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November 11, 2013

Affidavits — What do you need to know?

BLOG: Affidavits

What is an Affidavit?
An Affidavit is generally a document that has an accompanying Sworn Oath. The person who swears under Oath is the Affiant or Deponent. The person giving the Oath could be a Notary Public, Justice of the Peace, Court Recorder, Commissioner of Oaths, Judge, or other type of official who has the authorization and capacity to give Sworn Oaths.

What types of Affidavits are there?
There are many types of Affidavits. Many are for business. There are various types of Affidavits used in loan signings such as Signature Affidavits, and Occupancy Affidavits. A Financial Status Affidavit is also common in loan signings. For people who want to be able to come to the United States, sometimes it is necessary for a relative or loved one to sign an Affidavit of Support. Many people who lost their passports and can’t find their Birth Certificates sign and swear to an Affidavit of Citizenship.

There are many other types of Affidavits as well!
Jurats commonly have an attestation clause at the end certifying the fact that the affiant made an Oath and the date and signatures.

Other common types of Affidavits:
Affidavit of Heirship, Affidavit of Residence, Affidavit of Name Change, Affidavit of Service, Financial Affidavit, Affidavfit of Domicile, Affidavit of Death, ID Theft Affidavit.

What types of wording can you use in an Affidavit?
You can word an Affidavit any way you like, but if it is to be used as a legal document, please consult an Attorney. Additionally, please do not ask a notary public to draft documents, because many states have restrictions as to what a notary public is allowed to do, especially if it borders on what Attorneys typically do.

How do I get an Affidavit notarized?
Please find a notary on 123notary.com! We have 7000 mobile notaries throughout the nation waiting to help you. Just visit our find a notary page in the navigation bar above!

You might also like:

Index of posts about commonly notarized documents
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20258

Notarizing a Name Affidavit
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=4711

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March 1, 2012

Sample Affidavits & Sample Oaths

Notaries have to perform Oaths as part of their job.  But, many have no idea how to do this. If you are notarizing an Affidavit, you generally use a Jurat form, and you need an accompanying Oath. It is an infraction of notary law to omit the Oath, so don’t forget!
 
How do you word an Oath? 

Let’s say, that you have an Affidavit about some business arrangement in front of you.  You watch the signer sign the document in front of you as is required.  Then, it is Oath time… 
 
Oaths generally begin with:
“Please raise your right hand!”
“Do you solemnly swear…”  You could begin with, “Do you solemnly swear to tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth?”
 
But, what is the purpose of the Oath about the Affidavit?  You need to have the signer swear that they understand the document, agree to the document, and will abide by the terms of the document which is usually some sort of contract.
 
When I was doing this job, my standard Oath verbiage was:
“Please raise your right hand… Do you solemnly swear that the contents of this document are true and correct, that you agree to it, and will abide by the terms in this document?”
 
The answer that I accept is a clear, “I do”.  I never accept grunts, or uhs, or ahs. People don’t always take Oaths seriously, but I do, or should I say, “I do!”.
 
If you are notarizing five affidavits for an individual, do one separate Oath for each notarized document or signature.
 
Good luck!

You might also like:

When are you required by law to do Oaths?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=21017

Affidavit of Support
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=17528

Notary Public Oath of Office Information
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=2545

Airline meals verses Notary Oaths & Affirmations
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19549

Oaths – How Notaries completely screw them up!
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19369

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December 3, 2011

Notarized Affidavits Information

Notarized Affidavits

There are many types of Affidavits that show up before notaries throughout the country. Commonly notarized Affidavits include: Affidavits of Citizenship, Affidavits of Support, Business Affidavits, Affidavit of Occupancy, Signature Affidavits, and Affidavit of Financial Status. The main thing to understand about Affidavits, is that they are normally notarized using a Jurat certificate. However, the notary is not allowed to choose or recommend a particular type of certificate for the signer or client. However, it is not a crime to say that people “usually” use a Jurat when doing this type of notarization as long as you clarify that you are not advising them. Affidavits normally contain sworn statements In any case, affidavits usually contain a sworn statement or a Jurat certificate which by definition contains a sworn statement.

