You searched for paypal - Notary Blog - Signing Tips, Marketing Tips, General Notary Advice - 123notary.com
123Notary

Notary Blog – Signing Tips, Marketing Tips, General Notary Advice – 123notary.com Control Panel

August 12, 2018

Bouncey Bouncey PayPal

Filed under: Ken Edelstein — admin @ 11:32 am

It has always been my policy to require payment in advance for a variety of situations. If the job requires me at 4AM, if the caller tried to be “vague”, even if the job is very distant and requires extensive travel. PAID – sounded nice, but it really is a construct when using PayPal that does not include absoluteness. The payer can “bounce” the payment. The PP system is designed to protect the buyer not the merchant. That is a good thing, but can have unexpected implications.

On the good side, I tried to buy a camera from an individual overseas. I made the payment but the item never arrived, nor was it shipped. PP stepped in and returned my funds rather quickly. The seller could not provide a tracking number, big mistake on seller side. PP wants proof of events, not opinions or statements.

On the not so good side (for me) this works against the provider of services; even when the service was delivered perfectly. Over the past decade I have had exactly three contested charges. They were all for the same reason. Simply put the client forgot my name and questioned the charge with their bank. That starts a lengthy process that initially gives my client a refund from my account. All they have to do is “ask” – when their bank asks PP they credit my client and debit me.

And, it’s a long procedure. Even when my client is “reminded” (from assignment email, airbill images, etc), and they tell their bank the charge was valid – it takes PP about 100 days to restore funds to me!

I’m in the car, “Unknown Title” calls with a challenging assignment, as described above. I tell them they need to pay my fee in advance. Historically about a third of them agree, though it’s not their usual business procedure. That’s the problem. When they review their credit card statement they totally forgot what the payment to me “kenneth-a-edelstein.com” was all about. This probably happened many times without a “bounce”. Most probably looked up the web site and recalled that I did indeed work for them and they were satisfied with the results. However, some others do not think to do that, they ask their bank “what’s this all about”.

My regular readers will be disappointed with this installment. Normally I first dwell on the problem then provide a solution. I have none. The good news that in many hundreds of PP payments this has only happened 3 times. Also good news is that I have avoided “duds” that are problem collections. I no longer have the last Monday of the month devoted to “dun the turds”.

PayPal remains an excellent tool to secure advance payment. But you must keep the email history, especially your scan of the return tracking number as factual evidence that PP accepts. I will continue my policy, for example of requiring 4AM callers with an “emergency” to prepay – during the initial call. It stops them from putting you in a position of obligation while they make additional phone calls trying to trim ten dollars from the mobile notary fee. Once a payment is made few “shop around”. Why during the initial 4AM call? I don’t want to be woken up twice for the same assignment. I tell them honestly my cell will be turned off if payment is not received in the next 10 minutes. They “mind” their “business” and I “mind my own business”.

.

You might also like:

Notary Marketing 102 – Getting Paid
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19794

How long should you wait to get paid?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19347

Comedic Notary Pricing from Apo-steal-of-a-deal to Zilch
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=18941

Share
>

October 1, 2019

Getting paid – a comprehensive timeline

Filed under: Marketing Articles — admin @ 11:17 pm

Many Notaries have a problem getting paid. It’s not you — it’s the industry. But, by using good principles, you can avoid most of the drama. Here are some guidelines to help you through every step of the process.

BEFORE THE SIGNING
When you get that call from a particular company, you need to either have records on each company out there, or be able to look them up. That means you either need online records on a cloud, or accessible from your iPhone, or have a cheat sheet in your glove compartment with up to date records on all signing companies. You need to keep track of:

1. How many jobs have they given you
2. Payment record — average # of days to pay
3. How much outstanding
4. Are they pleasant to work for
5. Cancellation rate.
6. What is their track record on the forums and 123notary’s list of signing companies.

If company cancels too much, you should up their rate or make them pay a cancellation fee or nonrefundable deposit up front, otherwise you will be left holding the bag (and the freshly printed documents.) If a company owes you more than a few hundred, you should deny service until they pay up. If a company has no track record with you, please consider asking them to pay up front via Paypal. If you are a newer signing agent and desperate to get experience, you should be more flexible and take more risks so you get experience. People who use 123notary reward Notaries for having a lot of experience.

