL 36103

Alaska Lieutenant Governor
http://ltgov.alaska.gov/treadwell/notaries.html
907-465-3509
There is no training or testing at this time – however a training course is recommended.
notary@alaska.gov
 
Arizona Department of State – Office of the Secretary of State
http://azsos.gov/business_Services/notary/
(602) 542-4285
Capitol Executive Tower, 7th Floor
1700 West Washington Street
Phoenix, AZ 85007-2888
 
Arkansas Secretary of State Notary Public Division
http://www.sos.arkansas.gov/BCS/Pages/notaryPublic.aspx
501-682-1010
State Capitol, RM 256
Little Rock, AR 72201

California Secretary of State Notary Division
http://www.sos.ca.gov/business/notary/
(916) 653-3595
1500 11th Street, 2nd Floor
Sacramento, CA 95814

Colorado Secretary of State
http://www.sos.state.co.us/
303-894-2200 & press 2
Colorado Department of State
1700 Broadway
Denver, CO 80290
 
Connecticut Secretary of the State
http://www.ct.gov/sots/cwp/view.asp?a=3184&q=392266
860-509-6003
860-509-6002
30 Trinity Street, Hartford, CT 06106

Delaware – State of Delaware Notary Public
http://notary.delaware.gov/
302-739-4111
notary@delaware.gov
 
District of Columbia: Office of the Secretary
Washington DC Office of Notary Commissions and Authentications
http://os.dc.gov/os/cwp/view,a,1207,q,522462,osNav,%7C31374%7C.asp
(202) 727-3117
441 4th Street, NW
Room 810S
Washington, DC 20001
 
Florida Department of State Division of Corporations Apostille Certification
http://notaries.dos.state.fl.us/
(850) 488-7146
P.O. Box 6800
Tallahassee, FL 32314-6800
 
Georgia Secretary of State Notary Public & Document Certification
http://www.sos.ga.gov/administration/notary.htm
(404) 327-6023
1875 Century Boulevard
Suite 100
Atlanta, Georgia 30345

Hawaii Department of the Attorney General: Notaries Public
http://hawaii.gov/ag/notary/
(808) 586-1218
425 Queen Street
Honolulu, Hawaii 96813
Hours of Operation: 7:45am to 12:00pm Monday to Friday
 
Idaho Secretary of State: Notaries, Apostilles and Authentications
http://www.sos.idaho.gov/notary/npindex.htm
(208) 332-2810
dfarnsworth@sos.idaho.gov
Secretary of State
PO Box 83720
450 N 4th Street
Boise ID 83720-0080
 
Illinois Secretary of State Notary Division
http://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/departments/index/notary/home.html
1-800 252-8980
213 State Capitol
Springfield, IL 62756
 
Indiana Secretary of State Business Services Division: Notary
http://www.in.gov/sos/business/2378.htm
317-232-6581
302 W. Washington Street Room E018
Indianapolis, IN 46204
 
Iowa Secretary of State
http://www.sos.state.ia.us/notaries/index.html
515-281-8993
sos@sos.state.ia.us
1007 East Grand Avenue
Room 105, State Capitol
Des Moines, IA 50319

Kansas: State of Kansas Office of the Secretary of State
http://www.kssos.org/business/business_notary.html
(785) 296-4564
Kansas Secretary of State
Memorial Hall, 1st Floor
120 SW 10th Avenue
Topeka, KS 66612-1594

Kentucky Secretary of State Administrative Services: Overview of Notaries
http://www.sos.ky.gov/adminservices/notaries/
(502) 564-3490
Office of the Secretary of State
Notary Branch
PO Box 821
700 Capital Avenue, Suite 158
Frankfort, KY  40601
 
Louisiana Secretary of State: Louisiana Notary Division
http://www.sos.la.gov/tabid/70/Default.aspx
225.922.0507
8585 Archives Ave.
Baton Rouge, LA 70809