The signer is supposed to sign in the presence of a notary, and then raise his/her/their right hand and swear under oath that they consider the contents of the document to be true and correct, and that they will abide by the conditions in the affidavit (if there are any). I am generalizing what the oath should be about. It is up to the notary to make up an Oath, so make something up that makes sense under the circumstances. What is an affiant? An affiant is the person who swears under oath to the contents of an Affidavit. Administer an Oath Just for the record, a notary is a person who is in charge of various notary acts including administering an Oath. You might also use the word “give” in association with giving an oath, although it is more normal to use the term “administer”.

Sample Oath for a Notarized Affidavit
Q. Do you solemnly swear that the contents of this document are true and correct, and that you agree to abide by the terms in this Affidavit?
A. I do.

Where can I find a notary to notarize an affidavit?
Just visit the advanced search page of www.123notary.com and you can find many choices of notaries in your area anywhere in the United States.

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You might also like:

See our string on Affidavits
http://blog.123notary.com/?s=affidavit

Oaths — how Notaries completely screw them up
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19369

Affidavit of Support
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=17528

The Signature Name Affidavit
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=13190

Airline Meals vs. Oaths & Affirmations
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19549

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May 24, 2024

Key Spots Where Notaries Are In Demand

Filed under: General Articles — Tags: — Tom Wilkins @ 12:00 am

The demand for notaries has grown significantly in today’s fast-paced and constantly changing world. Notaries act as impartial witnesses for the signing of important documents, guaranteeing their authenticity and legality. Knowing the places that need notaries can help simplify processes and reassure homeowners and business owners. This article explores the areas where notaries are essential, providing valuable insights into their responsibilities across different settings.

Real Estate Transactions

One of the most common places where notaries are needed is in real estate transactions. Homebuyers and sellers often require notarized documents to finalize sales, transfer deeds, and secure mortgages. The presence of a notary ensures that all parties involved are who they claim to be and that the transaction is conducted legally. This step is crucial for preventing fraud and ensuring the smooth transfer of property ownership.

Legal Applications

Legal documents are another significant area where notaries are in demand. Contracts, affidavits, and power of attorney documents often need notarization to be considered valid and enforceable in court. Notaries play a critical role in verifying the identities of signatories and ensuring that they are signing willingly and without coercion. This verification helps maintain the integrity of legal proceedings and protects the interests of all parties involved.

Financial Institutions

Banks and other financial institutions frequently require notarized documents for various transactions. Whether opening a new account, securing a loan, or executing a financial power of attorney, notaries ensure that all paperwork is properly authenticated. Their involvement helps prevent identity theft and fraud, providing an additional security layer for the institution and its clients.

Business Operations

Businesses often encounter situations that necessitate the services of a notary. From verifying the authenticity of employee documents to notarizing contracts and agreements, notaries provide essential support to ensure compliance with legal standards. Their presence is particularly crucial during mergers and acquisitions, where the accuracy and legality of documentation can significantly impact the transaction’s outcome.

Healthcare Facilities

In healthcare settings, notaries are in demand for authenticating advance directives, medical power of attorney forms, and healthcare proxies. These documents are vital for ensuring patient’s wishes are respected in medical settings. A notary present guarantees that these sensitive documents are correctly executed, providing clarity and assurance for patients and healthcare providers.

Government Offices

Certain government documents, such as permits, licenses, and immigration papers, often require notarization. Government offices use notaries to verify applicants’ identities and ensure the accuracy of the information provided, helping maintain the integrity of public records and services.

Educational Institutions

Schools and universities also require notarized documents, especially for international students. Notaries verify transcripts, diplomas, and other educational credentials. This ensures that the documents are authentic and recognized by other institutions and employers.

Shipping and Mailing Services

Another surprising yet significant area where notaries are needed is shipping and mailing services. Places like UPS and FedEx offer notary services for customers who need documents notarized before shipping them. This convenience benefits those who must securely send important legal or financial documents. If you’re looking for a FedEx drop-off point, many of them provide notary services on-site.

Understanding the Importance of Notaries

The demand for notaries spans various sectors, from real estate to healthcare, emphasizing their critical role in ensuring the legality and authenticity of essential documents. Whether you are a homeowner navigating a property sale or a business owner securing a significant contract, the presence of a notary provides invaluable peace of mind. Recognizing the places that need notaries empowers individuals and businesses to conduct their affairs confidently and honestly.

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July 28, 2023

High Demand for Notaries: Fact or Fiction?

