You searched for banking - Notary Blog - Signing Tips, Marketing Tips, General Notary Advice - 123notary.com
123Notary

Notary Blog – Signing Tips, Marketing Tips, General Notary Advice – 123notary.com Control Panel

May 10, 2019

Lessons Learned from 10+ Years in Investment Banking and How I Used That to Start My Notary Services Business

Filed under: Other Guest Bloggers — admin @ 9:25 pm

Lessons Learned from 10+ Years in Investment Banking and How I Used That to Start My Notary Services Business.

Working at a prestigious investment bank in the mortgage sector seemed to be the role that I would continue with until retirement. That’s the way it was in that industry, each role was extremely competitive and once you finally received a full-time job at a well- known firm, it all seemed to be smooth sailing after that. We had used mobile notaries all of the time at my role with the bank and it never even crossed my mind that I’d end up running my own business in this space.

After 12 years with the bank, I felt that I had accomplished all that I had wanted to and that it was time for a new challenge. It wasn’t until I had my own bad experience with a mobile notary that I realized that I can definitely improve upon that and that no customer should feel that rushed/stressed out in an already difficult situation. After completing a refinance on my home, we had a notary come to help with the closing documents. The best ways to describe the experience would be disorganized, rushed, and overall just frustrating. That was when it clicked – I’ve seen this before time and time again from other mobile notaries.

I did the research and learned exactly what I would need to do to start my own business and obtain the proper licensing in the notary services field. It wasn’t easy to leave such a safe job and at such a prestigious firm, but I knew I could greatly add value to the customers I would work with and I would guarantee that none of my notary services clients would ever get that awful experience I had seen time and time again.

What are some of the main lessons that I took away and have helped me continue to grow my mobile notary firm here in the Phoenix, AZ area? First of all, I saw the stress and the anxiety that went into the moments that mobile notaries were needed. These major milestones should not be treated lightly. When done correctly and when treating clients with patience and the respect that they deserve, it’s an amazing experience to be a part of putting their minds at ease. To be a part of that excitement when someone purchases their first home and need to finalize all of the documents to the difficult times when someone needs to notarize a medical power of attorney for a loved one. It is our responsibility to be professional and caring. I see this as the most important principle, and this is what continues to lead my business to be able to help add value in more people’s lives.

Secondly, I saw the importance of being precise and timely in the notary services field.
The difference between a successful and unsuccessful house closing or refinancing can come down to issues with the paperwork at the last minute. It is a notary’s key role to be able to prevent fraud and other issues that may come up as an added layer of security for both parties involved in a transaction. In a world where scammers and fraud run rampant, adding in an unbiased third party can be a huge value add to the whole process of various legal documentation signings.

Finally, and this lesson learned applied to every job and role that I’ve had at various companies – go above and beyond for your clients or your colleagues and you will see that level of trust and respect pay off throughout your career. One of the main reasons why I run my business with the flexibility to work on weekends and other hours that the competition will not is that I know that unexpected issues always come up and it’s my duty to be there for my clients when they need me. It’s not uncommon to have to drop everything I’m working on and rush over to help a client out with their loan signing needs, as they’ve come to expect that level of service from my business.

Although it was intimidating at first and doubts came up, leaving the investment banking world behind was one of the best decisions that I’ve made in my life. Instead of being bound by processes and procedures, I now have the flexibility and freedom to run my business the way that I know offers the most value to my clients. Leveraging the 12+ years of experiencing in the mortgage field really helped me see the huge opportunity that there was in the notary services space and I’m excited to continue to grow my business and help those in the Phoenix area.

Shannon Winter is the Owner of Shannon’s Notary Services
(https://shannonsnotaryservices.comhttps://shannonsnotaryservices.comhttps://shannonsnotaryservices.com/) and helps clients in the Phoenix metro area with all of their loan signing needs.

You might also like:

Forex investment tricks for Notaries
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22807

Do you invest in your notary business?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22129

Share
>

December 10, 2018

Banking Power of Attorney Form

Filed under: Power of Attorney — Tags: , — admin @ 9:57 am

Please be advised that you should consult an Attorney and your bank before attempting to get a Banking Power of Attorney Form drafted or notarized. Many banks have their own form and require the use of their own form. If you do not comply with all of the regulations of your bank, you may find that your power of attorney is rendered powerless and is reduced to being just a piece of paper. Also be advised that the powers granted to the Attorney in Fact may be limited and may or may not include online banking or other privileges.