Maine Department of the Secretary of State Bureau of Corporations, Elections & Commissions
http://www.maine.gov/sos/cec/notary/
207-624-7736
cec.notaries@maine.gov
Burton Cross Building
111 Sewall St., 4th Floor
 
Maryland Office of the Secretary of State: Maryland Notary Division
http://www.sos.state.md.us/Notary/Notary.aspx
410-974-5521
16 Francis Street,
Annapolis, MD 21401
 
Massachusetts Secretary of the Commonwealth Public Records Division: Notary Public Information
http://www.sec.state.ma.us/pre/prenot/notidx.htm
617-725-4016
617-727-2832
pre@sec.state.ma.usSecretary of the Commonwealth
Public Records Division
McCormack Building, Room 1719
One Ashburton Place
Boston, MA 02108

Michigan Department of State: Notary & Document Certification
http://www.michigan.gov/sos/0,4670,7-127-15049-25634–,00.html
(888) 767-6424
Michigan Department of State,
Lansing, MI 48918
 
Minnesota Secretary of State Notary Division
http://www.sos.state.mn.us/
651-296-2803
60 Empire Drive, Suite 100
St Paul, MN  55103
 
Mississippi Secretary of State Business Services: Notary Public
http://www.sos.state.ms.us/busserv/notaries/NotaryFAQs.asp
Sorry, but there was no contact information on their site!
 
Missouri Secretary of State Business Services: Notary Public
http://www.sos.mo.gov/business/commissions/pubs/notary/
(573) 751-4936
600 West Main Street
Jefferson City, MO 65101
 
Montana Notary Division
http://sos.mt.gov/notary/Become_Notary.asp
(406) 444-5379
sosnotary@mt.gov
1236 6th Avenue
Helena, MT 59601

Nebraska Secretary of State Business Services: Notary Public
http://www.sos.ne.gov/business/notary/index.html
(402) 471-2558
State Capitol, Room 1301,
Lincoln, NE 68509

New Hampshire Secretary of State Notary Public Division
http://www.sos.nh.gov/notary.html
603-271-3242
State House Room 204, 
Concord, NH 03301
 
New Jersey Secretary of the Treasury: Notary Public
http://www.nj.gov/treasury/revenue/dcr/programs/notary.shtml
Division of Revenue, Notary Public Unit ,
PO Box 452,
Trenton, NJ 08646
 
New Mexico Secretary of State Notary Division
http://www.sos.state.nm.us/sos-notary.html
505)-827-3600
Secretary of State,
State Capitol North, Suite 300,
Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501

New York Department of State
http://www.dos.state.ny.us/licensing/
(518) 474-4429
Department of State, Albany Location:
One Commerce Plaza, 99 Washington Ave
Albany, NY 12231-0001
 
North Carolina Notary Division
http://www.secretary.state.nc.us/notary/
919-807-2219
North Carolina Department of the Secretary of State
P.O. Box 29626
Raleigh, North Carolina 27626-0626

North Dakota Notary Division
http://www.nd.gov/sos/notaryserv/
701-328-2900
Secretary of State
State of North Dakota
600 E Boulevard Ave Dept 108, 1st Floor
Bismarck ND 58505-0500
 
Ohio Notary Division
http://www.sos.state.oh.us/SOS/recordsIndexes/Notary.aspx
614-644-4559
Ohio Secretary of State
180 E. Broad St., Suite 103
Columbus, OH 43215

Oklahoma Notary Division
https://www.sos.ok.gov/notary/default.aspx
405-521-2516
Notary Public services
Secretary of State
2300 N. Lincoln Blvd, Room 101
Oklahoma City, OK 73105-4897
 
Oregon Notary Division
http://www.filinginoregon.com/pages/notary/
503-986-2200
Public Service Building 255 Capitol Street NE Suite 151
Salem, Oregon 
Pennsylvania
http://www.dgs.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/community/notaries/12609
717-787-5280
Bureau of Commissions, Elections and Legislation
Division of Legislation and Notaries
210 North Office Building
Harrisburg, PA 17120