You can check new companies on your iPhone while on the road to see how they do on the various forums and 123notary’s list of signing companies with reviews. If a company has a bad track record of payment, you should charge up front or you will likely get stiffed. Some of these companies have no remorse.

CONFIRMING THE SIGNING
Confirming the signing using our tips in the real life scenarios section of Notary Public 101 will not help you get paid, but will help you reduce the amount of signings that end in mid-air. If the signer doesn’t have ID with matching names, or if the other signers aren’t going to be there, or if they don’t have that cashier’s check they need — you are better off not going to their house as it will be a waste of time. Signings that end in “no signs” often do not get paid, so by avoiding this type of scenario, you will have less unpaid jobs as a total percentage.

AT THE SIGNING — MISTAKES
Most Notaries brag about how they have a 99.9% accuracy rate. The truth is that most Notaries make mistakes from time to time, and sometimes FedEx or the Lender screws up too resulting in a second trip. In my experience it is very hard to get paid for a second trip. Companies will often offer to pay, and then not pay you. So, triple checking your work and getting packages to FedEx fast will help reduce your rate of non-paying jobs and also help you from getting fired as much.

AFTER THE SIGNING — FAX
After you are done with your signing, fax a bill and include all pertinent information such as the borrower’s name, property address, loan number, and whatever else the signing or title company wants. Send a bill every week by fax or email or whatever medium your company wants. Also, keep records of every signing company you work for, and all of the jobs they assigned to you. When they pay you, you can indicate the date when they paid you to the right of the job description, borrower name, property address on your records. Your records can be paper or online. It is very fast to do this by paper by the way and less chance of data loss unless you keep the paper in your car.

EVERY MONTH — RECORDS
Every month or so, update your records that you keep in your car. Keep records on each signing company. Track how many jobs they gave you, how fast they pay, what they still owe you, how much you like them. You can assign them a grade too. You can have a customized pricing strategy for each company depending on their track record. You can give lower prices for companies you like. I would base prices on estimated time spent and NOT a fixed price. You could have a — near, medium and far price, or a price that is more intricate depending on number of pages, number of signers, distance, time of day, etc. That is up to you. But, having an intricate pricing strategy will make your life a little more complicated, but will weed out the more difficult companies, or at least make them pay for grief they cause you. Otherwise, those companies will think they can get away with causing Notaries endless headaches. You could keep two sets of these records and update them monthly. One at home and one in the car. If someone offers you a job, don’t quote a price until you look at your records and see if they are on the “A” list.

30 DAYS
If a company is past 30 days, time to consider sending them a demand letter. Or you could wait until the 45 day mark depending on how tough you are. We have a demand letter (from hell) template on our resources page. People have had consistently excellent luck with it, and it was given to us by our very most seasoned Notaries on the site.

45-60 DAYS
If anyone gets to this point, definitely send them a demand letter, but consider hiring an Attorney to write a letter threatening them. There are Attorneys who will write a letter for about $30 using their legal assistants. If a company owe you $300 or more, it might be worth it to write a letter. You can also charge for damages which include your time lost and legal fees.

CONTRACTS
We wrote another article on contracts. Signing companies have contracts to protect their interests. Their contract defends what is convenient and good for the signing company but not what is good for the Notary. You can have your own contract too and make people sign it if they want your services. If you are inexperienced, many companies might not sign it. But, if they need you and you have experience, they just might. You can state terms about partial signings, no shows, cancelled jobs, printing fees, resigns, and whatever else you want. Try to be reasonable in your terms if you expect anyone to sign it and continue using your services.

CREDIT
Try to determine before hand how much credit to offer to particular companies. This needs to be customized. Companies with a bad track record should not get any credit and must pay up front. Companies that have been solid towards you for years might get $400. But, don’t offer more than that because good companies turn bad all the time the minute they run into credit problems. Each company you work for should have a credit rating with you and an individual amount of credit you will offer them. When they offer you a job, see how much they are in debt to you already before saying yes, otherwise — it’s Paypal — or no job!

Trouble getting paid?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=15339

Tips for getting paid
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19794

Scary results when someone uses our demand letter from hell
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=2006

Template for our famous demand letter
http://www.123notary.com/howto-get-paid-signing-agent.htm

Share
>

August 23, 2019

More on bad boy Notaries

Filed under: Humorous Posts — admin @ 10:49 pm

I wrote a blog article about the difference between bad boy Notaries and “nice” Notaries. It seems that “nice” Notaries are basically not nice at all, but a bunch of losers who want to attain other’s positive opinion and never assert themselves. The intrinsic meaning of “nice” means that you care for others which is very different from caring about how others think of you which is selfish in a lame sort of a way.

