(4) Documents Archives - Page 2 of 5 - Notary Blog - Signing Tips, Marketing Tips, General Notary Advice - 123notary.com
123Notary

Notary Blog – Signing Tips, Marketing Tips, General Notary Advice – 123notary.com Control Panel

December 5, 2016

Affidavit of Support

What is an Affidavit of Support?
The Affidavit of Support is a common immigration document. This document needs to be notarized with a Jurat (a common Notary act which involves a sworn oath.) The purpose of this document is typically for one family member to promise to the government that they will financially take care of the individual who they are trying to bring to the United States.

Where can I learn about Affidavits of Support?
For official information about this document, please consult an Immigration Attorney or the Department of Immigration. Please do not ask immigration questions to a notary as they are not authorized to answer these types of specialized questions unless they have some type of official authorization.

How do you notarize an Affidavit of Support?
Please make sure you have the document in your hand, and fully understand it before calling a Notary. The Notary will have you swear under Oath and sign in front of him/her. Next, the Notary will will in the Jurat certificate verbiage (notary wording) in the form and stamp the document in at least one place. When I was a Notary, Affidavits of Support required two stamps. There is also a problem that the document doesn’t leave ample room for the Notary Seal, so try to squeeze it in or attach a separate Jurat form if the client chooses for you to do so.

My personal experience with Affidavits of Support.
I had fun notarizing Affidavits of Support. I had lots of clients from around the world who treated me to tamales, dim sum, Thai coffee, and other international treats. Notarizing for Chinese people is the best as they are much more likely to feed you than other nationalities — plus, I love Chinese food.

What are some other commonly Notarized immigration documents?
The Affidavit of Citizenship is a commonly notarized immigration document. The Affiant commonly drafts his/her own statement and then has the Notary notarize the statement which normally includes a sworn Oath and normally requires the signer to sign in the presence of the Notary.

.

You might also like:

Affidavit of Citizenship
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=2028

Modern Family: An Affidavit of citizenship & affidavit of domicile Notarized
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=10989

Affidavit of Support & Direct communication with the signer
http://blog.123notary.com/?tag=affidavit-of-support

Share
>

November 29, 2016

Subordination Agreement

Filed under: (4) Documents — Tags: , — admin @ 10:24 am

What is a Subordination Agreement?
A Subordination Agreement is a notarized document that establishes the order of liens against a property. If the property owner defaults in a payment resulting in a bankruptcy, the lien mentioned first in the subordination agreement gets paid off first from the proceeds.

If you are refinancing your first mortgage and have an existing second or home equity line, one could “subordinate” the second mortgage: request that your second mortgage holder go back into the second lien position when you replace your existing first mortgage with the new refinance loan. The Subordination Agreement is the document used for this purpose. The Subordination Agreement always needs to be notarized and recorded with the county recorder.

How can you notarize a Subordination Agreement?
The Subordination Agreement is commonly notarized with an Acknowledgment. You would need to personally appear before a Notary Public with this document signed by you. Then, you would sign the Notary’s journal (in most states) and acknowledge that you signed the document. You would need to be identified by the Notary with a driver license, passport, or other current government issued photo ID with a physical description. Then the Notary would fill out the Acknowledgment wording, sign and seal the paperwork, and you’re done. This document needs to be recorded at your county clerk’s office as stateed above!

You might also like:

Signing Agent best practices 63 points
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=4315

Best blog articles for advanced Notaries
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=14736

Share
>

November 24, 2016

Photocopy of ID for a Power of Attorney?

Filed under: Ken Edelstein,Power of Attorney — Tags: — admin @ 11:38 pm

Photocopy of ID for a Power of Attorney?
Confession is good for the soul, though sometimes it might land you in the Pokey. With trembling fingers and much trepidation; I relate the following sad story. Before doing so, please understand that I receive many of my blog entries from what happened to me: http://kenneth-a-edelstein.com

It’s a close call, perhaps even a tie. No, I’m giving the Power of Attorney top billing for fraud potential, first runner up will be the Deed. I have heard the Power of Attorney referred to as “the cocaine of legal documents” – strong language indeed! With that, and the first paragraph as background:

The call comes in from a highly distraught caller, the parent is terminal. The sibling needs a Power of Attorney – urgently and quickly. It was difficult to obtain the information I require to determine if the request should be accepted. I don’t have “higher” ID requirements to process a Power of Attorney; to me a notarization is a notarization. Sometimes the methodology differs, but, basically we ID, witness signature, give oath, then complete notary section. In addition to a nice clean, well inked, stamp; it is my custom to emboss every time.

Back to the caller. With hospital situations the ID is often a problem. I managed to learn that both the patient and the sibling have driver license photo ID. Never skimp on the oath with any part of a Power of Attorney. So, I inquire as to the patient’s ability to understand the document, my notary oath; and is able to sign unassisted. OK so far, there will be two copies processed of the Power of Attorney; and both the Principal and the sibling Agent will be notarized. As this was to be done in the room of a terminal cancer patient, I was told I would have to “suit up” to protect the patient.