Filed under: General Articles — Tags: , — Tom Wilkins @ 12:00 am

Are notaries in high demand? It is a question that both new and experienced practitioners of the notary business must face. While many view notaries as essential components of businesses, legal processes, and other services, there are still questions about whether or not being a notary is profitable or beneficial to those who sign up for the job. In this post, we will look at cold hard facts from reliable sources to see if being a notary is in high demand or just media hype.

The Evolution of Notary Services

Before exploring the present scenario, it’s essential to understand the historical significance of notaries. Throughout history, notaries have played a vital role in ensuring the authenticity and legality of various documents, from wills and contracts to affidavits and deeds. Traditionally, notaries would physically witness the signing of documents, putting their official seal and signature to attest to the event’s legitimacy. With the rise of digital transformation, some may have speculated that traditional notaries would become obsolete. Still, this assumption overlooks the resilience and adaptability of the profession.

Current Demand for Notaries

Contrary to the notion that notaries are fading into obscurity, the demand for their services remains robust in various industries and sectors. Are notaries in high demand? As transactions have increasingly globalized, the need for authenticated documents across borders has surged, putting notaries in high demand. Moreover, certain industries, such as real estate, finance, and legal services, heavily rely on notaries to certify the validity of agreements and contracts.

Real Estate Sector

The real estate industry relies heavily on notaries to authenticate property deeds, mortgage agreements, and other critical documents. Whether it’s a residential property purchase or a commercial real estate deal, notaries are essential in ensuring the smooth transfer of ownership and protecting the interests of all parties involved.

Financial Services

Banking and financial institutions often require notarized documents to facilitate various transactions, such as loan agreements, refinancing, and estate planning. The assurance provided by a notary’s signature and seal adds an extra layer of security to these crucial financial transactions.

Legal Profession

Within the legal sector, notaries are essential for witnessing affidavits, power of attorney documents, and statutory declarations. Courts and legal institutions require notarized documents as evidence in many cases, making the services of notaries a constant necessity in legal proceedings.

Adapting to the Digital Age

Recognizing the potential of technology to streamline processes and enhance accessibility, notaries have adapted to the digital age. Remote online notarization (RON) has emerged as a game-changer, enabling notaries to officiate documents virtually. Notaries can witness and authenticate signatures remotely through secure online platforms, making it convenient for clients and expanding their reach beyond geographical boundaries.

This technology integration has not only sustained the relevance of notaries but has also opened up new opportunities. RON has significantly increased efficiency in the notary process, reducing the need for physical appointments and paperwork, thus saving time and resources for both notaries and clients.

The Global Perspective

The demand for notaries is wider than in any specific region. As international trade and cross-border transactions flourish, the requirement for notarized documents has escalated globally. For instance, businesses engaging in foreign partnerships often need notarized documents to ensure the validity of agreements in different jurisdictions. Additionally, individuals immigrating to other countries or seeking dual citizenship must provide notarized documentation for legal and identity verification purposes.

Notaries In High Demand—Act Now For Success!

In conclusion, notaries are in high demand. More and more people and businesses require their services to approve various documents. Becoming a notary is a great way to earn extra income while helping to ensure that essential agreements and contracts are properly validated. Furthermore, recognizing the increasing reliance on technology can open up even more excellent opportunities for smart notaries to obtain greater success by developing the necessary technical skills and expanding into new business areas. Notaries represent an invaluable role in our society, and with the right resources, they can leverage their services for maximum success in today’s ever-evolving digital world. So if you’re looking for a reliable career option that offers diverse growth opportunities, becoming a notary could be just right for you.are notaries in high demand

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May 6, 2021

Can a person swear on behalf of another person

Filed under: Technical & Legal — admin @ 10:45 am

If John has power of attorney for Sue, can he swear under Oath for Sue? No, he can’t. But, he can sign documents on Sue’s behalf.

To sum it up, he can swear at Sue, for not swear for Sue.

This is an issue doing loan signings involving Powers of Attorney. Most of these signings have Affidavits that need to be sworn to. So, the agent swears to them. And that is that.

