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March 23, 2019

To do well with a high placed listing, you need 6000 loans signed

If you want to purchase a high placed listing, I recommend it. However, to do well, you need experience, good communication skills, reviews, and knowledge. In short, you need a package of skills to do well on our directory. But, how much experience do you need?

In my opinion which may or may not add up in today’s world, your knowledge takes precedent over your experience. I would rather hire someone with 500 loans signed who can answer my hardest questions. Someone with 20000 loans signed who knows nothing and has been winging it all these years is less valuable because I think they are incompetent. I do not hire notaries, but those that do have their own standards. they want experience, but when I ask them “how much” experience, the answers are very wishy-washy. Generally people ask for two years of experience. But, when I interview Notaries with two years of experience they often have not signed a single loans.

Expressing experience in terms of loans signed is better than years in my opinion because it is a more accurate reflection of what you have actually done. However, people lie on their number of loans, or fail to update their number for years on end which leads to inaccurate information.

What I learned crunching numbers is that the Notaries who do well in high spots on our site typically have a median of about 6000 loans signed. 6000 real loans, not a fake number you input into your profile when you login. I am assuming that our # of loan data is roughly true for the most part although there are always liars.

This is not to say that those with less loans will not do well with a high spot. But, if you have less experience, you need to compensate for that by doing a lot of studying. Test results matter more for newer Notaries than for more experienced Notaries on our site according to my number crunching. Notary Public 101 is a nice course on our blog where you can learn the basics of Notary procedure, acts, vocabulary, real life scenarios, and loan documents. It is a very popular course and comes highly recommended.

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Your # of loans signed just went down?
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June 4, 2018

Notes — how many financial packages do you mention?

Filed under: Your Notes Section — admin @ 11:56 am

In your notary notes section it makes sense to discuss your experience. Many Notaries have a wide repetoire of types of signings they know how to do. It is common to make a list of financial packages or types of documents that you are familiar with. But, how many should you mention? Should they be in alphabetical order?

My philosophy is that you should not mention more than twelve types of documents or loans in one paragraph. It just gets to be too much. On the other hand, some Notaries who have 5000 loans signed, only mention four or five types of loans which is not enough. I think that nine to twelve is the perfect number.

Additionally, I prefer to put the more unusual types of loans first in the list to stand out. But alphabetical is easier to read. On the other hand Refinances, FHA, and VA are all types of refinances. Should they be grouped together. I guess there is no right answer, but you should have a strategy for what you are doing.

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What types of loans do you know how to sign?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16712

# of loans vs. # of years or using “since.”
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19270

How to write a notes section if you are a beginner
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16698

A list of things you probably forgot to put in your notes section
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22303

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March 31, 2018

Who is the authority at a Notary Loan Signing?

Notary Public Authority

We often ask questions about authority to signing agents, and the results are horrifying. Most Notaries do not know who is in charge of what. So, this article will sum it up clearly.

Notary Public
A Notary Public is a state appointed state official who is paid by customers, but whose “boss” or authority is the state Notary division. Many Notaries Public seem to be confused as to who their boss is, the one paying them or the one commissioning them. The problem is further complicated by the fact that the ones paying them often pay them for more than just Notary services as travel, pick up, drop off, and supervision of non-notarized signatures and packages seem to be part of the deal if you are a Signing Agent.

The Notary is the sole authority regarding what goes in a Notary certificate such as an Acknowledgment, Jurat, etc., what goes in the journal, what is allowed or not allowed, and how a notarization should be done.

It is common that Notaries have questions during a loan signing and direct those questions to the Lender or Title representative. This is okay for Title or Lending questions, but not for Notary questions where the Notary may only turn for help to their state Notary division, official Notary handbook, or perhaps the NNA hotline.

Notaries should NOT ask the Lender for Notary advice because:
1. The Lender is probably not a Notary
2. If the Lender is a Notary they might be in a different state
3. If the Lender is a Notary and in the same state they might not be knowledgeable.
4. If the Lender is a Notary, in the same state, and knowledgeable, they might (are likely to) give you advice that would make the job go more smoothly for them, yet have tremendous liability for you.
5. You are the one appointed to the job, so even if the person you are asking for advice is a Notary, they are not the one whose commission number gets put on the certificate, and you are the one going to jail if something goes wrong. Therefor, you have to know your laws and what you can and cannot do, etc.

