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May 23, 2017

How to negotiate signing fees like a pro!

There are several ground rules when it comes to negotiations.

1. The first offer rule
The person who makes the first offer will never get an optimal price. If you start the bidding first with a high price, you might just get declined without being given a chance. If you ask too little, you will miss out on more pay. If you let the other person make the offer, you will end up with more on average.

2. Whining ruins your image
Notaries are notorious for whining. “You only pay $70….. OHHHHHHH, why can’t you pay more?” Who needs this behavior? If you are such a great notary, you would have plenty of people offering you $125 to $150, and you would just hang up on these low-balling fools. But, if you whine like a baby, nobody will want to work with you even if you accept their pathetic offer. Most notaries are so bad, they are probably not even worth what the low-ballers offer them. Most notaries refuse to study to become fastidious professionals.

3. Take it or leave it
Sure, nobody likes fax backs, but don’t complain. You either accept the job or you don’t. If the signing has 300 pages per set of documents, don’t complain. You either say yes or no. When I do my billing, people always ask me, “What did I pay last year?”. My comment is that it doesn’t matter because last year is over, and that doesn’t effect what this year’s price will be. They want to waste my time looking something up for their emotional gratification which affects nothing. What a time waster. Don’t behave like this. If someone makes you an offer, you take it, leave it, or negotiate. If someone wants to politely negotiate with me instead of whining, they will get a lot farther. First of all I will value them more as a long term client. Second, I will know that they will behave professionally with the people who use my site — and I value that much more than how they treat me. Third, it is not a headache to deal with them. If I ask for $200, and you want to offer a polite counter offer, then go ahead. $100 would be rude because it is out of the ballpark. But, what about $150? Try it. I will probably say no, since my prices were computer generated using six inter-connected formulas. But, it doesn’t hurt to ask.

4. Getting companies to up their fee by $35 is possible
But, I know some very fancy notaries who are at the top of their game who get $50 companies to pay $85. These smooth operators get close-by jobs for $85 that are only a few minutes away. They have fast printers that print 45 pages per minute, so the double set of documents takes less than 10 minutes. They buy their toner or ink wholesale. They don’t whine — they PLAN, and they negotiate! So, in a little more than one hour, these seasoned Ninja Notaries get the call, print the documents, go to the job, get it signed, and get back home, and send the invoice. After expenses they probably made almost $70 per hour. Not bad! So, how do they do it?

5. How to impress the client
A seasoned notary will explain calmly how they are famous for doing clean-up jobs after notaries who didn’t know what they were doing ruined a loan. Why not start with a pro and get it done right the first time? How much did you say you offered again? $60? I understand that you are on a tight budget, but my minimum is $100. I can help you out for $85 today though, since I have a little more extra time than I normally do. Wouldn’t it be worth it to you to hire someone who has signed 4000 loans, and who is meticulous? I have state of the art machinery such as an HP 250,000 printer with quadruple trays, and I can explain all of the documents. Would you like to drill me and ask me a sampling of your hardest loan signing questions to see if I am up to your highest standards?

6. Ask them to ask you their toughest question
Most signing companies don’t ask notaries questions. They should. If you ask notaries questions, 90% fall on their face because they don’t have a clue what they are doing. So, if you do know what you are doing, tell the signing company to shop around, but to ask each of the notaries they talk to how they would explain the APR to a non-borrowing spouse. If you don’t get a good answer after 45 minutes, then call me back! No notary with fewer than 5000 signings can do a graceful job of answering this question even though it is ridiculously simple. It requires study, and most notaries are opposed to that idea!

7. Don’t say anything that sounds phony
Please notice that all of the points I made sound real. None of this, “I’m professional and accurate and do error-free signings.” That sounds phony. Make real selling points because you are selling yourself to people who have been in this business for years and have dealt with thousands of notaries — most of them bad ones at that. Figure out what to say that proves that you are the logical choice to hire, even at an inflated rate. After all, the extra pay translates into less aggravation after the fact. How much aggravation and potential re-drawing fees is the $20 savings worth to you anyway, you tell me?