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November 13, 2020

Penalties for Notary misconduct, fraud, and failure of duty

Filed under: Notary Mistakes — Tags: , , — admin @ 11:23 am

Originally posted in 2018

Notaries by and large do not willfully engage in any type of illegal activity or illegal notarizations. The normal types of crimes Notaries commit are due to complete ignorance of Notary procedure, Oaths, and certificates. The only serious and purposeful crime I have ever heard of a Notary associated with us committing was one that assisted someone in fraud concerning real property — and the Notary ended up in jail. Please keep in mind that Notary law is different in every state and changes all the time as well. Penalties and fines for Notary misconduct are different in each state, California being the most stringent.

Negligent vs. Willful Misconduct

In California, the penalties are much more severe for Notaries who have engaged in willful misconduct rather than just making a careless mistake or omission.

Failure to keep your seal & journal under lock and key.
In California this is very serious and is a crime. You can keep your Notary equipment in a bag with a small lock that locks the zippers together. If you are the only one with access to your car, then the trunk of your car could work as well.

Unauthorized Practice of Law
The definition of UPL differs from state to state. However, offering opinions on legal matters or offering to draft legal documents might constitute UPL. For a professional opinion — ask an Attorney!

Asking a notary to do an improper notarization.
This is a misdemeanor in California. If it involves real property, then it is much more serious. Clients might ask you to notarize their signature using a different name variation that is not documented on their identification, or put a false date. This is illegal. They would guilty for asking you to do this, and you would be guilty if you give in to their pressure. If you have driven forty minutes to a signing job, in a sense you have a beneficial interest in notarizing their document unless you have gotten your travel fee up front when you walk in the door. So, to be prudent and avoid this issue, you MUST get your travel fee BEFORE you see the document, or are informed who the signers are, or see their ID, because a conflict of interest can easily happen. If someone asks you to do something illegal, you can threaten to report them to the Secretary of State’s office. This is a serious crime and you should treat it as such.

Issuing a false certificate
A notary who signs and seals false certificates, and this could include backdated certificates would be guilty of a misdemeanor. A false Acknowledgment certificate constitutes FORGERY. Additionally, the notary public could have their commission revoked if found guilty of this crime, with an additional fine of $1500 per incident in California (fines change over time so look this up in the statues).

Failure to Identify a Credible Witness
A fine of $10,000 per incident could occur if a notary fails to check a credible witness’s identification documents and see that they have acceptable identification.

Failure to get a thumbprint!!!
This is my favorite. Thumbprints are critical for identifying a signer if fraud is suspected. Powers of Attorney and Deeds require a journal thumbprint in California. A fine of up to $2500 per incident would be the penalty. Most other states do not require thumbprints, and Texas and Florida actually recommend against thumbprinting as those states do not trust Notaries with biometric data which is the only foolproof way to identify a signer. How ironic!

Failure to administer an Oath
A fine of $750 per incident could be incurred, not to mention revocation, or suspension of a notary commission, or refusal to grant a commission. I heard that some Notaries in Oklahoma had to go to court for a loan document signing in question. The Judge found out that the Notaries had not administered Oaths on the Affidavits in the loan package. I heard that the Judge overturned the loan and had the Notaries commissions permanently revoked by their state.

Felony Convictions
If you have a felony conviction or have been convicted of a crime involving dishonesty or moral turpitude, you will most likely not be allowed to get a notary commission in the first place. If you already had a notary commission, it would be suspended or revoked the minute your state’s ntoary division finds out about it!

Professional Misconduct
This refers to dishonesty in your professional activities. The penalty would once again be suspension, revocation, or refusal to grant a notary commission.

Failure of Duty
This means that you refuse to serve a member of the public who has a legitimate request for a notarization. However, if the signer doesn’t have proper identification, or doesn’t have a properly filled out document, or seems very questionable, you have the right to refuse service to such a client. The penalty would be refusal to grant a notary commission, suspension, or revocation of a notary commission. Additionally a fine of $750 could be imposed on the California notary public.

Falsely Acting as a Notary
This is a misdemeanor. Borrowing someone’s Notary seal and doing Notary work is a serious crime. If you are a Notary, keep your seal and journal locked up.

Making false statements to a notary
Anyone who induces a notary to make an improper notarization with regards to real property can be found guilty of a FELONY. This is the most serious type of fraud possible in the notary profession.