How do I get a banking power of attorney notarized?
Just find a Notary on 123notary, and they can come to your home, office, jail cell or hospital to get your power of attorney notarized. They will charge you a mobile fee as well. Please make sure the signer has a valid and current government issued photo identification card.

Where can I get a banking power of attorney notarized?
You can also go to your local bank to get your banking power of attorney notarized.

Can the Notary explain the banking power of attorney to me?
Notaries may not draft or explain legal documents unless they are specifically authorized to do so by also being an Attorney or perhaps in a legal profession that authorizes them to do so. Please ask an Attorney all your questions and just have the Notary notarize.

You might also like:

Bank of America Power of Attorney Form
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=21327

How do you get a Power of Attorney Document?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20785

Index of Posts about Power of Attorney
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20255

The Power of Attorney was rejected by a bank
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=6368

Wells Fargo Power of Attorney Form
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22125

Share
>

April 24, 2019

Notaries can get jobs in banks more easily

Filed under: Public Interest — admin @ 10:22 am

If you would like to have more options to work in a bank in any particular capacity, it is easier to get a job at a bank if you are a commissioned Notary Public. Being a Notary Public involves applying to your particular state, in many cases taking a course and passing a test. The rules for becoming a Notary are state specific and change over time so please ask your state or visit your state’s Notary Public information online which generally is on the Secretary of State’s website.

There are lots of documents that might get notarized at a bank. Sometimes banking power of attorney forms need to be notarized. Other times, contracts, affidavits, or other general documents might need to be signed and notarized. Loan documents might need to be signed at a bank and those include Deeds of Trust, Mortgages, Signature Affidavits and many others. It is good to be knowledgeable about the loan signing process if you get involved in loan signing.

It is likely that a bank might want to have multiple Notaries on staff. After all, people call in sick, quit, and take lunch breaks, but the Notary work still must get done.

So, consider becoming a Notary so you can get that bank job you have always dreamed of. And yes, I would like my withdrawal in ones please…

You might also like:

Bank of America Power of Attorney Form
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=21327

Banks need more notaries on staff
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=21153

Share
>

April 1, 2019

Why Is It Worthwhile to Notarize a Will?

Filed under: Other Guest Bloggers — Tags: — admin @ 8:16 am

Why Is It Worthwhile to Notarize a Will?
Notarization is also known as notarial acts. This is a three party process conducted by a notary public which includes record keeping, vetting and certifying. This is the official procedure taken to prevent fraud and also assure parties in the transaction that the document, in this case, the will being notarized is authentic. Not only the will but banking transactions documents should be notarized too.

By signing a will, one specifies how they want their property distributed after their death. This process is called probate. Whereas some states do not necessarily require notarization of wills, notarizing a will might speed up the probate speed. The question you and I might be having is, why is it worthwhile to notarize a will? Let us explore.

In most countries, a notary is carried out by a notary public who in this case acts as an eyewitness in discharging restrictive fraud activities connected to your will. There is also an act that governs such duties. He can direct oaths and witness swearing by deponents for affidavits. It is also believed that a notary can also act as an arbitrator.

Who Is Supposed To Notarize?
Notarization can be conducted by a practicing lawyer who has experience of at least 7 to 10 years. Also, an individual who has served as a judicial service member or has served under central or state government and whose position required specialized knowledge of the law is also qualified to become a notary.

Benefits of Notarizing a Will
Prevents future frauds and identity theft
George Sink urges that a notarized will help to verify that you are the one signing your will. This will help you, the owner from future frauds or identity theft in such a way that no one else can present or produce a forged will.

Notarizing your will prevents the owner from unpredictable fraud cases. This is because regardless of what the other party produces, your notarized will affirms you as the sole owner and that, can never be challenged.

Notarizing your will furthermore affirm to the fact that all the signatories are real and authentic. It also shows that genuine people signed them and that the will itself is not fabricated.

Helps Protect the rights of the will
A notarized will which has been fully certified by a notary public also aids in protecting the rights of the will. Furthermore, to avoid further and possible court proceedings, it is rather advisable for individuals to notarize their will.