8. Having a pricing formula sounds impressive
If you don’t like to negotiate, but like to use pricing formulas, that will make you look good. People who understand distances, time involved and other expenses are true professionals who know their business inside out. You might not always get the highest possible fee with formulas, but you will get respect and repeat business.

9. Negotiation points summarized:
I do clean-ups for other notaries who make mistakes; 5000 loans signed; ask me your hardest loan signing question and then ask the other notaries who you are calling; I have an HP (name) printer that prints 45 pages per minute. I have a mobile office — beat that. I’m ready now — let’s do this! All work guaranteed or your money back!

A comprehensive guide to Notary pricing
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16504

Can you negotiate prices with SnapDocs?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16236

Negotiating with aggressive callers
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16278

Notary Marketing 102 – Negotiating Fees (a thorough guide)
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19784

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September 19, 2016

Do you negotiate fees correctly over the phone?

Most Notaries study from loan signing classes, but never study the art of negotiation. Negotiating is not hard, but it is an art. Turks, Persians and Indians seem to excel at this while Americans haven’t a clue. In negotiating Notary fees, the secret is to make sure the other person makes an offer first. If you offer first, it might be too low in which case you’ll lose money. Or it might be too high in which case they’ll think you are too expensive and might not want to bargain. If they offer first, you can raise the price by $15 or $20 and still be in their ballpark or just agree if they are being reasonable.

On the other hand, if you want a reputation of charging fair fees for solid work, you can have a pricing formula based on time spent or even have fixed fees, or mileage fees. If you charge $110 per signing, that seems reasonable. They can always bargain you down to $85, and if it’s not too far, you might say yes and make some fast money.

I remember talking to a sub teacher who made $90 per day. Making $85 in two hours including driving and printing is better than $90 in a day. So, you are making more than teachers who are supposed to be the pillars of education in society today.

The other thing to remember is that you have to get your facts and terms straight before you quote a realistic price. If you don’t know how many pages, fax backs, signers, and notarizations there are, you might not give a true price. If you don’t know if the company is fibbing about the # of pages you’re in trouble too. If you don’t know if you get paid if the loan doesn’t fund, you’re in trouble too. Terms are as important as price or anything else. You can negotiate a $500 price, but if the loan doesn’t fund, you might get zilch.

So, put all the cards on the table before you quote your rate. You can quote first, or wait for them to make an offer. Additionally, most Notaries prefer phone offers to emails or texts because they can bargain more easily. You can bargain in any medium. Just state your rate and state your terms by text, email or phone. It is the same — just more delays in feedback.

You might also like:

A comprehensive guide to Notary pricing
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16504

Can you negotiate prices with SnapDocs?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16236

Negotiating with aggressive callers
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16278

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>

September 15, 2019

5 Undeniable Benefits of Hiring a Personal Injury Lawyer

Filed under: Other Guest Bloggers — admin @ 11:24 pm

Accidents are inevitable no matter how careful you are. You get out of some encounters without a scratch while some can end your career and even life. Whichever is the case, experts recommend getting the assistance of a lawyer to deal with such scenarios. Olympia Injury Lawyers is one of the most successful law firms in Washington that offers free consultation to anyone who needs their help. You can also visit their website for counselling and take advantage of these benefits.

They Take Your Stress
If you just faced an accident, you wouldn’t be in the condition to deal with legal matters. People don’t easily give up where there is money involved. You will most probably have to fight in order to get your right from the insurance company. Many get overwhelmed by the stress and don’t proceed further. An injury lawyer will take your stress upon himself.

You Get Better Offer
Even when the company agrees to pay you, they will do everything they can to minimize that amount. Unless you know how to negotiate with them, you won’t get your due right. A professional injury attorney would know every trick and how to encounter them. They will ensure that the company can’t trick or distress you into taking a small amount. Not only that, they are likely to get you more than what you expect. It is a part of their job to condescend the opposing party and force them into the settlement of your desire.