False or misleading notary advertising
Making false statements in notary advertising is illegal, and the penalty for a California Notary is $1500 per incident. Additionally, such a notary’s commission could be suspended, revoked, terminated, or there could be a refusal to issue a commission. Claiming to be an immigration expert, or be able to give legal advice could be a serious example of false advertising and perhaps unauthorized practice of law.

Selling personal information
It is illegal for the notary sells or misuses personal information of those he/she has notarized. Remember to keep your journals locked up, so that nobody can have access to that information. When making copies of journal entries, make sure that the neighboring journal entries are covered, so that their information is not shared with the public. Once again, your application could be denied, or your commission could be revoked or suspended for this type of crime.

Misstatements on a notary application (Application misstatement)
Your notary commission could be suspended, revoked, or refused if you are guilty of this misconduct

Here are some other crimes… I will just list them here, but may or may not describe the penalties.

Failure to deliver a journal to the county clerk at the end of your commission. – misdemeanor
Failure to safeguard seal and journal – revoke/suspend/refuse
Failure to report a lost or damaged seal – $1500 fine
Nonpayment of judgement / Refusal to pay child support – refusal to issue a commission
Failure to keep a journal – such notaries will be prosecuted

There are a few others laws that I am not going to mention, but these were the interesting ones…

You might also like:

A Notary loses $4000 in legal fees because someone changed a name on a certificate

Notary loses $4000 in legal fees because fraud adds name to Acknowledgment certificate.

All you need to know about notary work

All you need to know about notary work

How to complain about a notary public

How to complain about a notary public

Notary Fines and Penalties

Notary Fines & Notary Penalties (gulp)

Fraud and Forgery in the Notary Profession

Fraud & Forgery related to the notary profession

Notary Public General Information

Notary Public Information

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October 15, 2020

Names for Notary Businesses with Commentary

Filed under: Business Tips — admin @ 8:15 am

Notaries love to read about names for Notary businesses. Some names are geographical, some are funny, and some get you in trouble. Others sound cliche and a few are catchy. Here are some names we see and a few we made up for fun.

Notary 4 U
Now there is a name that works well on an email address.

Signatures 4 Less
Sounds like a bargain

Notaries R Us
Sounds like a Toys R Us commercial. Affidavits are in aisle three.

Seals on Wheels or Notary on Wheels
This on is popular.

Seal the Deal Mobile Notary
Talk about getting things done.

The Notarizer or The Noterator
I think Arnold has registered this name already.

Have Stamp Will Travel
Brings back memories of the old West.

What’s Up Docs
This signing service ended up not doing that well. People thought their name was goofy. But, Bugs Bunny liked it and that’s all that matters to me.

A1 Notary Services
Try this service out when Worcestershire Notary Services is busy!

Notary 90210
Great service, but discounts are probably not their thing in that zip code.

Notary Now
On a busy day, they temporarily change their name to Notary Later.

Jesus (pronounced Hey-soos) & the 12 Apostilles 24 hour Mobile Notary
“We’ll get the job done come hell or high water.”
Sounds like a great name for a Hispanic Notary & Apostille / Authentication Service.

Vampire 24 Hour Notary
“We are Vampires and never sleep. Our price for a Jurat is half a pint of blood with a straw.”

Right on Time Mobile Notary
If you worked for Domino’s Pizza you’ll have an in getting a job from these guys.

Prestige Mobile Notaries
I think the 90210 is still a better idea. Don’t say it — show it…

Royal Notary Service
I’m sure this is where Queen Elizabeth gets her Affidavits.

A. Paul Steele
Sounds like a great name unless your clients want an Authentication!

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You might also like:

Names for Notary businesses that can get you in trouble
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19064

Geographic Notary Business Names
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19060

Notary Business Names
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=2302

Choosing a name for a business license
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=7103

You could get sued if you don’t have a business license
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=7100

Deceptive Identities – Companies that change their names
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=1090

Stealing a Business Name
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=2660

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November 13, 2019

How can I find a Cantonese speaking notary public?

Filed under: Public Interest — Tags: , — admin @ 5:45 am

Where can I find a Cantonese speaking notary public?

At 123notary.com, we receive all types of inquiries from many types of people all the time. Where can I find Roger Smith, he is a notary in Louisiana? He notarized a document for me a year ago, and now I can’t find him. I refer the inquirer to the Louisiana notary division, since they have the addresses of all currently commissioned notaries in the state. I also get a few people asking me where they can find a notary in India, or Thailand. I refer them to the embassy, or ask them to find an attorney in the country in question. I give sensible advice, and steer people the right direction, but honestly, I don’t have a lot of information myself that is good for answering most of the questions I get. The harder requests are requests that I would LIKE to be able to fulfill, but sometimes it’s hard.