Who can initial and where?
Any initials on a Notary certificate are done exclusively by the Notary Public. It looks like tampering if the borrower or anyone else makes marks on a Notary certificate. The borrower may initial documents, but not the Notary certificate or Notary section in or attached to a notarized document

The Lender
The Lender is the “boss” of what happens with loan documents. If the Lender authorizes a change, initialing, cross outs, etc., on an actual loan document that is NOT in the notary section, that is up to them and they are the authority on that matter, not the Notary. The minute the issue becomes with a Notary certificate, then the authority swings over to the Notary (even if the Notary doesn’t have a clue what to do.)

The Title Officer
The appointed Title company might be a good source of information about how to handle any issues that might come up with Title documents or recorded documents. You can ask them if you have questions, but don’t let them answer Notary questions.

Issues of Preference can be asked to the Lender
Sometimes there is more than one legal way to handle a situation. If there is an error on a preprinted Acknowledgment, and your state allows a choice of crossing out & initialing vs. using a fresh Acknowledgment form, you have a choice. The Notary has the right to make that choice on his/her own and choose the option that he/she feels is more prudent or ask the Lender. However, this is a situation where the Notary can ask the Lender not for advice, but for preference. If the Lender would prefer a loose Acknowledgment stapled on to the document rather than crossing out & initialing the original form, the Notary can proceed accordingly.

The Borrower
The borrower has the right to sign, not sign, tell you where to park and more. Their preferences matter as well.

Your State
Your state Notary division decides what the laws are in your state, how they are explained or document in your official Notary handbook, etc. They are your boss, so you do whatever they say. Additionally, if you are weak on your Notary knowledge, that can lead to ending up in court as a witness, having your commission revoked, suspended or terminated. Additionally, it is possible to be convicted of a crime if you are thought to be involved in property related fraud, or if you filled out a form stating that an Oath was taken when in fact it was never taken which is a daily fraud that most Notaries engage in that is unacceptable.
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Does 123notary have the authority to quiz people?
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Do you keep a journal to please your state, a judge, the FBI or 123notary?
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13 ways to get sued as a Notary
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December 1, 2011

Can a Georgia notary notarize a Florida property document?

Can a Georgia notary notarize a Florida property document?

Loan signings are common across the United States.  Any notary in any state can notarize almost any document within the confines of their state, but the document can be from out of state, or out of the country.  Notaries should refrain from notarizing copies of vital records, and Wills are generally avoided in many states as well.  Just as long as a Georgia Notary has their two feet in Georgia, it is okay to notarize a Florida document, or a loan signing for a property in Florida. 
 
Non-attorney Georgia Notaries are prohibited from doing loan signings for properties in Georgia, but, I don’t know any restriction for them as far as notarizing loan documents (packages that generally include Deeds of Trust, Mortgages, Grant Deeds, Quit Claim Deeds, Notes, Notice of Right to Cancel, etc.) that are from Florida, or some other state.
 
A Florida notary can also notarize documents that are to be recorded out of state.
 
One critical piece of information is that the county recorder in the state that a document is going to be recorded — have standards.  They might insist on their state’s notary wording to be on the notary certificate.  They can reject a document if the notary wording is not up to their standards, or if there is a smudgy seal, etc.  That is the job of the person who prepares the documents, and not the responsibility of the notary. A Georgia notary public, or any notary for that matter is allowed to make legal decisions for their clients which includes what type of wording to use, document drafting, or choosing the type of notarization to do, i.e. acknowledgment, jurat, protest, etc.

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November 20, 2011

The Notary Signing Agent Loan Signing Process & Pitfalls

The Notary Signing Agent “Loan Closing” – Process, Preparation & Pitfalls

Perhaps it would be best to cover the events, from the desire for a mortgage, or re-finance, to funding; chronologically, as the timeline is the only common aspect. The borrower completes a Loan Application (more on the importance of this later), and numerous other documents. These are usually signed at the location of the Lending Institution (bank), in the presence of the Loan Officer (LO). Once approved by the bank, the processing becomes very interesting indeed.