No Legal Issues
One wrong word can cost you the entire case. There are many trivial legal matters one has to take into account when dealing with an insurance company to get a settlement. An attorney will make sure you complete all legal requirements and don’t say anything you’re not supposed to. He will plan everything from the start and prepare you for the worst. He will be there to protect you from their tricks and stop you from getting overwhelmed.

Case May Go to Trial
Most injury cases are easily settled, but it doesn’t mean these cases never to go to trial. A layman tries his best to avoid a trial, especially when he doesn’t have a lawyer. The other party may take advantage of this fear and force you into agreeing to its terms. There won’t be such a case if you acquire the assistance of an injury lawyer in the beginning. The insurance company also wants to avoid trial and may offer a better settlement. If push comes to shove, you know you are more than ready to face trials with a professional lawyer by your side.

Save Your Time
You will find yourself surrounded by a lot of work when you file for a claim. You have a personal and professional life to maintain even with issues the accident may have caused. On top of that, having to deal with more paperwork and meetings could be too much for you. A personal injury lawyer will take care of everything giving you time for yourself and other matters.

Please also see:
Olympia Injury Lawyers

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July 23, 2019

My office or yours — the notary bar scene

Filed under: Humorous Posts — admin @ 4:50 am

I suggest against meeting Notaries in bars, and for simple reasons. Jeff once met a Notary at a bar, and the Notary took his interest the wrong way and asked, “My office or yours?” It’s easy for Notaries to get the wrong idea, especially if you meet them at the wrong place. That is why many people find Notaries using apps these days. You text them an offer, then they text you back hopefully within seconds and then you negotiate. My office or yours? That can affect the fee involved too.

But, if you meet a notary at their office, then they can’t ask, “My office or yours” since you are already at your office. Then, there are Notaries who like to wait for people at Starbucks. All I can say is, bring a good book, you’ll be reading it. Clients who go to Starbucks to get notarized typically keep the notary waiting around 25 to 45 minutes and you don’t get paid for that waiting time. If they pay in advanced by Paypal, you will at least get paid if they decide not to show up.

Another reason not to meet Notaries in bars is that they might do anything after they’ve had a few drinks. They might notarize an Affidavit without ID or spill tequila on your Warranty Deed after the Warranty has expired. So the moral of the story people is, if a Notary asks, “My office or yours,” You might consider shopping around for a more reliable sounding Notary, preferably not one whose prime was in the 70’s man!

You might also like:

A bar only for cool Notaries
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22546

Notary small talk at bars
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=21242

Bartender Notary – a reverse mortgage on the rocks
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=4080

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June 26, 2019

Spelling mistakes in blog comments and what Jeremy thinketh…

Filed under: Marketing Articles — admin @ 12:17 pm

You can always tell a notary. You see them at a bar and you know right away. They are always broke, always give themselves compliments, pats on the backs, try to appear to be a lot more than what they are, and then complain bitterly about how unfair the world is.

ME: How’s it going?

UNKNOWN PERSON: Oh okay. I worked so hard for the last seven years, and I’m a professional, and an expert in my field. I’m so much more knowledgeable than the other people in my industry. I have “x” amount of years of experience. But, I never seem to get paid on time.

WAITER: Here’s your bill.

UNKNOWN PERSON: $20 for two mocktails? I’m going to have to negotiate the bill. The menu said $7. I’m going to have a financial problem. Oh God.

ME: Have you considered supplementing your Notary work with some other specialties, and consider the idea of saving a particular percent of your income every month no matter what so that maybe one day you can retire without starving to death?

UNKNOWN PERSON: That’s a great idea but (pause… jaw drops) How did you know I was a Notary Public?

ME: You made it so obvious. You have all the tell-tale traits. Notaries brag all day long about how they are an expert at their field, complain how they never get paid, and yet when they perform an Acknowledgment, they don’t even know who is acknowledging what.

UNKNOWN PERSON: That’s a no-brainer, the Notary is acknowledging that the signature is genuine… duh…

ME: (oral buzzing sound) Wrong! Time to go back and restudy Notary Public 101 on our blog.