Here are some more things a bad boy Notary could do.

1. The “nice” guy Notary arrives in his Toyota Corolla or Honda, parks on the street even if he has to walk three blocks.
The bad boy Notary arrives at the signing driving a Harley. Of course, if the Harley was really noisy that would add to the bad boy appeal.

2. The ‘nice” guy Notary read copious reviews on buying the most sensible laser printer on the market, yet ends up with one that is broken half the time and works at the speed of a snail because his budget was too small. The bad boy Notary invests in a mega printer that spits out 40 pages per minute (on a bad minute) and never breaks, and also has a three year guarantee. When the bad boy Notary introduces his printer he says, and I quote, “check out this bad boy.”

3. The “nice” guy Notary neatly stacks the blank pages (if any) in the stack of loan documents. The bad boy Notary
makes spitballs out of the blank pages in the stack of loan documents, or makes paper airplanes. Japanese bad boys prefer to do origami with the blank pages and show off their Yakuza tattoos and explain the story of each tattoo. The bad boy notary could also play hang man with customers using blank pages (and even hang them if they lose.)

4. The “nice” guy Notary refuses to answer phone calls during the signing because he feels it might upset the client. The bad boy Notary realizes that he will miss his next job assignment as well as tomorrow’s job assignments if he misses phone calls, texts and emails, so he is watching them like a hawk. Moreover, he is concerned that his various lady friends might call while at the signing and he definitely doesn’t want to miss their calls.

5. The “nice” guy Notary explains to the borrower why page three on the 1003 is left blank and then gets funny looks. The bad boy Notary plays tic tac toe with the customer using page three of the 1003. Sounds kind of lame, but is a way to use the page that says, “this page intentionally left blank.”

6. The “nice” guy Notary invests big bucks going to all of the NNA conferences, learns some, and makes a handful of connections that he could have made by making a few phone calls. The bad boy Notary reads Jeremy’s blog and masters the materials in the free courses, gets a few mentors by networking with Jeremy, Carmen and the other more experienced people in the industry, AND, writes sarcastic and mildly inappropriate responses to Jeremy’s blogs… (hmmm, sounds like Ken.)

7. The “nice” guy Notary let’s his customers rack up a huge bill without complaining. After all, he is afraid that they will stop sending business his way. The bad boy Notary has a credit limit with customers which he expects them to honor. If the don’t he will cancel a job at the last minute and send a text saying, “Paypal what you owe me or find another Notary, punk!” Ouch! Once again, sounds a little like Ken, except Ken asks to be paid up front as a standard business practice. I wonder if Ken wears a leather jacket? Ken also doesn’t call people punks… he calls them turkeys instead. (gobble gobble.)

8. The “nice” guy Notary wants to attracts any client he can and is afraid to lose any client. The bad boy Notary realizes that there are some people with more time than money, and others with more money and less time — he prefers the latter and charges them appropriately. If the client is not in a position to pay big and pay fast, bad boy Notary doesn’t have a use for them.

9. The “nice” guy Notary carries pepper spray in the car just in case. Better safe than sorry. The bad boy Notary carries pepper spray in the car, on his person, a gun, has a knife collection and a club. After all, you never know what is coming. Additionally, bad boy Notary always sits closest to the door not because he is afraid — he is just thinking ahead of the game just in case something happens. You always have to have an escape plan.

10. The “nice” guy Notary always brags that he knows what he is doing and talks endlessly about his “experience.” The bad boy Notary is certified five times over and keeps his cool when talking to clients. He answers questions the way they were ask, and doesn’t try to insert little self-promoting statements into the conversation when unnecessary. He figures if someone wants to know about his background in Escrow or the 10,000 loans he signed (or claims to have signed) they will ask. He plays it cool and gets the job, because he is very professional and not at all annoying contrary to the “nice” Notary who falls on his face trying to do a snow job or smoke screen.

So, there you have it. Nice guys finish last not because they are nice, but because they are lame and unprepared, not to mention stupid. Stay ahead of the game and be a bad boy Notary. But, perhaps without the Harley as that pointer is not that critical. However the Harley jacket has been scientifically proven to attract babes.