 
Rhode Island Notary Division
http://sos.ri.gov/business/notary/
401-222-3040
148 West River Street
Providence, RI 02904-2615
 
South Carolina Notary Division
http://www.scsos.com/notaries
1205 Pendleton Street Suite 525
Columbia, SC 29201
 
South Dakota Notary Division
http://apps.sd.gov/applications/ST12ODRS/aspx/frmNotaryViewList.aspx
605-773-3537
 
Tennessee Notary Division
http://www.tn.gov/sos/bus_svc/notary.htm
615-741-3699
Division of Business Services
312 Rosa L. Parks Avenue, Snodgrass Tower, 6th Floor
Nashville, TN 37243

Texas Notary Division
http://www.sos.state.tx.us/statdoc/edinfo.shtml
512-463-5705
Secretary of State, Notary Public Unit, P.O. Box 13375,
Austin, Texas 78711-3375
 
Utah Notary Division
http://notary.utah.gov/
801-538-1041
Utah State Capitol, Notary Office, Suite 220,
Salt Lake City, UT 84114
 
Vermont Notary Division
http://vermont-archives.org/notary/
802-828-3287
Secretary’s Office
128 State Street
Montpelier, VT  05633-1101

Virginia Notary Division
http://www.commonwealth.virginia.gov/Notary/notary.cfm?CFID=10410718&CFTOKEN=e9bab8f65217a483-C5004CEA-B189-F028-4D9FC1D229C03EBD
804-692-2536
Jennifer Crown, Notary Director
Office of the Secretary of the Commonwealth
P.O. Box 1795
Richmond, Virginia 23218-1795

Washington State Notary Division
http://www.dol.wa.gov/business/notary/nrequirements.html
360-664-1550
405 Black Lake Blvd SW
Olympia, WA 98502

West Virginia Notary Division
http://www.sos.wv.gov/business-licensing/notaries/Pages/default.aspx
 
Wisconsin Notary Division
http://www.sos.state.wi.us/
608-266-8888, then press 3
The Office of the Secretary of State
P.O. Box 7848
Madison, WI 53707 – 7848

Wyoming Notary Division
http://soswy.state.wy.us/AdminServices/NotariesDuties.aspx
307-777-5335
State Capitol Building
200 West 24th Street
Cheyenne, WY 82002-0020

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January 23, 2011

Flashpoint — Notary job for a hostage with a multimillion dollar contract

Dave had a multimillion dollar contract for a very rare biotech machine that was one of a kind. He was to meet the buyer in a high rise downtown. But, Dave was taken hostage in the lobby 10 minutes before the signing. The subject (Tom) needed the machine to save his brother who was dying of a rare disease.

TOM: (Pointing gun) Drop the briefcase and come with me.

DAVE: I can’t, this is a very important contract.

TOM: I’m afraid you don’t have a choice.

SECURITY: Help, 911, there’s a man with a gun. Send a strategic response team immediately!

TOM: Drop your cell phone and slide it over to me. Now, Dave, I need that machine you’re selling for my sick brother. I have no choice. I have to do this. Let’s go upstairs to where the buyer is waiting.

.

You might also like:

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http://blog.123notary.com/?p=17017

Shark Tank: 123notary wants to sell 10% of its shares
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16021

Compilation of Notary sit-com episodes
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=15949

.

(The two of them go upstairs)

NOTARY: Hi, I’m the Notary, and by the way, did you find me on 123notary.com?

TOM: I wasn’t the one who made the call.

DAVE: Yes you were.

NOTARY: Oh great, can you write a review for me on my listing.

TOM: This is not the time to be talking about reviews (waving gun around.)

NOTARY: Oh, did you want me to notarize your gun?

TOM: NO. I want the biotech machine to save my dying brother.