Prevent court rejections
In some cases, notarizing a will is mandatory. Some lawyers argue that if you do not notarize your will, its validity in future might be questioned which might even lead to court rejections, in case there is a case and your will has to be produced. To avoid all this unfolding saga, it is advisable to notarize wills early enough.

The signatories do not necessarily have to testify in court
Another reason why notarizing your will is worthwhile is the fact that the signatories do not necessarily have to testify in court to authenticate their signatures. This saves a lot of money and time from both parties. Notarizing your will, therefore, serve as an enormous strategic advantage in the lawsuit.

Conclusion
We have discussed throughout the article what notarization is, who executes it and why is it a suitable procedure. All we can say is that notarizing your will is just a formality that should be implemented when signing your will. A notarized will assures the legal authenticity of an individual’s signature and identity whereas without doing so, a person cannot claim ownership of that particular will; therefore, notarization of a will is crucial.

Share
>

March 30, 2019

Jersey Shores Notary

Filed under: Sit-Coms — Tags: , — admin @ 10:27 am

A Notary was asked to notarize on camera in Jersey Shores. One of the girls decided to get a Notary Tattoo on her rear end, and wanted to have it notarized. So after a one hour drive in traffic, the Notary finally got to the set. The girl showed the Notary her tattoo of a Notary seal. The Notary said that he could not notarize a tattoo, but only a signature.

So, the girl had to call the tattoo artist and have a signature tattooed once again on her rear end. But, the Notary said, “Stop, you need the signature to be on a document.” So, the girl said, “No problem, I’ll have him create a document on my rear end.”

This girl’s rear end wasn’t big enough for much of a document. Perhaps one of those banking power of attorney documents because those are on card stock and smaller. But, not a full size document, and definitely not a legal document.

GIRL: Don’t worry, there’s nothing legal about my tush.

NOTARY: Alright already. Let’s get on with this. So, what am I doing?

GIRL: You’re going to notarize my tattoo.

NOTARY: I can notarize a statement about your tattoo, but not the tattoo.

GIRL: God, you’re just like all the other Notaries.

NOTARY: Yeah, that’s because we are governed by the same laws. Maybe you should find a notary who doesn’t follow the law.

GIRL: But, wouldn’t that be (pause) illegal?

NOTARY: Duh!!! But, since you have a notary seal on your tuchus, why not notarize something yourself using that seal.

GIRL: Now you’re talking!

So, another afternoon at Jersey Shores takes place. Luckily for the Notary, the girl was not the one responsible for paying him. He got cash from a director, and was off on his way.

You might also like:

Notary Housewives
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=14721

Donnie Wahlberg and the notary
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22199

Share
>

March 16, 2019

Wells Fargo Power of Attorney Form

Filed under: Power of Attorney — Tags: — admin @ 9:59 am

Please be informed that banking power of attorneys are complicated and have issues. For an accurate opinion or accurate guidance, you need to consult Wells Fargo as well as an Attorney.

Attorneys typically can draft up fancy Power of Attorney documents, often at great expense. Their guidance is irreplaceable. However, banks typically have their own Power of Attorney forms and require the use of their forms.

Additionally it is possible that Wells Fargo might have its own rules for who can be an agent in a Power of Attorney, and also might restrict the rights and privileges of the person who is the Attorney in Fact. I read online that you cannot use online banking if you are an Attorney in Fact for a Wells Fargo Power of Attorney Form. However, I cannot vouch for the truthfulness of that statement as it might be outdated or false.

Banks will want to see the Power of Attorney and identification before allowing the Attorney in Fact (grantee or agent) the right to access an individual’s account.

How do I get a Wells Fargo Power of Attorney Form?
Once again, please contact Wells Fargo customer service.

.

Other Links:

Legal Zoom Banking Power of Attorney Information
https://info.legalzoom.com/gain-access-bank-accounts-power-attorney-25538.html

Finding out your Power of Attorney is powerless — NY Times Article
https://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/10/health/finding-out-your-power-of-attorney-is-powerless.html

How do you get a Power of Attorney document?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20785
Power of Attorney (string of blog entries)
http://blog.123notary.com/?tag=power-of-attorney

Share
>

March 1, 2019

A Notary can get a job in a bank more easily

Filed under: Humorous Posts — admin @ 7:34 am

If you are a Notary Public and want to get a job, sometimes it is easier to get a job at a bank, insurance agency or Real Estate office. Or , if you already have experience working for these types of offices and want to apply for a new job and have an edge, it might be helpful to become a Notary.