You might also like:

Are you a bad boy Notary?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22380

Ken’s take on how to be a bad boy-girl, person, Notary
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22374

Share
>

August 7, 2019

What consitutes a “bad boy” notary part 2

Filed under: Ken Edelstein — admin @ 9:10 pm

11. The bad boy Notary shacks up with the bad girl Notary and produces seven signing services. The “nice guy” Notary marries a Judge and has little problem collecting his rightful fees.

12. Many attributes affect how the bad boy Notary deals with clients and tasks, basically hate is given to everyone – including himself. The “nice guy Notary” sees everyone as simply human and does his best to be respectful to all; with perfect manners.

13. The bad boy Notary does not bother to flush after using the borrowers toilet. The “nice guy” Notary relieved himself at a restaurant on the way to the borrower.

14 The “nice guy” Notary wants his client to have a work product that will meet the client needs. The bad boy notary only wants to leave as quickly as possible with as much money as possible – including short changing when possible.

15. The “nice guy” Notary is careful when fingerprinting to avoid brushing against the body of both male and female clients. The “bad boy” Notary, with a perpetual erection; “accidently” but repeatedly makes contact in every way possible.

16. The “nice guy” Notary that requires payment in advance mentions that requirement during “first contact”. The bad boy Notary runs down the clock of the caller (so they have little time to find an alternative) and demands PayPal payment only after the doc is received, or an hour to the job – whichever is less.

17. The nice guy Notary carries a handkerchief for nose blowing. The “bad boy” Notary picks his nose constantly and “flicks” boogers on the borrower carpet; exclaiming “it’s good for the rug”.

18. The bad boy Notary stepped in poo on the way – and figures the rug in the borrower house will clean his shoes. The “nice guy” Notary is careful where walking, and makes sure shoes are clean prior to entering all locations.

19. The bad boy Notary spreads his current affliction (flu, measles, lice, etc.) in pursuit of making a buck. The “good guy” notary does not accept work until he is free of contagious issues.

20. The “nice guy” Notary has a set schedule of fees, with some variation for early morning or distant travel, etc. The bad boy Notary bases his fee on the desperate tone of the caller or the wealth implied by their home address.

So, now we know some of the differences between a nice guy notary and a bad boy Notary. The question is, what can you learn from the bad boy Notary? Please write some comments if there are any other bad boy lessons you can teach us which I neglected to mention.

You might also like:

Ken’s take on how to be a bad boy Notary
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22374

Stormy Daniels accuses Notary of having sex with her
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20485

More on bad boy Notaries
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22560

Share
>

August 6, 2019

I Bounced Trustee signing – Refunded – 15 Min after docs arrived

Filed under: Ken Edelstein — admin @ 9:08 pm

I Bounced Trustee signing – Refunded – 15 Min after docs arrived
I asked the all purpose question – Is there anything else I will be asked to do other than print, go, legally notarize, ship, report completion. They said “that’s it”. They sent my standard PayPal fee in 5 minutes.

When the doc arrived there was a requirement to scan and email two of the pages; OK, I’ll live with it. Even though it requires finding a parking spot, scan, email, and back out to ship. But, as they paid so quickly – I just said to myself “such is life”. But, it gets worse, as usual with my telling a lot worse.

Postdate not Backdate.
Along with the scan and email was a statement from title that I could ignore the fact that the docs were dated for the day after the notarization was scheduled. That was on the Mortgage. Borrower was predated as (no changes) signing on the 5th, the witnesses (another surprise) date the actual 4th as do I. That sure would look strange. I check with American Society of Notaries – that’s prohibited. Strike One.

Notary notarize thy self
There were two documents for notary only signatures that called for venue, stamped and seal. The first had me swear to the validity of the attached borrower ID copy – also prohibited by ASN. The second asked me to “verify” that the correct person signed, again sworn by me. Strike Two.

The closing Affidavit
The borrower signed over the words “Minnie Mouse, Trustee” – but in the notary section after the before me was “Minnie Mouse, followed by a lengthy description of the trust details”. They did include a copy of the trust (to reassure me?). Thus I was providing the trust details that the affiant did not swear to! It was the same situation for several other documents. Strike Three.

