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November 2, 2017

Some of you people have a few screws loose.

When I ask people questions to test their competency, it is remarkable how many people have screws loose.

Repeating
When I talk to my psychic, I talk to him for an hour every week or two. I do not ask him to repeat anything in an hour. When I talk to Carmen or Adine on the phone, I never have to have them repeat anything. It is remarkable how many of my clients have me repeat myself multiple times in a very short conversation. Do they not understand the confusing technical language I am using with terms like, “Venue, Notarial Act, Acknowledgment, Journal or Affiant?” If you don’t know Notary language, time to look up some terms in our glossary. That is your jour to know!

Scrambling
Normally when I ask people, “If you have TWO people each of whom is signing THREE notarized documents, how many journal entries should you fill out.” The Notary repeats back to me, “Okay, so you have THREE people each signing how many documents?” First of all, it is two people, how can you scramble that? Additionally, they are not signing three documents, they are signing three NOTARIZED documents. If the documents are not notarized documents, you don’t need to fill out any journal entries.

That would lead me to a great trick question — if you have two signers signing three documents, how many journal entries would you need to create? None! Because the documents were not designated to be notarized!

Changing the Scenario
When I ask, “If the ID says John Smith, but the name on the signature of the documetn says, John W Smith, without changing the scenario, can you notarize the signature?” Most people immediately say they would ask for another ID. But, asking for another ID is what I told you specifically not to do, namely, changing the scenario. I am trying to test your skills on saying yes or no to questions with limited parameters, not your skill at changing the question to a completely different quesiton that you prefer to answer. Answer questions as asked or you lose points. It is not rocket science — and the answer is NO. You are a Notary, yet the word you have the most trouble saying is, “NO.”

Talking endlessly
When I ask quick questions I have thousands of people to ask. If you talk endlessly and I have to ask you to stop talking, that is a huge headache for me. Just answer questions quickly without rambling and we can finish our quiz quickly.

Sluggish
Some people take forever to think of answer to questions. The most relentless question is when I ask people which Notary Acts are legal in their state. Most people have to think for a long time. You do Acknowledgements, Jurats and Oaths daily, why is it like rocket science for you to open your mouth and spit it out? Do you not know that those are considered official notarial acts in your state or in most states? A few states don’t have an official Jurat, but they have other acts similar to it such as Verification under Oath or Affidavits or Sworn Statements.

In short, the behavior of Notaries always seems somewhat mentally impaired. Less than 10% of Notaries on 123notary can just answer simple questions without asking me to repeat, scrambling information, changing the scenario, giving round about answers, rambling endlessly or taking a lot of my time. I just want to test your competency. I don’t have all day for nonsense. Try to discipline yourself to answer questions the way they were asked because the business world doesn’t have the patience for this type of nonsense. It is purely unprofessional.

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July 10, 2017

2020 – How the crash of the EU will affect the Notary Industry

Filed under: Marketing Articles,Popular on Linked In — admin @ 9:48 am

2020 — the year the world begins to see straight about finance.
Abraham Lincoln once said that a house divided cannot stand. A house divided cannot stand for long — this is a true fact. The EU has about 28 economies within it, many of which are heavily in debt. Greece, Portugal, Iceland, and a few other countries are in a permanent state of being near the brink of default. Germany has been giving Greece some subsistence support in exchange for a little “austerity” or financial responsibility on the part of the Greeks. The fact is that many of the socialist countries, particularly in the Mediterranean do not like the idea of being financially responsible. They want to have extravagant benefits, and pay more out than they take in. In the real world, governments that wish to stay in business need more revenues than they have expenses, and they need savings. The same applies to individuals.

The debt scenario is likely to put a handful of EU countries in default, I estimate by around 2020. The problem is that France, Italy, Iceland, Portugal, Greece, and Spain are all on the list of potential defaulters. Three of the countries on that list are large and owe more than a trillion per piece. This default will cause some sort of a chain reaction and affect the economies of other European countries and world financial markets. The problem for us, is that our careers are based on services for the financial market — namely notary services on loans.

If the EU crashes financially, that could mean several possibilities for the Notary industry.

1. Lower Interest Rates >> More Refinances
World financial organizations will STOP lending to governments since governments will be found to be so unstable. Currently, financial institutions still have tremendous faith in most governments, but that can come crashing down like dominos the minute countries start to default one after the other. Financial institutions will either not lend at all (their business model is based on lending) or will lend to shoe with collateral, namely, people with houses. With many world governments out of the picture as competitors for loans, interest rates could fall, making a lot more work for Refinances possible.

2. A Housing and Oil Crash
It is also possible that the financial panic that results from multiple defaulting nations could stimulate a crash in the housing market leaving home owners with insufficient equity to borrow money. This would result in a slow-down in the already slow Refinance market and could kill the Reverse Mortgage market. Additionally, a crash in financial markets in Europe could lead to a bad depression in Europe. That could lead to a higher dollar due to a lack of faith in European currencies, lower oil prices due to lower world demand, and lower oil prices relative to the dollar due to a higher dollar. It would not surprise me if in 2020, gasoline is sold for $1.20 per gallon. Cheap petroleum could also lead to a spike in US airline profits. I

3. Recession & Lower Interest Rates
However, the depression in Europe which is a market for US goods could cause an economic slowdown in the USA. If there is a slowdown then businesses will not be borrowing as much money for expansion which means that home owners will have lower interest rates which means more Refinances.