The LO’s bank will lend money to the borrower based on the Mortgage as collateral for the loan. Banks do not like to take any risk whatsoever. What if the borrower does not have “clear title” to the property? To protect the bank, the bank requires the borrower to pay for “Title Insurance” issued by a “Title Co.”. So the next step is for the LO to contact a Title Co. to arrange for the insurance. Note that from this point forward the Title Co. “calls the shots”; as the Title Co. is the only party taking “risk”. If they do not issue the necessary insurance, there is no loan.

Eventually, after the loan has been approved, and the Title Insurance has been approved – usually about 2-3 weeks after the Loan Application; the stage is set for the actual processing of the paperwork. Various documents must be notarized, and it is the role of the Notary Public to check the ID’s of affiants on notarized documents; and there will be many! The mortgage is always notarized; and frequently two copies are processed; in case the messenger sent to record the mortgage at the local county clerk’s office loses it on the way. That actually does happen.

At this point the documents, typically from 80 to 125 pages are computer generated and ready for the Notary Signing Agent to bring to the borrower. But first a qualified NSA must be selected. As it is the Title Co. who is most interested in proper completion of the paperwork, they take on a leadership role to get the documents signed by the borrowers. But, not wanting to actually deal with, or have to select notaries, they often use a Signing Service (SS) to actually choose the notary.

At this point the Signing Agent gets a call asking if they are available to be at so and so location at such and such a time. If not, they call the next agent on their list. If it works for the agent’s schedule, they negotiate a fee. That fee is based on the requirements to process the Loan
Package. Variables include the number of pages, the distance to the borrower, time of day (extra for me to be there at 7AM on Sunday), etc. Also discussed are how and when the package is to be sent to the Signing Agent – overnight, usually via FedEx or E-mail. The latter
has usually has an additional fee. Once an agreement is reached, the Signing Service, on behalf of the Title Company sends a “work order” to the Signing Agent.

Now the ball is in the Notary Signing Agent’s court. Everyone who did anything prior to this point is depending on the NSA to get the borrower’s signatures and initials completely, and to do the requisite notarizations accurately. The NSA must also make sure any “non borrowing spouse” is present to sign docs as required by state law. There is much for the NSA to do. First the borrower must be called to confirm the “work order” as to contact information and address and to verify the scheduled time of meeting; and that all will bring proper ID to the table. Next, the NSA must receive and print two sets of the loan documents (borrower copy and bank copy). A good NSA will explain what will take place at the “signing” and remind the borrower to have their photo ID (and a copy to submit) ready for the meeting. A really good NSA will ask the borrower what name is on their ID, as the property “vesting” name sometimes differs from the name on the borrower’s ID. If so, the NSA contacts the Signing Service to get the documents corrected, or the borrower finds appropriate ID matching the documents.

Finally, usually with barely enough time to print and drive; the E-document is received and two sets printed. If there is adequate time after printing, some NSA’s like to pre-notarize the documents so they are able to devote their full attention to the signing process. Map in hand, GPS programmed, hoping the traffic is light; the NSA departs for the scheduled meeting with the borrower. A good NSA always uses a GPS to find the borrower’s location and does not get lost in the process. After dark jobs usually require a powerful flashlight to see house numbers in
residential neighborhoods.

The NSA shows their ID and requests the ID of the borrower(s). Then, the page by page completion of the documents begins. A single flaw, omission, or unreadable date (usually by the borrower) will often result in a complete re-draw of everything. The experienced NSA knows to “swap a page” from the borrower’s copy to allow a redo of a page with an error. The process usually takes about an hour, depending on the size of the Loan Package, how much the borrower wishes to read, and the amount of information to be entered. Often the borrower has questions and “attempts” to contact the LO. If, as is sometimes the case; the borrower receives the package directly, days prior to the Notaries arrival; they are expected to read it and ask their LO any questions. But, some borrowers want to ask questions of the Notary Signing Agent.