Let me outta here
Fortunately they sent the docs on Tuesday, at 7PM with the task scheduled for Thursday at 3PM, about two days later. Of course nobody at title was there to answer the phone. How I wished I had asked for the person who gave me the assignment to provide their cell number. I sent emails only stating that I had issues with the documents and also processed a complete PayPal refund. I had not printed the docs as it is my custom to review the PDFs on screen to be sure I would be able to accept the task. I also sent screen images of the ASN site showing that the specifics mentioned above were prohibited notary functions.

Lessons Learned
During “first contact” I was given the choice of them emailing the doc to me or they would ship the package to the borrower. Always have the doc emailed to you – so you can take a look at it and not wind up in a situation where you must decline to proceed and also want a trip fee. That would make for everyone involved to be unhappy. Look carefully at those notary sections, they are your statement. The fact that they sent me the Trust is meaningless; the notarized document must be able to “stand on its own”. Years later if there is litigation would you have the Trust document? Has it been revoked? Are you qualified to determine if it is valid? I am only allowed in the notary section to have the name as on ID.

What to do
Run away from questionable jobs. Your defense attorney would cost you a lot more than the tiny notary fee. Don’t count on E&O to step in when your actions are clearly improper – Dump the illegal tasks!

You might also like:

Good Deed Bad Deed
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16285

The 123notary elite certification study guide
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20118

Share
>

July 23, 2019

My office or yours — the notary bar scene

Filed under: Humorous Posts — admin @ 4:50 am

I suggest against meeting Notaries in bars, and for simple reasons. Jeff once met a Notary at a bar, and the Notary took his interest the wrong way and asked, “My office or yours?” It’s easy for Notaries to get the wrong idea, especially if you meet them at the wrong place. That is why many people find Notaries using apps these days. You text them an offer, then they text you back hopefully within seconds and then you negotiate. My office or yours? That can affect the fee involved too.

But, if you meet a notary at their office, then they can’t ask, “My office or yours” since you are already at your office. Then, there are Notaries who like to wait for people at Starbucks. All I can say is, bring a good book, you’ll be reading it. Clients who go to Starbucks to get notarized typically keep the notary waiting around 25 to 45 minutes and you don’t get paid for that waiting time. If they pay in advanced by Paypal, you will at least get paid if they decide not to show up.

Another reason not to meet Notaries in bars is that they might do anything after they’ve had a few drinks. They might notarize an Affidavit without ID or spill tequila on your Warranty Deed after the Warranty has expired. So the moral of the story people is, if a Notary asks, “My office or yours,” You might consider shopping around for a more reliable sounding Notary, preferably not one whose prime was in the 70’s man!

You might also like:

A bar only for cool Notaries
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22546

Notary small talk at bars
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=21242

Bartender Notary – a reverse mortgage on the rocks
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=4080

Share
>

July 28, 2018

Shark Tank: A signing company wants to sell shares on Shark Tank

Filed under: Humorous Posts — Tags: — admin @ 12:40 am

CONTESTANT: Hello Sharks, my name is Dave and I want to sell 50% of my company on Shark Tank. We are a signing company that caters to nationwide title companies. We get Notaries around the country to do signings for us, and then keep them waiting forever to get paid to improve upon our cash flow. There is nothing new or innovative about our business practices. It is similar to most other signing companies.

Mr. WONDERFUL: I have a great idea. Since you take forever to pay people who have done work for you, I’ll buy 50% of your business and then take forever to pay you for it.

CONTESTANT: Oh, well, I’m not sure I like that idea.

LORI: If you don’t like being treated that way, don’t treat others that way. What comes around goes around.

CONTESTANT: Well, that’s just the way our industry works. I don’t always get paid on time by title either.

LORI: As I was saying, refer to my last statement.

Mr. WONDERFUL: It seems like you are participating more in the bad karma business than the signing business. Maybe you should change your business model.

MARK: Yeah, perhaps you should pay people a day before they do the work and then they can keep you waiting indefinitely to actually do the work. That is how it is hiring programmers.

CONTESTANT: Please don’t bring up the “p” word.

LORI: The “p” word? Programmers? Why? Did you pay them and then they didn’t do their work? That is a business model for most programming companies in the industry who cater to small clients. That’s why I get an air-tight contract before I hire a programmer to even write a single line of code.

BARBARA: Sounds like you need a better business model. I’m out by the way. But, if you consider paying people upon proof of having finished service by having them fax you a few pages of the work, that might be a reasonable system for having work done and paid for quickly.

CONTESTANT: Yeah. The problem is that if I pay the Notary before I get paid by Title, I might just be out the money.