But, that is only the beginning. When you read Notary commentary on forums, blogs, and in their notes sections in their bio, there are normally plethoras of spelling mistakes, capitalization mistakes, punctuation mistakes (not to mention punctuality mistakes, but that’s a topic for another article). What do you think the readers think when you constantly write illiterate sounding English? They will think — if you are that sloppy in how you write, you will undoubtedly make endless mistakes facilitating the signing of our loans. This is why people generally micromanage you. It is not that they want to, they have to. Think about it.

You might also like:

What is so critical about crossing out he/she/they?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22223

Can a notary sign on a different day?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22084

Can a notary get in trouble?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=21429

Mistakes notaries make with title companies
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=4412

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November 20, 2018

123notary’s Index of Popular Notary Articles

I am not sure how this is going to go, because there are more than a thousand articles on our site. So, wish me luck and I hope this post is valuable.

COURSES
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20276
Beginner Notaries 103 Course – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=21112
Notary Etiquette 104 – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=21132

TECHNICAL POSTS
Journals — http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20272
Certificates — http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20268
Notary Acts — http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20280
General Notary Information — http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20264
Documents — http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20258
Law Suits & Legal Risks – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20478
Credible Witnesses – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20414
Index of posts about Power of Attorney – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20255

MARKETING
Notary Marketing 102 Course – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19774
Index of Marketing Posts – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20284
Snapdocs Compilation – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=21531
Phone Etiquette – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20505
Compilation of certification posts – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16264
10 rules for negotiating fees – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19620
How to write a notes section if you are a beginner – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16698

PUBLIC INTEREST
Find a Notary – http://blog.123notary.com/?tag=find-a-notary
Posts about fraud – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=21527

GUEST BLOGGERS
String of guest blogs – http://blog.123notary.com/?cat=230
Compilation of guest blogs – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22472

HUMOROUS & DRAMA POSTS
Best comedy articles 2010 to 2014 – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20288
Stories on the blog – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=21898
Posts about Notary & Politics – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20357
Compilation of mafia related posts – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20352
Best Virtual Comedy Posts to 2018 – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=17693
Notary Restaurant Post Compilation – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=17442
Notary Dating & Romance – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=17451
Compilation of Notary Sit-Com Episodes – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=15949

GENERAL
Best blog posts since 2010 – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=21650
Posts about 123notary – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20648

COMPREHENSIVE GUIDES
12 questions to ask for hospital notarizations – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20519
How to make more as a signing agent – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20418
Notary Public general info – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20075
How to negotiate signing fees like a pro! – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19198
When to refuse a notarization – a comprehensive guide – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=18974
10 things a notary can do to screw up a notarization – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=18864
A comprehensive guide to notary organizations – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=17088
A comprehensive guide to notary pricing – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16504
123notary’s comprehensive guide to getting reviews – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16290
Everything you need to know about writing a great notes section – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16074
10 tight points on loose certificates – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=15449
Notary journals from A to Z – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=8348
Notary Seal information from A to Z – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=8337
Signing Agent best practice 63 points – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=4315
Borrower Etiquette from A to Z – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=2995
Backdating from A to Z – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=2424
Mobile Offices from A to Z – http://blog.123notary.com/?p=535

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September 3, 2018

Opinions about Snapdocs in the forum & blog comments

Filed under: Signing Company Gossip — Tags: — admin @ 12:03 am

Here are some comments we got about Snapdocs in the blog and forum. I organized them in to positive and negative.

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POSITIVE

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1. Good information is kept in the database

Pam likes the fact that Snapdocs keeps quality information in their database about mileage, year to date payments, and a lot more. There is no doubt that Snapdocs has the most comprehensive computer database system for Notaries ever created.

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2. This Notary sets her fees and has no trouble.

A.C. Dye has never had a problem with Snapdocs other than a quick login issue.

.

3. Some Notaries happily get good service & jobs from this platform

Craig is happy with Snapdocs. He gets 33% of his work from them and would not trade them.

