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January 27, 2019

Witnessing a Will

Filed under: Technical & Legal — Tags: , — admin @ 3:53 am

It is traditional procedure for Will signings to be witnessed. Normally, there would be two witnesses over the age of eighteen to witness the signing of a Will. In Vermont, there would need to be three witnesses. It is not a bad idea, but not necessary to have a Notary Public be one of the witnesses.

A Notary Public does not normally notarized the principal’s signature on a Will unless an Attorney asks them to in writing. However, it is not a bad idea for a Notary Public to notarized the signatures of the witnesses at a Will signing for a Last Will and Testament.

It is very critical for a will to be signed using the same name variation that is printed below the signature line. It is also critical that the signature is dated appropriately. The signature must be at the end or bottom of the document. Witnesses must not only sign, but also print their name very clearly and legibly below their signatures and the date.

It is a good practice for the witnesses to inscribe (write) their address and perhaps phone number as well should they need to be contacted by investigators at any time for any reason. The witnesses should not only see the principal signer sign, but should also witness each other sign.

When choosing witnesses, be advised that they might have to be questioned or even appear in court after the fact. The closer their know you the better. However, the fact that they know you and/or watched you sign is technically enough. The witnesses should not have a beneficial interest or financial interest in the signing of the Will. So, it is better to have people know you, but not people who are inheriting money, rights or property from you as witnesses to the signing.

Once the will is signed, you should make photocopies, and can consider having your Attorney, executors, and/or document custodians have possession of the copies. Please consult your Attorney to make sure you have the correct party having possession of your will. And if amendments need to be made, the document custodian will need to have the revised edition. The actual documents should be saved in a safe, dry place — perhaps a file drawer or lock box.

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January 6, 2014

Can a Notary notarize a Will or Living Will?

To make it quick and simple — Yes, a Notary can notarize signatures on a Will, although it is generally discouraged unless given written instructions by an Attorney. Wills are normally witnessed, but not notarized. But then, why be normal?

Can a notary witness a Will?
YES, a Notary can witness the signing of any document. However, it is discouraged for a notary to be involved in any transaction as a witness or Notary where they might have beneficial interest or financial interest! If the notary benefits in any way from a Will being signed or is closely related to a beneficiary, they could be said to have beneficial interest. Anybody eighteen years of age or older who can sign their own name and watch someone else sign can be a witness to a will. It is that simple!

Can a notary draft a Will?
Document drafting might be considered part of the practice of law in your state. You can ask your state bar association if a Notary can draft a document, or if a notary can draft a legal document. The answer is most likely no. Unless you are trained and authorized, I would stay away from document drafting of legal documents since it is so sensitive!

Then who can draft a Will?
Ask an Attorney to help you draft a Will. Ask the Attorney if the Will should be notarized or only witnessed. The witnesses of the Will can also be notarized by the way!

What about a Living Will?
Living Wills are typically very long documents drafted by Attorneys who specialize in Health Care legal documents. Health Care Power Of Attorney documents are close relatives of Living Wills. Living Wills are typically notarized and often need a notarization in the middle of the document as well as at the end of the potentially dozens of pages.

Can a notary notarize a Living Will?
Sure!

How about a Dying Will or a Won’t? Or a Living Will that doesn’t have a pulse! I know a Notary who is dying to notarize a Won’t with or without instructions from an Attorney!

Tweets:
(1) Yes, Notary can notarize signatures on a Will, although it is generally discouraged w/o written instructions from an Attorney.
(2) Document drafting may or may not be considered practicing law in your state. Ask the Bar Association.
(3) The difference between a regular Will and a Living Will is that the latter has a pulse.

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Types of witnesses in the Notary profession
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=5664

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