What does Jeremy think?
I am not a psychic, although I use my psychic skills on the stock market and my accuracy has been aroun 57% if I meditate before I make predictions. 57% is great because that means I’m right almost 6 times for every 4 times I’m wrong which is good enough for regular profits.

A housing crash, low interest rates and a refusal to lend.
I believe that there will be a housing crash as a result of European financial crashes around 2019, 2020, or 2021. I cannot predict the exact year as each event hinges on another event preceding it causing a domino effect. I also believe there will lower interest rates combined with a paranoia of lending money to anyone. The paranoia that banks had from 2009 until the present about loaning to home owners will continue. Anyone without perfect credit or a high down payment or high equity will probably be denied a loan. Banks will be super picky about who they lend to. Gold could fluctuate quite a bit as people desperate for cash sell their gold and investors paranoid about security buy more gold.

1. Low Interest Rates >> A spike in Refinances to well qualified home owners
2. A Housing Crash >> A downturn in Reverse Mortgages due to low equity in homes after Real Estate downturn.
3. Low oil prices
4. Fluctuating gold prices that end up being higher than $2400 per ounce after 2022.
5. Debt ridden Mediterranean countries will default on loans one after the next. Other more stable governments will crash starting around 2025-ish too like Germany, Japan and possibly the USA (let’s hope not.)

Summary
My worst fear is an government financial collapse in the United States. That means your social security check will not come, you might not be able to retire, and all types of economic instability could come. This reality is the result of years of irresponsible financial behavior. If even half of the governments of the world would save instead of being permanently in debt, this global domino effect of government collapses wouldn’t be possible.. Hopefully humans will learn that usury is not a sin because some old guy with a beard who lived 4000 years ago said it is, but because out of control usury causes economic slavery, governmental dependency on other countries, as well as global economic crashes which ruin so many people’s lives. And as far as Notaries are concerned, the future of signing agent work from 2019 to 2030 is very shaky and uncertain. It might be more, less or about the same volume of work.

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April 13, 2013

FAQ: How much do notaries charge?

FAQ: How much do notaries charge?

How much does a notary cost?
Notary fees vary from state to state. Please visit our Find a Notary page and look up by state, and we have pricing information for most states.

How much can a notary charge?
A notary can charge as much as his/her state of commission allows them to charge.

How much do notaries cost?
You can not buy a notary, so a notary doesn’t have a cost. But, they charge fees for doing notary acts (notarizing). Each notary act has a separate fee, and fees vary from state to state. Visit our Find a Notary page and click on the name of your state for more information.

How much is a notary?
Once again, you can not purchase a notary. But, you can purchase the services of a Public Notary. Please visit our Find a Notary Public page for more state specific information about notary fees in your state.

How much can you charge for a notary?
A notary can charge as much as his/her state of commission allows them to charge for notarizing signatures.

Here are some typical notary questions written in poor grammar:

“How much does notary cost?”
“How much do notary cost?”

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December 16, 2011

Notary FAQ based on recent search queries

Here are some interesting and random FAQ type questions based on search queries made to our blog.
 
Q. How do I know if the notary can be trusted?
A. Notaries are screened by their respective states.  Screening in California is more rigorous and involved live scan fingerprints, and checks with the FBI and DOJ, while many states are more lackidasical. Some notaries are crooked in what they do, but I have never heard of a notary engaging in an act of fraud against their client.  Keep in mind that notaries do not keep possession of documents that they notarize, so after a client is gone, there is not much fraud that they could engage in against a client.  More common frauds involve helping a client falsify a date on a document or notary certificate.  A less common but very serious fraudulent act might include notarizing a forged signature on a deed effecting real property.  If you are so paranoid, what do you think this notary is going to do to you?
 
Carelessness and incompetence is 50x as likely to harm you than fraud
The real danger with notaries is more likely to do with carelessness and poor training more than issues to deal with trust.  More than 50% of notaries just simply don’t know what they are doing  and don’t know their state notary laws well enough to handle even the simplest types of notarizations.
 
If you want to check up on a notary, you can ask them for references and try to find out how much notary work they do, which is still not much of an indication of competency.  Also, check the notary’s ID to make sure they are the same person whose name is on the notary seal!
 
Q. Can I make a living being a notary?
A. Being a notary is at best a part time activity which you squeeze in to all of the other things which you are hopefully busy doing.  A store owner can notarize for clients, as can a real estate broker.  Mobile notaries go and do loan signings, but usually have other on call jobs (or full time day jobs) that they do.
 
Q. Can you amend a notarized document after it has been notarized.
A.  I have three answers for this question:  (1) No (2) Never (3) No way, buddy.  If you need to change or amend the document, then draft it how you want it, sign it, and have it notarized all over again. Yes, that will cost you more, but that is the only legal way to do what you want to do.
 
Q.  How do you know if someone is a fake notary?
A.  Check their identification to see if it matches the name on the notary seal.  It is a common fraud for people in offices to illegally “borrow” their colleagues notary seal. Usually they do this to save time, and no harm is mean, but they could go to jail for this as it is illegal!   Also, make sure their notary seal hasn’t expired.  If you really think that the notary is fake, then contact the Secretary of State’s (Department of State, Secretary of Commonwealth) Notary Division and ask if that “fake notary” is a real notary!

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