(ring ring)

TOM: Don’t answer that. I’ll get this.

GREG: Hi, this is Sargeant Greg Parker from the strategic response unit. I understand you have a hostage up there.

TOM: Yes Greg, we do.

GREG: That was a smart thing to do, taking a hostage. That really changes the game.

TOM: What are you, a professional negotiator?

GREG: Yes Tom, that is what I am. I’m here to try to work out your situation. Would you mind telling me your name?

TOM: Um, I can’t. I didn’t want to do this. I just need the machine to save my dying brother. I’ve never done anything like this (waving gun) Stand back!

GREG: Is the machine in the building where you are?

TOM: They won’t tell me where it is. And even if I have it, I don’t know how it works.

GREG: Sounds like one of the guns our team uses that’s in storage. I don’t know where it is, or how it works. If I press the wrong button, only God knows what will happen.

TOM: What?

(crash — Jules rams the door and barges into the room)

JULES: Put your weapons down!!!!

ED: Put your weapons down…

JULES: There’s only one weapon, so let’s use the singular.

ED: Copy that!!! Sir, I’m going to have to ask you to put your gun down.

NOTARY: I have a seal, should I drop my seal? I think of it as kind of a weapon.

ED: Yes, put the seal on the table.

GREG: Do you have the solution?

ED: I have the solution, and Jules has eyes on the subject although he’s nothing much to look at.

JULES: Hey, I like him. It’s just that I’m (oops) not allowed to talk about them… Sam… since that’s a conflict of interest.

GREG: I’ll pretend that I didn’t hear that so I don’t get fired. Now, put down the weapon so that we can talk this over.

TOM: I need that machine.

GREG: That’s not going to happen. We can’t give you that machine. But, if you don’t put your gun down, we’ll have to use lethal force against you. Do you understand that? They your brother will die and so will you.

TOM: No, I won’t!!!

GREG: Okay…. Scorpio

(blast)

GREG: What was that?

ED: It seems to be a gas explosion in another part of the building.

TOM: Okay, I’ll put my gun down. I don’t want to die.

JULES: You came inches from it.

DAVE: You know what, I can let your brother use my machine. But, only under my supervision.

TOM: You will? Gee thanks!

ED: And you can see the whole thing from a monitor — in jail. Put your hands in the air. You have the right to remain silent.

NOTARY: I can give him an Oath of silence. That’s one of my duties as a Notary Public.

Ed: That won’t be necessary.

NOTARY: I also do weddings and bar-mitzvahs.

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June 14, 2024

Overcoming Fear of Technology for a Notary Business

Filed under: General Articles — Tags: — Tom Wilkins @ 12:00 am

In today’s rapidly evolving digital landscape, it’s not uncommon for professionals, including homeowners and business owners involved in notarial services, to feel overwhelmed by technological advancements. This fear can often hinder the growth and efficiency of a notary business. However, embracing technology can significantly enhance your operations, making your services more accessible and reliable. This article will explore practical strategies for a notary business to overcome the fear of technology for a notary business and harness its full potential.

Understanding the Root of Technology Fear

The first step to overcoming the fear of technology for a notary business is understanding its origin. Many notaries experience this fear due to unfamiliarity with digital tools or the misconception that technology may complicate their processes. By acknowledging that when appropriately utilized, technology simplifies tasks, reduces errors, and saves time perspectives, notaries can begin to shift their mindset and embrace digital enhancements in their professional operations.

Education and Training

Education and training are among the most effective strategies to overcome this fear. Engaging in workshops, online courses, and webinars about digital tools designed for notaries can demystify technology and boost confidence. Learning about electronic signatures, digital journals, and online appointment systems can transform how you manage your notary tasks.

Start Small

Begin by integrating small, manageable technological changes into your business practices. This might mean starting with a basic online scheduling system to organize appointments or using digital payment methods for your services. Small successes will build your confidence and encourage further exploration of technological solutions.

