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February 21, 2019

How many years is a Notary commission good for?

How long does a notary commission last? How many years is my notary commission good for? How many years is my term of office as a notary public?

The answer is that it varies from state to state.

An Alabama Notary commission is good for 4 years

An Arizona notary commission is good for 4 years

Arkansas notaries are commissioned for 10 years.
A California notary commission is good for 4 years.

A Colorado Notary commission is good for 4 years
A Florida notary commission is good for 4 years
An Illinois notary commission is good for 4 years

Louisiana notaries are commissioned for life and have the hardest training program of any state.

A New Jersey Notary Commission is good for 5 years
A Pennsylvania notary commission is good for 4 years
A Texas notary commission is good for 4 years
A Washington state notary commission is good for 4 years

But, some states have an unusually short term of office for notaries like Delaware which is only a 2 year term of office.

Some states have a short term of office, while others have a longer one.
The majority of states have a four year term, but a few have a five, six, seven, or even longer term.

Our forum article below covers even more states and their lengths of notary terms of office.
http://www.123notary.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=3955

Penalties for notary misconduct, fraud and failure of duty
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=21315

How much does a Notary cost in 2019?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=21308

Notary Public general information
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20075

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October 4, 2018

Giving notary commissions to seven year olds

Filed under: General Stories — admin @ 10:18 am

Can you imagine giving a notary commission to a seven year old? What do they know about notary law or procedure. The sad truth is that with a little training, a child could out do most adults at Notary work.

The other day, I made twenty phone calls and wrote down the results. I asked people to pretend I was their customer and administer an Oath to me for a document that said I lived in Delaware. Only one of twenty knew how to do their job. How can a Notary division commission people none of whom know how to do their job? It is as foolish as commissioning a seven year old. The child might not be responsible, but at least they are at the age where they know they have to learn things and they are curious about the world.

Adults don’t always crave knowledge and are not always disciplined about learning. I will have to contact the secretary of state’s in the various states because my career is suffering because it is too hard to find passable notaries.

And then the NNA comes along and teaches signing agent knowledge to notaries who don’t know how to be notaries. How can the NNA commission people as signing agents who can’t even administer an Oath? In my opinion you should know Notary work first, and THEN, learn signing agent stuff. You learn to crawl before you walk. You learn to put the key in the ignition before you do speed racing at the Indy 500. The NNA has real pull. People respect them and treat them almost as a government agency which they are not. If the NNA says you have to learn to be a real Notary, people will listen. Maybe it’s about time the NNA says — without notary knowledge, no certification of any type for you buddy! I am waiting for that day to come. Since they read our blog at the NNA (to make sure I’m not saying anything about them) perhaps they will get the message! I believe that if the NNA changed their policy, this problem of Notaries who don’t know how to be Notaries would decrease at least in our industry although the bank notaries would still not know their job.

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October 7, 2016

Notary Funeral — When the Commission Expired

Filed under: Andy Cowan — Tags: , — admin @ 12:03 pm

NOTARY FUNERAL – WHEN THE COMMISSION EXPIRED

We’re gathered here today to celebrate the life and times of a man who made the world a better place. Since he’s no longer here, I don’t have to swear to that. He first knew he wanted to make a mark on the world when he asked to witness others making marks on pieces of paper. Other kids learned the three Rs. Our friend who we miss so learned the three-kinda-looks-like-Rs-but-better-make-sure-they’re-legible-before-he-definitely-calls-them-Rs. He was accepted as a Navy Seal, but chose to join the Notary Seals. His most dangerous mission – asking for Edward Scissorhands’ signature. He switched from pre-med to pre-notary in college, because he wanted to witness legible handwriting instead of his own horrendous handwriting had he stayed a doctor.

He was a good man who never backdated. He met his dear wife on the notary dating site, affiant.com. His wife tried to get his death certificate notarized, not realizing you can’t notarize vital records. We don’t measure his life in years, but the number of commissions he held, ever since he was of legal age. He signed, sealed, and now he shall be delivered.

Instead of being cremated, he requested to be shredded.

In lieu of flowers, his family requests pens. He never had enough pens.

You might also like:

Notary Hell — Yeah, but it’s a dry heat
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=13196

Witnessing intake forms for Notary heaven
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=8832

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April 3, 2013

How many years is a notary commission good for?

How long does a notary commission last? How many years is my notary commission good for? How many years is my term of office as a notary public?

The answer is that it varies from state to state.

An Arizona notary commission is good for 4 years
A California notary commission is good for 4 years.
A Florida notary commission is good for 4 years
An Illinois notary commission is good for 4 years
A Pennsylvania notary commission is good for 4 years
A Texas notary commission is good for 4 years
A Washington state notary commission is good for 4 years

But, some states have an unusually short term of office for notaries like Delaware which is only a 2 year term of office.