It is far easier to get a job in a bank if you are a Notary Public. Of course you need to have other skills to make hiring you viable. To become a Notary, just contact your state notary division. Commissioning requirements are different in each state, but generally easy unless you live in California where you have to pass a difficult test.

As a Notary in a bank, you will be notarizing mainly for customers, occasionally for staff members, but you can also freelance off hours. If your boss wants to see your journal, he has the right to request seeing a particular journal entry, and he can see it in your presence. Don’t hand over your seal and journal to your boss for him to walk off with – that might be considered a crime!

Being a Notary makes it easier to get a job in general, and you can also use your commission to freelance during nights and weekends. Many Notaries make a comfortable supplement to their living doing loan signings at night.

You might also like:

Does Real Estate experience help as a Notary?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=4563

Banking power of attorney form
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=21338

Share
>

October 11, 2018

84% of Notaries are women? Oh, man…

Filed under: General Stories — admin @ 12:44 am

I am not sure if I believe this number, because women might be more likely to respond to a poll. However, according to poll documented in the NNA blog, 84% of Notaries responding to poll questions were women. Hmm.

https://www.nationalnotary.org/notary-bulletin/blog/2017/10/who-are-americas-notaries

This article also pegs the US Notary population at about 4.4 million which is an interesting figure especially when you account for the low birth rate of Notaries which could contribute to a shortage of Notaries in future generations.

Florida incidentally has roughly half a million Notaries, which is the highest of any state, and likely to be the highest per capita. However, these Florida Notaries typically do poorly on Jeremy’s over the phone quiz which leads me to believe that perhaps they should have fewer Notaries, but better Notaries.

The industries with the most Notaries include Real Estate, Legal , and Healthcare with banking, corporate and education as well.

It is interesting to see who are America’s Notaries. And based on this poll, I now see why the line for the men’s bathroom at Notary conventions is so short.

.

You might also like:

Notary housewives
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=14721

Notaries without makeup
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=15405

10 ways female notaries can protect themselves
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19196

Lady Notaries need to show caution
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=17469

Share
>

September 2, 2018

Bank of America Power of Attorney Form

Please be informed that banking power of attorneys are complicated and have issues. For an accurate opinion or accurate guidance, you need to consult Bank of America as well as an Attorney.

Attorneys typically can draft up fancy Power of Attorney documents, often at great expense. Their guidance is irreplaceable. However, banks typically have their own Power of Attorney forms and require the use of their forms.

Additionally it is possible that Bank of America might have its own rules for who can be an agent in a Power of Attorney, and also might restrict the rights and privileges of the person who is the Attorney in Fact. I read online that you cannot use online banking if you are an Attorney in Fact for a Bank of America Power of Attorney Form. However, I cannot vouch for the truthfulness of that statement as it might be outdated or false.

Banks will want to see the Power of Attorney and identification before allowing the Attorney in Fact (grantee or agent) the right to access an individual’s account.

How do I get a Bank of America Power of Attorney Form?
Once again, please contact Bank of America customer service.

.

Other Links:

Legal Zoom Banking Power of Attorney Information
https://info.legalzoom.com/gain-access-bank-accounts-power-attorney-25538.html

Finding out your Power of Attorney is powerless NY Times
https://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/10/health/finding-out-your-power-of-attorney-is-powerless.html

How do you get a Power of Attorney document?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20785

Power of Attorney (string of blog entries)
http://blog.123notary.com/?tag=power-of-attorney

Share
>

June 22, 2018

How do you get a Power of Attorney Document?

I run a Notary directory, and people who hire Notaries often have Power of Attorney documents of various descriptions. It is important to understand that not all Power of Attorney documents were created equal and there are legal standards as well as preferences of the document custodians that need to be taken into consideration.

