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March 11, 2018

If you have 2 signers each signing 10 Grant Deeds

Filed under: Loan Signing 101 — Tags: , , — admin @ 11:20 am

If you have two signers each signing ten Grant Deeds, how many journal entries should you create and what should you put in the document section?

Wrong Answer
Just create one journal entry and enter both names of the signers and in the document section put ten Grant Deeds.

Another Wrong Answer
Create one journal entry per signing and put “Ten Grant Deeds” where it says name and description of document. Don’t forget to create a journal thumbprint if you want to safeguard against fake identification.

Correct Answer
Create twenty entries, that is ten per signing. Write the term Grant Deed in the document section as well as some unique identifying information about each Grant Deed such as:

Document date, address of property, APN number, name of grantor, grantee, or anything else that is unique.

Why?
If one of the Grant Deeds you notarized for a particular client ends up in court and your journal is queried, you will need to let the judge know which of your journal entries reflects the one for the particular Grant Deed in question. If you did not keep your journal straight in this respect, there could be a debate as to whether you even notarized that particular Grant Deed or if an impostor did. Your journal is not for fun, but is to safeguard you the Notary, Judges, FBI agents, your clients, and society as a whole.
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Notary Public 101 — Journals
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19511

Journal abbreviation keys
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19441

Do you keep a journal to please your state, a judge, the FBI, or 123notary?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19483

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December 19, 2017

Do you keep a journal to please your state, a judge, the FBI, or 123notary?

Most Notaries do not keep a journal because their state doesn’t require it. This is a mistake. Your journal is your only evidence in court. Many Notaries who list with us end up in court. However, since most of our Notaries keep some sort of journal records, their time in court is normally just a visit to the judge’s chambers where the judge might dismiss the case due to good evidence provided by the Notary.

Some Notaries keep a journal, but do so in a fashion I call minimal, where they do not keep the book according to NNA best practices and do not record thumbprints. Since their law might not require any journal, the Notaries often figure that they are already doing more than necessary so why do the maximum?

The answer is that your journal thumbprint which most of you refuse to keep is the ONLY way a judge or investigator can figure out who the signer is in the case of a falsified ID given to the Notary. You don’t know if an ID given to you is real, fake or falsified. But, the thumbprint is real. So you accept ID that can be falsified but refuse to take ID which is genuine — stupid! Take both.

The bottom line is that the real reason you should keep a journal is NOT to please your state (although you must uphold the laws of your state.) California is the only state I have ever heard of who audits people’s journals. If you live outside of California, the chance of your state ever seeing your journal is minimal. However, it is very likely that a judge, an investigator, or the DOJ might need to look at your journal in the case of identity theft. So, keep your journal with the intention of making their lives easier AND making sure that they don’t consider you to be a suspect! Keeping inadequate journal records is suspicious, do don’t be shoddy — be thorough!

Additionally, Jeremy (that’s me) at 123notary is sick and tired of Notaries who are shoddy and don’t keep good records. Keeping a journal is not good enough. You must keep one journal entry per person per document and thumbprint for serious documents such as deeds to please Jeremy. Jeremy wants investigators to be able to catch bad guys, so if you deny them the critical piece of evidence (a thumbprint) to catch the bad guys, then in my opinion — YOU are a bad guy! I would personally throw you in a lion’s den for not keeping a thumbprint if I could have it my way. But, I am not in charge of the world — I’m only in charge of my site.

So, if 123notary gives you a little phone quiz and asks you some questions and we find out that you don’t keep your journal correctly we will deduct points from your score. If we find out you make excuses for your abhorrant behavior, you lose even more points. Why act like a disobedient third grader when nothing prevents you from keeping good books! Only you can prevent forest fires and only you can provide the missing link to catching identity thieves — so do a good job otherwise you will get into a little trouble with 123notary. But, your state won’t care because states other than California don’t seem to take the Notary profession at all seriously! Food for thought!

Summary
Don’t keep your journal to please your state. In real life they will never see it unless you live in CA. Keep your journal using the best practices possible to please a judge, jury, the FBI, KGB, the Mossad, and Jeremy from 123notary. I will penalize you if you don’t keep good books as that reflects poorly on my reputation!

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You might also like:

Notary Public 101 – Journals
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19511

Do you keep a journal? Don’t wait until you get a call from the FBI.
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19377

How many journal entries do you use for two signers on three documents?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19391

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July 23, 2012

I would need a new journal every week!

I would need a new notary journal every week?
 
We had a discussion question on Facebook where we told them that you need a journal entry for each signature per document.  If you have two signers and seven documents, that is fourteen journal entries.  A few notaries stated that IF that was the case, they would need a new journal every week.  This is not true.  A notary journal has more than 500 entries.  I think mine had 512, but I am not sure since I have not had a journal for years.  If the average signing uses 12 entries, then you will have room for 40 full loan signings.  A busy notary might do that many in two or three weeks.  If you are that busy, you need to buy your journals by the dozen to get a better rate, and always have a spare one in your car or your notary carry all bag.
 
What scares me is not so much how many journals a busy notary needs, but the lack of professionalism out there.  The state governments allow people to become notaries who don’t even have a clue as how to fill out their journals, and nobody coaches them or audits them — ever!!! Gulp!!!  No wonder there were phantom signers during the loan crisis, and nobody audited the fraudulent notaries who notarized them — if they were notarized at all.  I feel that if someone can’t handle the basic responsibilities of being a notary, that they shouldn’t be a notary.  And if the various state notary divisions can’t handle keeping an eye on their notaries, that they should reduce the amount of notaries to the point where they can keep an eye on them. 
 
Foreign counties typically reserve the job of notary public for people who are attorneys, or almost as high a position as attorneys.  I think that is a bit too restrictive, but most states need to moniter their notaries a whole lot more — they are not monitering them at all now — or so it seems.
 
On the other hand, perhaps the rules are different state by state.  It also occurs to me that the state notary codes / rules / laws do not specify how many documents you can enter on a single journal entry, so maybe it is the state’s fault.
 
But, here is a logical reason why it should be ONE document per entry.  If you allow multiple documents per entry, if you start with one document, you could ADD a second document name to the journal entry fraudulently — or someone else could add it fraudulently behind your back if they temporarily steal your journal.  Since there is no additional signature in the journal corresponding to that new document, you will have no way of knowing if it is supposed to be there or not.  It would create a situation similar to having blanks in documents that are notarized. After the seal is affixed, nobody knows what types of changes could be made to the documents.

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The dog ate my journal
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http://blog.123notary.com/?p=3353

Everything you need to know about journals
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=70

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