Where can I find a Cantonese speaking notary?
123notary.com has many bilingual notaries. You can use the LANGUAGE FILTER on the top right of the search results page after you do a search by zip code. Many of our bilingual notaries are Cantonese Speaking notaries, however, they are all spread out. You might find many Cantonese speaking notaries in any big city, but we have relatively few advertising on our site. You can do a search by zip code and then use the language filter on the upper right side of the page. Try inputting the term Cantonese, and then try Chinese as a second search. See what happens. I cannot guarantee results because people join our directory daily, and change their language information from time to time, and drop out from time to time as well.

If you can’t find a Cantonese speaking notary on 123notary…. then…
The document signer needs to speak the same language as the notary in California and many other states. As a practice, even if your state doesn’t require it, the signer should be able to communicate directly with the notary. You could try the Chinese yellow pages, or ask around in your metro’s Chinatown. There will be plenty of Cantonese Chinese speaking notaries, but they might not advertise much as their business might come from word of mouth or 朋友推薦朋

It is common for Cantonese speaking people who function mainly in Cantonese 廣東話 to pick service providers who also speak their language. However, this might not be a good idea. If your English is “Good enough”, you might be better off with an English speaking notary who is really good at what they do, and who is familiar with commonly notarized affidavits and documents. Just my opinion. Choose the skill set before you choose the cultural affinity if you have a choice!

To find a Mandarin speaking notary, just look up Mandarin in the language filter on search results. To find a Taiwanese speaking notary, just look up Taiwanese in the language filter. To find a Cantonese speaking notary, just type the word Cantonese in the language filter in the upper right corner of the search result pages. Honestly, the word “Chinese” will give you much wider results than these dialect names, but in NYC or San Francisco, you might find the dialect of your choice! 祝你好運

You might also like:

How to find a bilingual notary public
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=2520

Notarizing your foreign language document
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=2768

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October 25, 2019

How long does it take to fill in the journal entries for one loan?

Filed under: Journals — admin @ 11:47 pm

Many Notaries use the “cram it in” style of journal entries and claim that it saves time and that it is okay. But, there are several problems with it. First of all, what is the cram it in system of filling in your journal?

If you put multiple documents in on a single journal entry — that is what I call the “cram it in” journal entry style. Normally there is a single signer for these multiple docs on the entry, but some people put two which is even more crazy. Below are the problems associated with this wrongful technique.

1. Fees
Most states allow a Notary to charge a maximum fee per Notary act. If you put multiple Notary acts on a single journal line, you cannot document what you charged for each Notary act.

2. Notary Act Type
If you are notarizing multiple documents in a loan, traditionally there will be different Notary types. There will be acknowledgments for the Deeds and perhaps other documents and Jurats for the Affidavits. You cannot distinguish which document received which type of notarization if you use the cram it in method of journal entries.

3. Court Issues
If your signing goes to court, the signer could claim to not have authorized the notarization of any of the documents listed in your journal as you theoretically could be in cahutz with the Lender and could have added the names of more documents after the fact. It is rare to have an issue in court due to the cram it in method, but I have heard of two examples in my career about how it makes the court case a lot more confusing and you can’t prove that someone consented to be notarized. It can result in a situation that looks like fraud was likely. Why put yourself in that position?

4. Kosher Issues
It just isn’t kosher to add extra document names in a single journal entry. Proper journal entry procedure means one document and one signer per entry — that’s it.

SUMMARY
It is easier to just fill out the journal entries one by one. You might have to write the address many times. It might take about 45 seconds per entry, and with a loan of 12 notarized signatures you might spend 10 minutes total filling out the journal and another minute getting people to sign and thumbprint multiple times. That is about 8 minutes longer than the cram it in method and could save you lots of time in court after the fact. Additionally, if your state audits journals, it could save your career — a valid point to remember in California and in the future perhaps other regions!

You might also like:

Travel fees vs. Notary fees in your journal
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22612

Notary Public 101 – a comprehensive guide to journals
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19511

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