Title Co.’s and Signing Services tell the NSA to “explain the documents, but do not give legal advice”. It’s a really fine line between the two. Most NSA’s choose the side of caution and only define terms and assist the borrower to find documents with desired information (the interest
rate, the APR, the pre-payment penalty). At this time, the computer generated replacement for the original hand written Loan Application is signed. This is one of the most important documents. It is on this document that the borrower has made claims about their credit
worthiness, salary, etc. Any false statement on this document would allow the Lending Institution to demand the loan be paid in full immediately! Also, many of the numbers on this document will be wrong – because time has passed since it was originally signed – some debts
shown will be higher or lower.

Having been on several thousand signings the environmental aspects of the borrower’s premises are worthy of comment. They range from a well lit kitchen table in an air-conditioned room – to, and I am not making this up – a fruit fly infested room where the borrower pursues his
hobby of “naturally” raising Iguanas! There are many other pitfalls. In New York, the Notary is mandated to only use black ink; but Pinellas County, Florida will not record a mortgage unless all signatures are in blue ink! I have been asked several times (verbally, of course),
to “backdate” my notarization date, as the papers have expired (borrower out of town, rate lock expired, etc.). In New York that is called Forgery, a class D Felony – worthy of seven years in prison!

Finally the documents are signed and notarized, the borrower given the Notary Oath – and it’s off to FedEx to ship the documents to the Title Company. Well, not exactly. First somedocuments must be faxed, (lots of them if it will fund same day); and an airbill very carefully
prepared. Phone calls must be made to report success or failure “at the table”, and an invoice prepared. At last all is ready and the papers are handed off to FedEx.

Although the borrower thinks the “closing” has been completed – it actually has not even started. If I was a true “closing agent” – I would have a checkbook and be able to write the check on the spot. It used to be done that way many years ago. Now, the papers are received by the Title
Company and they review them for errors. If their included documents, often called “junk docs” (because they tend to be 4th generation Xerox copies), are completed and notarized correctly they approve issuance of the Title Insurance and pass the paperwork to the Lending Institution. At that time the papers are again reviewed, this time the review is for the papers that originated from the bank. The bank, with the knowledge of Title Insurance approval; will at last do the real “Closing” – which allows for issuance of the check that the borrower has been seeking.

Thus, the Notary Signing Agent is an integral part of the process. Important documents are notarized to assure the validity of the signatures. No system is perfect. A notary can be fooled with a good forgery. So can a State Trooper, with a phony Driver’s License. But, the bulk of the
impersonation potential is filtered at the source by the NSA’s diligence in pursuing valid ID and using their stamp and embosser on documents. Borrowers like to sign papers in the comfort of their own home/office – at their convenience. The licensed and professional notary, though a part of the system that caused the recent mortgage “melt down” disaster; was never a causative factor. If not for the diligence of professional notaries pursuing the NSA craft, things would have been much, much worse.

http://kenneth-a-edelstein.com

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June 20, 2015

Un-TIL they make the change! — CFPB’s New Mortgage Disclosure Rule

Filed under: Technical & Legal — Tags: , , , — admin @ 10:22 am

Know Before You Owe!
“The CFPB will be issuing a proposed amendment to delay the effective date of the Know Before You Owe rule until October 1, 2015.”
You can owe without knowing for the time being!

Currently, loan document packages include a Truth in Lending and often a Good Faith Estimate. The problem is that these documents are confusing. The Good Faith Estimate, TIL and HUD-1 have overlapping information and it is often hard to know which document has the final information unless you are a seasoned Notary.

The New Document will be Called “The Loan Estimate.”
This document will cover the loan amount, interest rate, monthly principal & interest, prepayment penalty info, balloon payment info, estimated monthly payments, tax, insurance, closing costs, and more.
http://files.consumerfinance.gov/f/201311_cfpb_kbyo_loan-estimate.pdf

The APR Revisited
In addition to starting the APR on page three, there will be yet another figure to make Notaries crazy called the TIP which is the Total Interest Percentage which reflects the total amount of interest you will pay over the life of the loan as a percentage of the loan amount.

Other Considerations
Late payment fees, servicing, assumption, and appraisal costs will also be covered in this new and exciting document.

Is Change Good?
Honestly, this new document is somewhat of a combination of the HUD-1 and the TIL with some elaborations and improvements. I believe it is not necessary to create a new name for a document. In my opinion, this information would be better off added to existing documents so that Notaries and borrowers don’t get any more confused than they already are.