LORI: That’s a cost of doing business. Pay the Notary whatever you can afford after you calculate the percentage chance that you won’t get paid. At least you will still have good Notaries working for you in this case.

CONTESTANT: Okay. I’m out.

Mr. WONDERFUL: You can’t be out. You’re the contestant. By the way I’m out.

CONTESTANT: Well, it sounds like I’m not going to get paid on time which is why I’m out.

LORI: We could paypal you the funds right away.

CONTESTANT: But, funds can be reversed and the policies are wishy-washy for non-tangibles.

LORI: But, I don’t want anything to do with your type of business model paying people late and not being innovative. Why not a more cutting edge business model where Title is forced to pay within 72 hours of you paying the notary or you either cut them as a client or raise their rates accordingly. You could have the whole pay structure as part of an automated system.

CONTESTANT: Snapdocs is the only intelligent business model these days. The rest of us use technology from the 90’s.

Mr. WONDERFUL: It’s time to get with the times. I’m out. Ooops. I said that already. Oh, running out of time speaking of time. It’s time for our next contestant.

You might also like:

Shark Tank – notarizing in the shower for executives
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20511

Shark Tank – Traffic freezer for Notaries
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20509

Share
>

June 12, 2018

They want a refund

Filed under: Ken Edelstein — admin @ 11:29 am

They Want A Refund
It’s a very routine start to the project. We agree on a time and a place. The document is sent to me via email and I am assured the affiant will be on site as scheduled with proper ID. It was a cold morning in Manhattan, wind chill about 25F, but the little Honda Civic cranked to life. Appointment was way downtown so I allocated an hour to reach the distant location. I had printed 3 sets of the document. One for the affiant to ship, one for affiant to keep, and a backup to recover from any mishap.

Arriving 15 minutes early, I take the elevator to the destination. There I am met by security that asks the purpose of my visit. Informing the guard that I am there to notarize a document for an employee, with whom I have an appointment. The response was something that truly surprised me. “We do not permit notarization on the premises”. “You will have to submit the document via registered letter to the legal department.”. Wow! I inform the guard that the notarization is for personal use by the employee and has nothing to do with their company. The guard calls legal and the edict stands!

It’s now 15 minutes past the scheduled time, and the affiant has not arrived. I call the person who gave me the assignment. I am informed that the affiant was delayed and would not be on site for “about an hour and a half”. Then the affiant calls and informs me that once “in the building, it would not be possible for us to leave and notarize at a different location”. Kind of reminds me of the old computer programming loop: Skip to Branch, Branch to Skip.

It’s now a half hour past appointment time, and the guard is telling me that I have no valid reason to remain on the premises. I know what that means; failure for me to leave puts me in position of being guilty of trespassing. Out I go, to call my “employer”. I do have another scheduled appointment and am unable to wait an additional hour, sayeth me. Can we receive a refund of the PayPal payment as you did not notarize the document – is the reply.

In a word no. I made the trip which took an hour in Manhattan morning traffic, and it will be the same for my return trip. You set the location, and assured me the affiant would be present as scheduled with proper ID. However, it is my policy to work with my clients. What I am willing to do is meet with your client, at a location close to me, anytime between 10AM and 10PM for no additional charge. I am not willing to return to this location for any reason as they do not allow me to notarize on their premises.

I put basically all of the above in an email, to document the events. Other than the affiant to be an hour and a half late, issues remain. Affiant can’t leave during working hours (odd?) and I can not return after being asked to leave. I’m also not willing to make another two hour round trip “on the house” in Manhattan traffic. All of this happened early today, it’s now at the close of business and no call to reschedule at the location near me.

There in NO option when/if I happen to be close by as affiant can’t come out and I can’t go in. I do wonder if it’s permissible to stop a Notary Public from performing requested duties in this manner. But am not willing to be arrested for trespassing and incur the expense of legal defense.

.

You might also like:

If the world ends, do I get a refund?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=621

Bouncey Bouncey Paypal
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=21046

My next notary visit is free
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19298

Share
>

April 15, 2018

A Job Declined

Filed under: Ken Edelstein — Tags: , — admin @ 11:20 am

A Job Declined
Are you available for a “simple” job late tonight? Up goes my alert status. The caller used two vague take advantage of the notary words. When they say the job is simple it generally has more strings attached to it than a cat with a ball of yarn. Also, late tonight can have many definitions. So I reply with my standard request to know the What, When and Where and if there are any other aspects that I should know about. I’m glad I asked.