Bruce claims he has had only good service from Snapdocs and that Snapdocs does not set your fee. You can just hold out for jobs that meet your fee or specifications.

Cindy loves Snapdocs and has had no trouble. She counters bad offers with her fee and I’ll guess that she often gets it.

.

NEGATIVE

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1. You have to answer every text request or be penalized.

Debra is upset that she has to answer to all jobs otherwise she will be penalized by the algorithm. You lose points if you ignore requests and then you perhaps go down and down on the pecking order. It sounds like being handcuffed to the back of a train which is how my life has been running 123notary for the last few years.

.

2. You have to respond within seconds.

Linda claims that she responded to a text within one minute on at least 15 requests, however, never got a single job. Hmm. I never would have guessed. Glad I am writing this article. I am learning as much as you guys are.

Bob also is complaining that Snapdocs is a speed contest. You have to answer fast or you don’t get the job.

Dennis claims that the text blast demeans the profession and resembles a “feeding frenzy.”

Pam also says that you have to respond to texts within 20 seconds if you want to get hired. When they say jump, you say, “It’s more like diving for the phone, and how high?”

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3. Low-Ball Fees

Alfred feels that Notaries who have not calculated their after-expenses hourly rate might like to work for Snapdocs, but that he does not.

Lyle on the other hand says that initial offers are low-ball, but that he holds out and usually gets his fee.

Jeanne feels that Snapdocs offers insulting fees. She tries to negotiate, but it is hard when initial job specifications are not stated in their entirety.

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4. It’s hard or impossible for some Notaries to actually get work from them.

Sandy claims that she never got a signing from this platform. That is surprising.

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5. Data Entry Requirements

Lee says that there is a lot of information you have to input, and it seems to be far more than he enjoys inputting or downloading.

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6. Demeaning animal type treatment

I will refer again to Dennis’ comment above about how the Snapdocs job dispatch seems like a feeding frenzy that resembles the way animals are fed in a barn and the animals all swarm around the food troth. He is right. This is demeaning. But, high paying title companies are doing the same thing sending out emails to a dozen people for a job and seeing who answers first. I am also tired of sluggish Notaries, but requiring responses within seconds turns Notaries into the slaves of their mobile phones.

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7. Block Call List

Ken doesn’t work for cheap, and he blocked calls from SnapDocs. I’m surprised he was on their list to begin with.

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You might also like:

I’m a high end notary in a low-ball world
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22263

10 rules for negotiating notary fees
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19620

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July 9, 2018

How do you handle these phone situations?

Filed under: Etiquette — admin @ 9:43 am

.

Notary Situations

and how to handle them.
Notaries should know how to handle these situations, because you can lose clients very easily. Clients do not want to know about your problems or your family. They want you to get a job done professionally. Here are some scenarios Notaries typically screw up.

Screaming kids in the background
You might be used to your kids, but your clients do not want to hear them in the background. If your kids are screaming, train them to be very quiet when you answer the phone or leave the room if they can’t control themselves.

Relatives answering the phone
When you use the, “Hullo???” method of answering the phone, it is impossible to know if you are talking to the correct person. This is unprofessional and makes a horrible impression. Of the Notaries who have lasted on 123notary for ten or more years, very few say hello. The ones who say hello are not professional and generally do not last more than a few years. Everyone who answers your phone has to announce themselves, otherwise get a mobile phone that only you answer. If your three year old answer the phone, this is very unprofessional, however, if they say, “Rutherford residence, this is Brandon” then it becomes more tolerable.

Answering the phone with an alias
If you answer the phone, “Hi, this is Kathy” but your 123notary profile says Andrea and the person says, “May I speak to Andrea.” and you say, “This is her.” This creates a very annoying confusion. The point of having a name is so people know who you are and what to call you. If there are twelve people named John in one home room class at school it becomes confusing. And if you have multiple names that you go by that is confusing. Stick to one name or use an AKA when you answer the phone. “Hi, this is Kathy AKA Andrea.” That way no more confusion.