What Do Notaries Think?
Deb on LinkedIn feels that this new document will make life simpler.
Wendell on LinkedIn feels that the new forms are not any more complicated than the forms they replace.
Linda on LinkedIn feels the new forms will help Notaries as borrowers will have the chance to look the form over and learn the facts before the signing.
Kelly states that there will be a complete process change for loans in the industry and it will be more than just one new form.
https://www.linkedin.com/grp/post/4139192-6014441719272067073?trk=groups-post-b-all-cmnts

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TRID information courtesy of Carmen
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March 1, 2015

Point (5) HUD (6) Occupancy (7) Deeds; The Value Menu BACKUP checked

I get paid enough to get something on the Value Menu

His name was Chester. He had been a Notary for years and he had seen it all. People liked hiring Chester, because he was on time, knowledgeable, and had quite a sense of humor. Unfortunately, a good sense of humor can be like a double edged sword. Not everyone will like your jokes. Chester was good at introducing the documents, and answering all questions.

CHESTER: Hi, my name is Chester. I’m going to be your Notary Signing Agent today. I am here to supervise the signing of these documents. If you have general questions about the documents, or what information is in which document, I am happy to answer. However, if you have specific questions pertaining to your loan, I will most likely refer those questions to your Lender.

ELLEN: Got it.

(ring-ring)

ELLEN: Hello? You want to speak to the man of the house? You must have the wrong number!

CHESTER: Let’s open the package here. Okay, this is the Deed of Trust. This document includes a property address, the amount of the loan, and ties your property as collateral for the loan. Additionally, it states the expiration date of the loan in 2045.

ELLEN: Right after the war of 2045. How convenient. I heard the war was going to end in June, and my loan expires right in July! Perfect! We’ll have two things to celibrate.

CHESTER: I didn’t know a war was scheduled.

ELLEN: Oh, that’s the new thing. Instead of going at it right away, people are so busy these days that they don’t have time for wars, unless they are scheduled at least twenty years in advance. I even have an app for that. It’s called — schedule my war. It has a D-day add-on too! Pretty cool. Looking forward to it.

CHESTER: And I thought that I was usually the funny one at signings. Now, this document is The Note. It has your payment amounts, if there is a prepayment penalty it will discuss that, and it has your Rate, and the amount of the loan.

ELLEN: My rate? My rate is by the word. Yeah. I charge by the word when I write material. But, my manager says that I should charge by the laugh. I get one rate for my initial time telling the jokes and then residuals. We do that at clubs too. Instead of a $30 cover charge, we have a laughometer strapped to each person. We charge them based on how many times they laughed and how hard they laughed. One guy had to Mortgage his house to pay his bill the last time I was on stage. Oh! Only 4.5% Cool! I won’t have to Mortgage my house to pay that. Did I say that? Oh — I AM Mortgaging my house and as a result will have to pay that. Got it!

Chester’s signing with Ellen went well. She would have appreciated his jokes if she hadn’t kept him laughing with her own jokes. But, Chester’s next signing didn’t work as well. The problem happened when he got to the HUD.

SAM: And who did you say you worked for again? You’re a subcontractor, right?

CHESTER: I subcontract for H&B Lending, over $40 billion served (lended)

SAM: I’m loving it! Don’t I deserve a break today?

CHESTER: Give ME a break, that ad is 40 years old! And this next document is the HUD. The HUD itemizes all of the expenses related to your loan.

SAM: Let me read that. Hmmm. On this line it says that the Notary fee is $250. How much of that do you get?

CHESTER: Oh, enough to get something on the value menu at McDonalds.

SAM: Okay, that’s not funny. Get out of my house! You damn Notary!

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Point (5) The HUD Settlement Statement
This document is often faxed or emailed at the last minute as Lenders often do not have their act together and need to make last minute changes to documents. Without the HUD, the loan cannot close.