Leverage Peer Support

Connecting with other notaries who have successfully integrated technology into their operations can be incredibly beneficial. Peer groups, forums, and professional networks provide insights and firsthand accounts of how technology can enhance service delivery. Sharing experiences and tips can make the transition smoother and less intimidating.

Focus on the Benefits

Focus on the tangible benefits that technology brings to your notary business. For instance, digital records ensure better security and easier document retrieval than traditional paper files. Highlighting technology’s efficiency, accuracy, and security can motivate you to embrace digital tools.

Implement User-Friendly Technology

Choose technology that is user-friendly and well-supported. Many software companies offer robust product support and training, ensuring you feel comfortable and supported as you navigate new systems. User-friendly technology diminishes the fear associated with complex interfaces and steep learning curves.

Regular Updates and Maintenance

Maintaining the technology you adopt is crucial. Regular updates ensure that your systems are secure and function efficiently. Establishing a routine for updates and maintenance can alleviate fears of technology failures and data breaches, reinforcing the reliability of digital tools.

Embrace Technology Confidently

Though initially intimidating, embracing technology in your notary business can be streamlined with the strategies outlined. By acknowledging your fears, committing to ongoing education, taking incremental steps, and keeping the benefits in mind, you can overcome the fear of technology for a notary business and transition from apprehension to expertise. This gradual approach to overcoming technological fears will make technology a reliable partner in your practice and enhance your business’s efficiency and customer satisfaction.

Moreover, as you integrate these technological advancements, complement your knowledge with additional resources, such as understanding the precise notary oath wording, to ensure flawless execution of your notarial duties. The linked resource offers vital information that augments your technological enhancements, preparing you to offer your clients top-notch service. Embrace these changes and observe your notary business’s growth and improved efficiency.

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June 7, 2024

6 Ways to Get More Local Business for a Notary

Filed under: (6) Marketing — Tags: — Tom Wilkins @ 12:00 am

Running a notary business can be both rewarding and challenging. As a notary, your role is crucial in facilitating legal processes, but attracting more clients requires strategic effort. In this post, we’ll explore six effective ways to get more local business for a notary. These tips help homeowners and business owners understand how to make their notary services more visible and appealing within their local communities.

1. Leverage Local SEO

Optimizing your online presence for local searches is essential to getting more local business for a notary. Start by ensuring your business is listed on Google My Business. Complete all the details, including your location, services, and business hours. Encourage satisfied clients to leave positive reviews, boosting your visibility in local search results. Additionally, incorporate local keywords on your website and blog posts to attract traffic from people searching for notary services in your area.

2. Network with Local Businesses

Building relationships with other local businesses can be incredibly beneficial in getting more local business for a notary. Attend local business networking events, join your local chamber of commerce, and connect with real estate agents, law firms, and financial institutions. These industries often require notary services, and establishing a referral network can lead to a steady stream of clients.

3. Offer Mobile Notary Services

Convenience is a significant selling point. Offering mobile notary services can set you apart from competitors who require clients to visit their offices. Promote this service through your website, social media, and local advertising platforms. Highlighting the convenience factor can attract busy homeowners and business owners who need notary services but have tight schedules. Additionally, understanding processes like swears before notary can further enhance your appeal to clients seeking comprehensive and accessible notary services.

4. Utilize Social Media

Social media platforms are powerful tools for increasing visibility and engaging with your community. Create profiles on Facebook, LinkedIn, and Instagram, and regularly post content that showcases your expertise. Share tips about the notary process, success stories, and any special promotions you offer. Engage with your followers by responding to comments and messages promptly. Being active on social media helps build trust and keeps your services top-of-mind.

5. Partner with Community Organizations

Getting involved with community organizations is another excellent way for a notary to attract more local business. Offer your services at local events or partner with non-profits that may need notary services for their operations. Sponsoring local events or offering free workshops on the importance of notarizations can also increase your visibility and credibility within the community.

