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March 16, 2019

Wells Fargo Power of Attorney Form

Filed under: Power of Attorney — admin @ 9:59 am

Please be informed that banking power of attorneys are complicated and have issues. For an accurate opinion or accurate guidance, you need to consult Wells Fargo as well as an Attorney.

Attorneys typically can draft up fancy Power of Attorney documents, often at great expense. Their guidance is irreplaceable. However, banks typically have their own Power of Attorney forms and require the use of their forms.

Additionally it is possible that Wells Fargo might have its own rules for who can be an agent in a Power of Attorney, and also might restrict the rights and privileges of the person who is the Attorney in Fact. I read online that you cannot use online banking if you are an Attorney in Fact for a Wells Fargo Power of Attorney Form. However, I cannot vouch for the truthfulness of that statement as it might be outdated or false.

Banks will want to see the Power of Attorney and identification before allowing the Attorney in Fact (grantee or agent) the right to access an individual’s account.

How do I get a Wells Fargo Power of Attorney Form?
Once again, please contact Wells Fargo customer service.

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Other Links:

Legal Zoom Banking Power of Attorney Information
https://info.legalzoom.com/gain-access-bank-accounts-power-attorney-25538.html

Finding out your Power of Attorney is powerless — NY Times Article
https://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/10/health/finding-out-your-power-of-attorney-is-powerless.html

How do you get a Power of Attorney document?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20785
Power of Attorney (string of blog entries)
http://blog.123notary.com/?tag=power-of-attorney

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1 Comment »

  1. When a prospective client tells me they need to have a Power of Attorney/Durable Power of Attorney notarized, I also recommend to them to check with their bank to make sure they would accept it. Some banks and credit unions have their own OIA forms and want to have those signed by the client, notarized and kept in their file. This “helpful hint” has literally saved my clients from “embarrassing moments” with their bank.

    Comment by Ellen Michaels — March 19, 2019 @ 1:20 pm

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