The Settlement Statement or HUD contains information about fees and payoffs. Here, you can check to see what the Notary fee is and compare that to what you are being paid. Do not discuss these numbers with the borrower because it is between them and the Lender, and they are both relying on you for confidentiality. If the borrower already paid an appraisal fee out of their pocket and they are being charged again, for example, have them talk it over with the Lender. Don’t try to answer whether or not they will be reimbursed for certain fees; just have them speak to the Lender. If the Lender is not available, let them know that they have several days to talk to the Lender while they have the right to rescission (the right to cancel). The above situation with appraisal fees happens frequently.

There are several other documents that are similar to the HUD such: as the “Estimated Closing Statement” and the “Good Faith Estimate”. These documents were often drafted earlier in the loan process and don’t always reflect final numbers.

Seasoned Notaries often know what piece of information is on each line of the HUD and have the structure of the document memorized.

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Point (6) The Occupancy Affidavit

There are different variations to this document; sometimes it is called ‘Occupancy Affidavit and Financial Status’. The purpose of this document is for the borrower to state that they live in the subject property (which means the house they are borrowing money on). In addition, it asks the borrower to state that they haven’t had any sudden financial changes — for example, unemployment or bankruptcy. Keep your eyes open; if you don’t check which variation of the Occupancy Affidavit you are dealing with, you might make a fool of yourself (a fool and his money are soon parted.) This document is usually notarized.

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Point (7) Grant & Quitclaim Deeds

There are four major reasons to have a Grant Deed.

(1) To transfer property in a sale of property

(2) To take someone’s name off of a deed so they won’t be liable for a loan when the other owners want to borrow money.

(3) To transfer the property to or from community property in a trust.

(4) To change someone’s name on the deed
The deed could transfer a property from “Jane F. Doe” to “Jane Doe”. This is very common for people with name variations because sometimes a loan can’t fund without the property being recorded as being owned by the owner with a particular name variation.

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Quitclaim Deeds

Quitclaim Deeds are often used to take a person’s name off title. Here is some more information:

A Quitclaim Deed is a legal document which transfers a property to the buyer or owner, whatever interests in the property are held by the maker of the deed. A Quitclaim Deed does not guarantee that those interests are valid. By accepting such a deed, you accept the risk that someone may later appear with a valid claim to your property. A Grant Deed on the other hand guarantees from grantor to grantee that the title is clear. An example of a circumstance where a Quitclaim may be used is where one spouse is disclaiming any interest in property that the other spouse owns. Of the different types of deeds, the Quitclaim has the least assurance that the grantee receiving it will actually get any rights. A Quitclaim deed does not release the party quitting claim to real property from their obligations in any mortgage or other lien secured against the pertaining property.

A Quitclaim Deed is a common, but not standard document in a loan document package. Sometimes, ownership has to be transferred or someone needs to be taken off a Deed before a loan can officially go through. Quitclaim Deeds are always notarized using an Acknowledged signature and the signer must always be positively identified by the notary public for security purposes. Some states also require the notary to take fingerprints in their notary journal for Quitclaim and other deeds affecting real property.

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HUD-1 Settlement Statement
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I go over the HUD-1 First
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The Affidavit of Occupancy
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=10193

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July 5, 2013

Notarizing a Name Affidavit

Most loan document packages include a name affidavit which could also be called a Signature Affidavit and AKA Statement. There are many variations for what this document is called.

Or, should I say that there are many NAME variations for what this document is called?

In any case, this document is notarized the same way that any other notarized document is notarized, EXCEPT, that the signer is signing more than once.

In the notary verbiage, there will be the word name(s) and signature(s) — typically, for a notarization of a single individual, the (s) will be crossed on in both cases. But, on the Signature Affidavit and AKA Statement, the (s)’s should NOT be crossed out as a single person will have multiple name variations, and multiple signatures — one signature per name.

If the signer is a jazz musician, then the Signature Affidavit and AKA Statement might get really long with all of the name variations.

Here is a sample of some of the interior notary verbiage in a California Notary Acknowledgment Certificate Form..

….. On _________ before me, ________________________________________,
(name of notary public )
personally appeared _____________________________________________
who proved to me on the basis of satisfactory evidence to be the person(s) whose name(s) is/are subscribed to the within instrument and who acknowledged to me that he/she/they executed the same in their authorized capacity(ies), and by his/her/their signature(s) on the instrument the person(s), or entity upon behalf of which the person(s) acted, executed the instrument….