The affiant is flying in to Newark airport, not too far from Manhattan. The flight is due to arrive at 2AM; stretching the late tonight a bit. Location is not too far at the southern tip of Manhattan. The document is a simple one page affidavit. Once signed, and when I return home, I am to scan and email. The original goes via FedEx to my client.

OK so far, I quote double my routine fee (for 2AM) and mention the need for exact shipping address with company name, zip code and phone number at destination. Great is the response, we will send you the document in a few minutes. Just a moment please, there is one more aspect to making this work for both of us. My fee, plus the estimated FedEx fee is payable at this time. Do you mean that you want to be paid in advance? Yes, there are many things that can go wrong with this type of assignment.

The plane can be delayed, as is often the case in Newark airport. The affiant my have ID that does not match the document. The affiant may choose to not sign the document. Also, you are asking me to send you an invoice for my fee plus the FedEx charges. Thus, you want me to incur all expenses and wait for your law firm to add me as a vendor and process payment. I do not work that way and neither does anybody else. I can’t even order a T shirt and have Sears send it to me with an invoice for me to pay after receiving it.

Don’t you lawyers insist upon a “retainer” prior to doing anything for your clients? Well, it’s the same for me. The reason that I require payment in advance is to put all “risk” on your side. If any of the problems I mentioned above occur and I am unable to complete the project I truly doubt that you would send me a check. I guarantee to do my part, but my actions rely upon the assurances that you have given to me regarding the assignment.

It is the policy of our firm to process an invoice only after the work has been completed and received, inspected and approved. Well it’s my policy to receive, especially for this early AM, no affiant contact job, my full fee in advance; including out of pocket FedEx charges. Thus, while I certainly do respect your business policies; they conflict with mine. I must decline to accept your assignment. There are many notaries in Manhattan and 123notary, where you found me, lists quite a few more. A few phone calls might find someone who will accept your terms.

If it is close by, during routine hours, and the caller sounds “right” – I go for cash. It’s nice to avoid the PayPal deductions. But when there are “unusual” aspects, I require payment up front. To protect my calendar my phrase is that I do not put the task on my calendar until payment is received; the time slot will be held for 15 minutes awaiting payment. When complex or unusual jobs fail, due to circumstances beyond my control – they never want to send a check for “efforts”.

.

You might also like:

When you can’t stamp
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=18930

The art of the decline
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=15783

Decline profitable junk work
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=15495

Share
>

March 16, 2018

Notary Marketing 102 — The Bottom of your Notes Section

Filed under: Loan Signing 101 — admin @ 7:43 am

Return to Notary Marketing 102 Notes Tutorial

.

This article continues the discussion of what goes in your notes section on your 123notary profile. The following content covers what goes in the lower-middle or bottom of your notes:

.

4. Coverage Areas and Special Terms
The lower middle of your notes can talk about what counties or cities you serve. I do not like lists of zip codes, but if you insist you can include them. Listing a radius is fine, but back it up with mention of specific counties or parts of counties so the public will have a clear idea of where you go. Clear information wins the game and vague self-descriptions looks sloppy. If you take credit cards, Square or Paypal, mention that too. Here is an itemization of what to put here:

Areas Covered — A radius in miles and the names of counties or parts of counties are most effective. You might list specific city names too. Keep county lists as county lists and it is confusing to mix cities and counties together. Format is important, so if you ramble on and on about how you sometimes go to Northeast Butler County, but only if it is not raining and not after 8pm except if it is during the summer, that is too complicated.

Credit Cards — If you take square, paypal, or credit cards, mention that here.

Online Booking — If you have some fancy technological system or do online booking, mention that here.

.

5. Closing Phrases
Finish off your notes with a catchy closing phrase. Call today! Satisfaction Guaranteed. I look forward to working with you.

.

6. Other
Please make sure the general fields in your listing are all filled out. 123notary has many fields to fill out and it is common for Notaries to swear to me that they filled everything out when most fields were left blank. Fill in your number of signings, hours, specialties, etc. The additional information area has room for a lot more information about hospital signings, immigration documents, and more.

.

LINK: Excerpts from great notes sections
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=13613

LINK: Your jumbled or too short notes section is costing you 50% of your business!
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16572

.

Share
>
Older Posts »