Legal Considerations
Legally, you probably need to consult an Attorney to figure out what rights to grant to another person (grantee) and under what circumstances and what legal language to grant such powers. I cannot assist with this because I am not an Attorney, and even if I were, I would probably not be practicing in your state.

Document Custodian Considerations
Document custodians are another party that you have to please with Powers of Attorney. A document custodian is the party that accepts your document. For example, if you get a POA for a particular bank, they will want a Banking Power of Attorney done their way which often means using their forms and not some form you got at a stationary store that looks equally good to you. The custodian has the right to choose what type of form they want in many instances.

Recording Documents
I am not an Attorney and do not know if/when/how/why Power of Attorney forms are recorded at your county’s county recorder. But, find out if you need to record it in their files ahead of time. There is normally a fee for this and it involves a visit to a government office, standing in line, not knowing what room to go to, etc.

Types of Powers of Attorney.
There are Medical Powers of Attorney, Durable Powers of Attorney where you can switch powers on an off sometimes, Banking Power of Attorney documents, and Limited Powers of Attorney as well. Living Wills are yet another specialized type of Medical Power of Attorney that deal specifically with what happens if the Grantor becomes incapacitated or is unable to make their own decisions while bedridden, etc.

Drafting of Documents
Normally, it is a good idea to consult with an Attorney before creating a Power of Attorney. Since it is a legal document, you cannot have any old person draft it for you. It should be an Attorney, or someone legally authorized to draft documents which rules out most Notary Public practitioners. Banks normally use their own forms, so ask the bank what form they require. Additionally, there are legal support firms who employ Legal Assistants, Paralegals, and a few who outsource low paying legal work to New Delhi where they do a very good job at a third of the cost. You can ask these types of agencies what they recommend and who is authorized to draft your document. Your best bet however, is an Attorney if you can afford it. Even if the Attorney doesn’t draft the document him/herself, at least he/she is supervising and taking responsibility for it which makes it potentially a lot safer for you to get a quality output.

Notarizing Documents
Any commissioned Notary Public can notarize your document in their state of commission. Please do not expect or ask the Notary to explain or understand any legal document. Non-Attorney Notaries may not give specific interpretations or explanations of documents other than general statements (in certain states) about what the document is generally about with no specifics mentioned. The Notary’s job is simply to check your ID, make sure you signed the document, the journal (required in most states, recommended by us in any state as that is your only written evidence of the notarial transaction), and fill out certificate forms that correspond to your document.

Legal Technical Terms
If you are creating a Power of Attorney, there is a lot of legalese which an Attorney can help you understand. The main terms are:

Grantor — the person giving power to another
Grantee — the person receiving special powers from the document
Agent — another name for the person who receives power and can complete tasks for the Grantor.
Principal — the main person signing the document who is the Grantor by definition.
Attorney in Fact — the most commonly used term for the agent / person receiving power of attorney.
Capacity — If you have special powers or a special position in a company, that can be described as a capacity. Being an Attorney in Fact or AIF is considered a capacity that can be indicated on certain Notary forms.

Signing in your capacity as Attorney in Fact.
There are eight ways that I have seen to sign as an Attorney in Fact. Please be advised that the particular verbiage is very particular and can be decided by an Attorney or document custodian. If they want it one way, and you sign with even one comma out of place, the entire document might be rejected and need to be resigned. Here are some common ways to sign, but ask your contact person before you sign anything, as the verbiage does matter.

John Smith, as Attorney in Fact for Sally Smith
Sally Smith, by John Smith, her Attorney in Fact
John Smith, POA for Sally Smith
John Smith, AIF for Sally Smith

Summary
In some of these variations, the signer signs the name of the other person (which I am not comfortable with) and then describes their capacity. In other variations, you sign your own name, and then indicate your capacity after a comma after your name. As always, I cannot and will not give legal advice, so, ask an Attorney before you have a Power of Attorney drafted, and before you sign the document and before you sign in your capacity as Attorney in Fact.

If you need a Mobile Notary Public, visit the advanced search page of 123notary.com and lookup by zip, city or county and find about 7000 Notaries Public nationwide, many of whom are very knowledgeable and experienced.

Good luck!

.

You might also like:

Index of posts about Power of Attorney
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20255

Power of Attorney of the Future
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=18948

Logic errors can cost you as a notary
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20110

Share
>
Older Posts »