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The signature name affidavit – what it is an its purpose
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January 1, 2013

Signature Name Affidavit: Not a substitute for an ID

I hate to beat a dead horse. But it seems that quite a few of you still believe that the ‘Name affidavit‘ is a way to identify individuals that don’t have the proper ID. I’ll say it again for the thousandth time. You cannot use this form in place of current GOVERNMENT ID. The whole point of your job is to have the person appear before you and identify the signer through proper (current) government issued identification. There are usually no exceptions to this rule (except for one; when you feel that they will not be able to get ID. They then will need to be identified through credible witnesses (usually two) who will swear under oath to you, to the signers identity and they will have current government issued ID themselves. However, keep in mind that we do not usually use this method with loans. For some lenders this may be acceptable way to identify their borrowers but for many of us notaries in certain states it is prohibited. But under no circumstance no matter what state you hold your commission in are you to use the name/signature affidavit to ID anyone. NEVER!

So you may ask what is the form for? The name affidavit form is included in the loan document package to identify all the names of the borrower that have been reported to the credit bureaus and that appear on the individuals credit report. It is not for your use and dont let ANYONE tell you that it is used for any other purpose. It is to make the borrower aware that these are the names that the report has listed for them. These may include but not limited to married, and /or maiden names and/or their name has been misspelled.

So in closing, remember when you confirm a job make sure that all signers have proper identification and that the ID is government issued and is current. If you make sure of this when you call and confirm the assignment this will save you and your borrower allot of headaches.

Until next time! Be safe!

You might also like:

When ID and Documents have different names
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=230

Glossary: Signature Affidavit and AKA Statement
http://www.123notary.com/glossary/?signature-affidavit-and-aka-statement

Can a notary sign an out of state quit claim deed?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=2182

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November 30, -0001

Point (5) HUD (6) Occupancy (7) Deeds; The Value Menu

Filed under: Loan Signing 101 — Tags: — admin @ 12:00 am

I get paid enough to get something on the Value Menu

His name was Chester. He had been a Notary for years and he had seen it all. People liked hiring Chester, because he was on time, knowledgeable, and had quite a sense of humor. Unfortunately, a good sense of humor can be like a double edged sword. Not everyone will like your jokes. Chester was good at introducing the documents, and answering all questions.

CHESTER: Hi, my name is Chester. I’m going to be your Notary Signing Agent today. I am here to supervise the signing of these documents. If you have general questions about the documents, or what information is in which document, I am happy to answer. However, if you have specific questions pertaining to your loan, I will most likely refer those questions to your Lender.

ELLEN: Got it.

(ring-ring)

ELLEN: Hello? You want to speak to the man of the house? You must have the wrong number!

CHESTER: Let’s open the package here. Okay, this is the Deed of Trust. This document includes a property address, the amount of the loan, and ties your property as collateral for the loan. Additionally, it states the expiration date of the loan in 2045.

ELLEN: Right after the war of 2045. How convenient. I heard the war was going to end in June, and my loan expires right in July! Perfect! We’ll have two things to celibrate.

CHESTER: I didn’t know a war was scheduled.

ELLEN: Oh, that’s the new thing. Instead of going at it right away, people are so busy these days that they don’t have time for wars, unless they are scheduled at least twenty years in advance. I even have an app for that. It’s called — schedule my war. It has a D-day add-on too! Pretty cool. Looking forward to it.

CHESTER: And I thought that I was usually the funny one at signings. Now, this document is The Note. It has your payment amounts, if there is a prepayment penalty it will discuss that, and it has your Rate, and the amount of the loan.

ELLEN: My rate? My rate is by the word. Yeah. I charge by the word when I write material. But, my manager says that I should charge by the laugh. I get one rate for my initial time telling the jokes and then residuals. We do that at clubs too. Instead of a $30 cover charge, we have a laughometer strapped to each person. We charge them based on how many times they laughed and how hard they laughed. One guy had to Mortgage his house to pay his bill the last time I was on stage. Oh! Only 4.5% Cool! I won’t have to Mortgage my house to pay that. Did I say that? Oh — I AM Mortgaging my house and as a result will have to pay that. Got it!