6. Invest in Online Advertising

While organic reach is valuable, investing in online advertising can substantially enhance your visibility. You can precisely target specific audiences and regions using platforms such as Google Ads and Facebook Ads. Craft ads that emphasize the advantages of your services, including convenience, reliability, and professional knowledge. A strategic advertising campaign can effectively increase local engagement with your notary business.

Boost Your Local Notary Business

To successfully attract more local clients as a notary, it’s essential to effectively blend online and offline strategies to get more local business for a notary. Implementing these methods can substantially boost your local client base and position your notary services as a dependable and trusted resource within your community. The keys to success are visibility and reliability—make it easy for potential clients to find you and demonstrate the dependability of your services to build trust and credibility.

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April 26, 2024

Get Paid Every Time: Notary Billing Strategies

Filed under: General Articles — Tags: — Tom Wilkins @ 12:00 am

As a notary, ensuring consistent and timely payment for your services is crucial, whether you’re assisting homeowners or business owners. Implementing effective billing strategies can significantly enhance financial security and streamline operations. This article will explore key strategies for getting paid for notary services tailored specifically to help notaries professionally.

1. Establish Clear Payment Terms Upfront

The first step in ensuring you get paid every time is to set clear payment terms before you begin any notary work. It’s important to communicate whether you expect payment upon completion of the service or if you offer any deferred payment options. For example, you might require immediate payment for services rendered at closings or real estate transactions but offer terms like net 30 for regular business clients who require ongoing notary services.

2. Utilize Digital Invoicing and Payment Solutions

In today’s digital age, using online payment solutions to get paid for notary services is highly beneficial. These solutions, such as PayPal, allow you to issue invoices directly after the service is completed, making it much easier for your clients to pay promptly. Online payments provide a convenient way for your clients to pay digitally, which can significantly speed up the payment process. This is especially important when dealing with busy homeowners or business owners who appreciate the convenience of digital transactions.

3. Offer Multiple Payment Options

To accommodate the preferences of different clients, it’s beneficial to offer multiple payment options. This can include cash, checks, credit/debit cards, or digital payments. By providing various ways to pay, you reduce the hurdles for prompt payment and cater to your client’s personal or business preferences. For instance, a homeowner might prefer paying via credit card on the spot, whereas a business owner might opt for a bank transfer.

4. Implement Late Payment Penalties

While it may seem harsh, having a penalty for late payments can incentivize your clients to pay on time. Be sure to clearly outline any late fees in your payment terms. Communicate this policy before performing any services to ensure there are no surprises. This approach not only underscores the professionalism of your services but also helps safeguard your cash flow.

5. Follow Up on Invoices

Don’t hesitate to follow up promptly if an invoice goes unpaid. Sending a polite reminder email or making a quick follow-up call can secure payment without further action. Regular communication keeps the lines open, reminding your client of the outstanding payment and your need for resolution.

6. Maintain Detailed Records

Keeping detailed records of your services, including who was billed, how much, and when payments were received, is essential for effective billing. This record-keeping helps follow up on unpaid invoices and is invaluable for financial planning and tax purposes.

7. Educate Your Clients

Sometimes, clients are not fully aware of the importance of notary services. Take the opportunity to educate them about what notaries do and why the fees are justified when getting paid for notary services. A well-informed client is more likely to appreciate the value of your service and, consequently, less likely to delay payment.

Securing Payments as a Notary

Ensuring timely payments for notary services involves clear communication, the use of modern technology, and adhering to professional standards. Notaries should establish clear payment terms, utilize digital invoicing, offer various payment options, enforce late payment penalties, and diligently follow up on invoices. Keeping detailed records and educating clients on the value of notary services is also crucial. Verifying the accuracy of the document date enhances legal and professional integrity. Implementing these strategies helps notaries protect their income and maintain a consistent business flow, ensuring payments are always received on time.

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