Answering the phone at a restaurant
If you answer the phone while at a noisy restaurant, it is best if you are able to step out within seconds of answering the call. The first thing you must do upon answering is say, “I am at a busy restaurant and I apologize for the noise. I can step out if you need to talk to me.” If you don’t keep in mind that nobody wants to hear the background noise and have you continually saying, “what, what what?” every time they ask you something, then be considerate and professional and either don’t answer the call, or step out quickly upon answering. Or text the caller and let them know your situation.

Having a bad phone
If you have a bad phone with bad reception, don’t keep making the other person repeat themselves and then yell at them telling them they are breaking up. That is unprofessional and rude. It is YOU that have the bad phone and it is YOU who is breaking up, not the caller. So, invest in a better phone with better reception otherwise you will lose a lot of clients and will have nobody to blame except yourself.

In a signing
Don’t answer the phone only to tell the other person you can’t talk. That is just plain rude. If you can’t talk, don’t answer. If you do answer, give the other party 90 seconds before you get short with them — hear them out, and be considerate. After the clock strikes a minute and a half, then let them ,know that you cannot talk any more because you are at a signing.

Between signings
If you just got out of a signing, are between signings or are on your way to a signing and refuse to talk to someone, that is rude. If you are at a signing, there is a reason not to talk long. But, if you are between signings and someone calls about business and you tell them you are busy — then, they will have to call you back, but they will reach you at another signing when they call back. If you are impossible about talking to people you will lose half your business.

.

You might also like:

Notary Marketing 102: Phone & Communication Etiquette
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19764

How do you negotiate fees correctly over the phone?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16757

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May 10, 2018

What has your experience with Snapdocs been like?

Filed under: Signing Company Gossip — Tags: — admin @ 12:25 am

Different Notaries have different experiences. I notice that some Notaries login to Snapdocs every day to gain high placement in the algorithm. Others do nothing but complain of low fees and bad offers. A few Notaries tend to negotiate higher fees and sometimes get away with it. One Notarycomplained that if he doesn’t answer texts right away, he doesn’t get any offers. But, now he says he doesn’t get any offers at all.

Snapdocs has a preference system. If you are the Notary picked, you get a text first and a few minutes to respond. If you don’t get back to them, they auto-text a handful of other nearby Notaries. The system makes sense, but the pay is still low.

So, what has YOUR experience been like with Snapdocs?

Also read:
Comments on our blog and forum about snapdocs
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=21299

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April 12, 2018

I’ve been doing this 20 years

Filed under: General Stories — admin @ 10:23 am

People who fail our test or who do not want to take our test hide behind their years. It is a cover up for lack of knowledge.

JEREMY: You failed my test!

NOTARY: Well sonny, I’ve been doing this for 20 years so I must know what I’m doing.

JEREMY: You don’t even know how to give an Oath or keep a journal. You not only do not know what you are doing, but you are endangering the public.

NOTARY: You’re mean!

JEREMY: You are worse than mean. You could get someone in financial or legal trouble from your ineptitude!

If you have been a Notary for 20 years, but only did one loan per year, that is 20 loans. That is why when I ask to know how many loans you have signed, I really don’t want to hear years. On the other hand, you could tell me number of loans and be mistaken or dishonest. On the other hand there are those who have signed ten thousand loans with their eyes virtually shut who don’t know their documents at all because they don’t read the documents and because the borrowers don’t ask questions that require the Notary to think.

That is why I think that a knowledge test is a better analytic than years, or number of loans. You can be in business for 20 years and know absolutely nothing. I’m not sure how that is possible, but I have many Notaries to prove that it is indeed possible. You can have signed 20,000 loans and know nothing. But, if you ace my test, you know something.

So, never tell people how many years you have been doing this. Hiring parties such as Title companies see right through this. It is BS. Tell them about the types of experience you have and be more specific. That will sound more knowledgeable to someone who has knowledge themself who is going to potentially hire you or list you on their directory.

.

You might also like:

How to negotiate signing fees like a pro
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19198

# of loans verses # of years
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19270

How many loans have you signed?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16559

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