Chester’s signing with Ellen went well. She would have appreciated his jokes if she hadn’t kept him laughing with her own jokes. But, Chester’s next signing didn’t work as well. The problem happened when he got to the HUD.

SAM: And who did you say you worked for again? You’re a subcontractor, right?

CHESTER: I subcontract for H&B Lending, over $40 billion served (lended)

SAM: I’m loving it! Don’t I deserve a break today?

CHESTER: Give ME a break, that ad is 40 years old! And this next document is the HUD. The HUD itemizes all of the expenses related to your loan.

SAM: Let me read that. Hmmm. On this line it says that the Notary fee is $250. How much of that do you get?

CHESTER: Oh, enough to get something on the value menu at McDonalds.

SAM: Okay, that’s not funny. Get out of my house! You damn Notary!

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Point (5) The HUD Settlement Statement
This document is often faxed or emailed at the last minute as Lenders often do not have their act together and need to make last minute changes to documents. Without the HUD, the loan cannot close.

The Settlement Statement or HUD contains information about fees and payoffs. Here, you can check to see what the Notary fee is and compare that to what you are being paid. Do not discuss these numbers with the borrower because it is between them and the Lender, and they are both relying on you for confidentiality. If the borrower already paid an appraisal fee out of their pocket and they are being charged again, for example, have them talk it over with the Lender. Don’t try to answer whether or not they will be reimbursed for certain fees; just have them speak to the Lender. If the Lender is not available, let them know that they have several days to talk to the Lender while they have the right to rescission (the right to cancel). The above situation with appraisal fees happens frequently.

There are several other documents that are similar to the HUD such: as the “Estimated Closing Statement” and the “Good Faith Estimate”. These documents were often drafted earlier in the loan process and don’t always reflect final numbers.

Seasoned Notaries often know what piece of information is on each line of the HUD and have the structure of the document memorized.

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Point (6) The Occupancy Affidavit

There are different variations to this document; sometimes it is called ‘Occupancy Affidavit and Financial Status’. The purpose of this document is for the borrower to state that they live in the subject property (which means the house they are borrowing money on). In addition, it asks the borrower to state that they haven’t had any sudden financial changes — for example, unemployment or bankruptcy. Keep your eyes open; if you don’t check which variation of the Occupancy Affidavit you are dealing with, you might make a fool of yourself (a fool and his money are soon parted.) This document is usually notarized.

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Point (7) Grant & Quitclaim Deeds

There are four major reasons to have a Grant Deed.

(1) To transfer property in a sale of property

(2) To take someone’s name off of a deed so they won’t be liable for a loan when the other owners want to borrow money.

(3) To transfer the property to or from community property in a trust.

(4) To change someone’s name on the deed
The deed could transfer a property from “Jane F. Doe” to “Jane Doe”. This is very common for people with name variations because sometimes a loan can’t fund without the property being recorded as being owned by the owner with a particular name variation.

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Quitclaim Deeds

Quitclaim Deeds are often used to take a person’s name off title. Here is some more information:

A Quitclaim Deed is a legal document which transfers a property to the buyer or owner, whatever interests in the property are held by the maker of the deed. A Quitclaim Deed does not guarantee that those interests are valid. By accepting such a deed, you accept the risk that someone may later appear with a valid claim to your property. A Grant Deed on the other hand guarantees from grantor to grantee that the title is clear. An example of a circumstance where a Quitclaim may be used is where one spouse is disclaiming any interest in property that the other spouse owns. Of the different types of deeds, the Quitclaim has the least assurance that the grantee receiving it will actually get any rights. A Quitclaim deed does not release the party quitting claim to real property from their obligations in any mortgage or other lien secured against the pertaining property.

A Quitclaim Deed is a common, but not standard document in a loan document package. Sometimes, ownership has to be transferred or someone needs to be taken off a Deed before a loan can officially go through. Quitclaim Deeds are always notarized using an Acknowledged signature and the signer must always be positively identified by the notary public for security purposes. Some states also require the notary to take fingerprints in their notary journal for Quitclaim and other deeds affecting real property.

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