Arkansas notaries are commissioned for 10 years.
Louisiana notaries are commissioned for life and have the hardest training program of any state.
Some states have a short term of office, while others have a longer one.
The majority of states have a four year term, but a few have a five, six, seven, or even longer term.

Our forum article below covers even more states and their lengths of notary terms of office.

You might also like:

How long is a notary term of office? (more states covered)
http://www.123notary.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=3955

Random yet interesting notary facts — did you know?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=2818

Interesting and uncommon notary acts
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=483

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October 1, 2012

New Jersey Commissioner of Deeds – Information

New Jersey Commissioner of Deeds – Information and History

The title of Commissioner of Deeds was established in the 19th century because only a judge could acknowledge an out-of-state deed, and it was difficult to find a judge to acknowledge a deed for a property located outside of the state. At this time, property deeds could be acknowledged only by a notary belonging to a particular state, New Jersey, for example, and a deed for a property from another state could not be acknowledged by a notary from New Jersey. The office of Commissioner of Deeds might thus be seen as a higher rank than a notary.  When states came to accept the acts of notaries from other states, the office of Commissioner of Deeds was no longer needed.
 
In New Jersey, the person is sometimes called a Foreign Commissioner of Deeds because he could acknowledge even deeds to property outside of the U.S.  These days, the Department of State strongly suggests that Secretaries of State not appoint commissioners of deeds to perform acts in a foreign country until it is made clear, with the Department’s help, that the foreign government would not object. In other words, the office of Commissioner of Deeds is outmoded.  There is no evidence that the State of New Jersey is still appointing Commissioners of Deeds, and no information on how to apply for such a position; the neighboring State of New York is no longer appointing such Commissioners.

Please see our New Jersey Notary Public Search Results!

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April 11, 2012

New Hampshire Commissioner of Deeds Information

New Hampshire Commissioner of Deeds Information

The State of New Hampshire, a congenial state, still appoints Commissioners of Deeds for a fee of $75 for a 5-year commission.  The application can be done online and is submitted to the Governor and Executive Council.  In 4-6 weeks, you will recieve your appointment and will need to sign and take your oath before a judge, who will then sign your commission.  When your oath is returned and filed, you will be able to act as a Commissioner of Deeds.  In other words, you will have the right to:

  • administer oaths in New Hampshire and elsewhere for documents to be used in New Hampshire
  • take depositions and affidavits
  • take acknowledgments on deeds and instruments

It is recommended that you use an official seal, even though New Hampshire state law does not require it.   The Commisioner of Deeds may charge a fee of $10 for each witness, oath, or certifications, and may charge between $5 and $50 for depositions.  The general requirement is that you be a resident of the State of New Hampshire; no minimum age is given, but it is assumed to be at least 18, as for a notary.  The Secretary of State website information is clear and simple, and also includes an online handbook–at least for Notaries.

Please visit our New Hampshire Notary Public Search Results!

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What is a Magistrate?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=1887

What is a Justice of the Peace?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=103

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January 2, 2011

Commission Impossible…

COMMISSION IMPOSSIBLE

Your commission, should you choose to accept it, is for an impossible mission that few notaries’ businesses live to tell about… The ones not worth commissioning…

Look out! The signer isn’t present! Right behind you! That document is incomplete! Not a good sign – The signer is the notary’s spouse! Watch out! The signer can’t produce acceptable identification! If their driver’s license picture is Waldo of “Where’s Waldo” fame, beware! Whether you can spot him in a crowd, or not, Waldo doesn’t really exist! Danger! The notary has a financial interest in the transaction! In that case, your interest must be in finding a commission impossible!

Oh no! The document doesn’t have a prepared notary certificate! Prepare yourself for disaster or no commission, whichever comes first! Danger! The notary thinks the signer is being coerced to sign! Coerce yourself out of that situation! What’s that, you say? The notary suspects the transaction is fake or deceptive? That’s as conducive to landing a commission as landing a punch in a fake wrestling match!

Look out!! The signer can’t pay the notary’s fee? Commission impossible! The signer’s a minor? Commission impossible! The signer seems drunk? Face this sober fact – Commission impossible!!

Don’t let the signer intimidate you into notarizing when the law prohibits it! If you use good judgment, you’ll get the commission the right way. Oh, and since this is “Commission Impossible,” at the end you’ll also get the girl, even if you’re not Tom Cruise. If you’re a female notary, you’ll get the guy. Even if he’s not Tom Cruise!

You might also like:

Deceptive fax backs: the good old bait and switch tactic
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=14040

Deceptive identities — companies that change their names
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=1090

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July 27, 2019

Texas suspends notary who handle Stormy’s hush money

Filed under: Notary Mistakes — admin @ 2:11 am

Stormy Daniels signed a document regarding being paid $130,000 in hush money before the 2016 election. A Texas Notary named Erica Jackson notarized that non-disclosure agreement document concerning the money. But, the State of Texas terminated her Notary commission as a result. The Notary claims she did nothing wrong, yet got canned anyway?

However, the plot thickens. After I watched a video about what had happened, there was a stamp on the signature page, but no notarial certificate verbiage and no notary signature. The notary claimed that the Acknowledgment page which was the third page (that was no longer attached) that stated who was being notarized, etc., was omitted.

Additionally, there was an accusation that the Notary notarized without a signature of the Notary, but the Notary claims that she signed on other pages which were attached.

There was also journal record for the corresponding document, and the journal seemed to have been filled out correctly.

Jeremy’s Comments
If you are a Notary Public, it is quite likely that you could end up on the 6pm national news. So please take your job a little more seriously and get rid of this “I already know it all” attitude, as it is that attitude which prevents you from learning.

This Notary did several things wrong.
1. She stamped the signature page with her Notary seal but omitted Acknowledgment and/or Jurat certificate verbiage. She also omitted a Notary signature to accompany her notary seal which is illegal and she should be terminated if that was the case. It is hard to see what actually happened when you have an inconclusive video.

2. She attached a certificate that was to constitute page three, but that page three ended up missing. Your stamp can not be on page two when the certificate wording is on page three. Those legally have to be on the same page. If the stamp had been on page three where it was supposed to be, she wouldn’t be in a world of trouble.

3. I originally thought (because I prejudged the situation) that the Notary was in trouble because of her association with some dirty business. That was how her improper notarization was discovered, but not why she got in trouble. Interesting in any case.

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July 20, 2019

Father and daughter notary event

Filed under: Humorous Posts — admin @ 4:42 am

In another article I wrote about a father and daughter notary team. But, what about a father and daughter notary event? What would the activities be?

ANNOUNCER: Now, it is time for the embossing contest. Which team can emboss the most amount of pages in living wills?

GIRL: Don’t those have about 60 pages per document?

ANNOUNCER: Yes!

GIRL: I’ll try and I hope I LIVE through it otherwise I will need a living will.

ANNOUNCER: Actually then you will need a dying will.

GIRL: Oh, I’m dying to get one of those.

FATHER: Honey, I don’t think you need one of those quite yet. You just turned 18 and are only on your first commission. You won’t expire yet unless you get hit by a truck on the way to an Affidavit signing. Hey, it happens. That is why I got you a car with airbags.

GIRL: Isn’t my father great?

ANNOUNCER: Now it is time for the refill the notary stamp with ink competition. Ready, set, ink up!

GIRL: This competition is so messy. I wish I could skip it but it is such good practice. I might need to do this in real life.

FATHER: Might? You need to do it every year if you stay busy.

GIRL: I’ll stay busy. I’m on the database for 200 low-balling signing companies. If my price is low enough, they will work me into the ground and then not pay me.

FATHER: Sounds like a good long term plan… not! Make sure they pay you before you do anything more for them.

ANNOUNCER: Now it is time for the jump on the notary stamp contents. You make a giant stamp in this twenty foot long piece of paper.

FATHER: I’m so out of shape. I really need to get to the gym more.

ANNOUNCER: This is just like a gym and will get you in shape. Do jump to stamp daily and you will lose a pound a week.

GIRL: Okay, I’m jumping… how was that stamp? Oops, I bet the county recorder won’t like that one. I hate having to stand on this giant stamp.

ANNOUNCER: And the winner of the day is Jack Stampman… great name for a Notary by the way.

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July 17, 2019

Notary fortune cookie

Filed under: Humorous Posts — admin @ 4:35 am

I can imagine if there were a Chinese restaurant run by a Notary, in addition to having a lot of dishes with squid ink, there could be interesting messages in fortune cookies.

“Don’t quit business over stolen FedEx.”

That one is good. I had a client whose FedEx package got stolen. She wanted to quit, but I told her that stuff happens and you have to keep on keeping on.

“He who notarize without proper ID not have commission long.”

I know I know… just ask for another ID.

“Do not backdate unless have good time machine.”

Don’t try that one at home.

“Chinese philosophers need Notary too: Confucious, Mencious and Facetious. That last philosopher doesn’t exist in real life — I was just being facetious.”

“You will inherit many customer soon after you upgrade advertising.”

“Your dual tray printer will have long life — but, still invest in good warranty just in case.”

“Chinese notary tip – Notarize for your girlfriend so you can see her ID and find out her real age.”

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