In a prior blog http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16469 – I had harsh words for notaries who refused a blind affiant. Well, I’m sure many would not want this assignment. Going into a terminal cancer situation is emotionally taxing. Again, I stress the “ground rules” for me to be able to notarize. The Agent wishes to PayPal, immediately – probably assuming that would assure my arrival. She mentioned that the hospital was in possession of the patient’s credentials, and that obtaining the driver license would not be a problem.

Surprise. I am shown a photocopy of the Patient’s driver license. I gently go into my explanation of why a photocopy cannot be accepted. I had to. Unfortunately, the Agent broke down in tears. The Power of Attorney, while not being a Health Care Proxy; was desperately needed for some expenses. I am as empathetic as most, but a Photocopy? Not a chance – not because it’s a Power of Attorney, but because that does not (in my sole opinion) meet the NY State standard of being shown “adequate proof”.

“The Patient Representative just delivered it to me”, “they cannot release the patient’s property unless I have a Power of Attorney”. Verifying with the Patient Representative, who had multiple hospital photo ID tags prominently displayed, “I cannot release any items, but did provide the driver license photocopy, made moments ago”. I accept the photocopy as valid ID, now being “adequate proof” – in my opinion.

I suit up. Facemask, hand washing, rubber gloves, cap and complete cover all gown. The patient cannot talk due to apparatus in throat; but is aware and answers some basic “understanding” questions with head motions. Patient, now Principal on the Power of Attorney, is just barely able to sign. I administer the oath and receive an affirmative series of “nods”. We adjourn to a conference room to process the Agent of the Power of Attorney and complete the paperwork. Another “rough” one, complete with a variance from “standards”.
I’m glad I was called first. I would not want “declining notaries” to exacerbate my client’s mental state.

Share
>

November 5, 2016

Affidavit of Citizenship

Filed under: Affidavits,Popular on Facebook (some) — Tags: — admin @ 9:52 am

What is an Affidavit of Citizenship?
The Affidavit of Citizenship is a common legal form that is required by immigration services in some cases. Many people need to get an Affidavit of Citizenship Notarized. This document is normally notarized using the Notary act called a Jurat which requires a sworn oath.

Terminology:

Jurat — a type of Notarization that involves a Sworn Oath where the Notary must sign before the Notary Public.
Affiant — the person or individual who swears under Oath perhaps before a Judge or Notary Public.
Affirmation — For those who do not believe in swearing under Oath, many states allow them to Affirm that information is correct while under Oath.
Oath — a solemn Notary act where the signer (who is also the Affiant) raises their right hand and swears under Oath to the truthfulness of the document, or just makes up their own Oath wording for a particular official purpose or commission.
Affidavit — a document (perhaps a legal document) which requires an Affiant to swear under Oath before a Notary to have it notarized.

Drafting an Affidavit of Citizenship
Most Notaries are not authorized to draft legal documents. It is prudent to contact an Attorney or or someone authorized to draft documents. If you appear before a Notary and ask for a notarized Affidavit of Citizenship, the Notary will ask you to present the document to him/her. If you don’t have a document and expect the Notary to write it, you are wasting the Notary’s time. It might not even be legal for a Notary to draft such a document as they are not an Attorney in most cases. So, have a professional draft up a quick document for you, perhaps at a low-cost legal center. After the document is complete — then contact a notary.

Notarizing an Affidavit of Citizenship
A sample wording for an Affidavit of Citizenship might be —

“I, Joe Smith solemnly swear that I am a citizen of the United States of America, so help me God.”
Signature of Affiant _____________________

The Notary could attach a Jurat certificate to the document with this statement. The Notary would ask the signer to raise his/her right hand and swear under Oath to the truthfulness of the statement. Then the Notary would fill in the Jurat form, sign it, and stamp it with his/her official Notary Seal. The Notary needs to be paid whatever the state regulated Notary fee is for a Jurat. Additionally, many Notaries engage in traveling Notary work and should be paid a travel fee, plus waiting time if applicable.

Can the Affidavit of Support be in Spanish?
Official legal documents filed in the United States should be written in English unless you have written permission to write it in Spanish or another language.

Giving Legal Advice
A non-Attorney may not give legal advice. Most Notaries are not Attorneys and therefore may not give legal advice. Additionally, Notaries Public are not authorized to assist in the immigration process or give advice regarding immigration. If you have a legal quesiton or an immigration question, do not ask a Notary, rather, ask an authorized person such as an immigration official, Attorney, or perhaps someone authorized in a legal support profession at a law office if applicable.

What are some other notarized immigration documents or regular documents?
The Affidavit of Support is another commonly notarized immigration document. It states that a particular individual will take care of the sponsored individual in financial and other ways. Basically, a family member can attempt to assist another family member enter the United States by signing an Affidavit of Support. In addition to immigration documents, it is common for Notaries to notarize permission for minors to travel outside of the United States with an adult. Deeds, contracts, Power of Attorney, other types of Affidavits, Name Affidavits, Titles, and other types of documents are regularly notarized as well.

Where can I find a Notary to notarize my Affidavit of Support?
Right here on 123notary.com’s advanced search page! You can find a Spanish speaking Notary by using the language filter on the upper right corner of the search results after you have searched by zip code.

Share
>

October 26, 2016

Most loan documents haven’t changed since the 80’s

Most Mortgage loan documents haven’t changed since the 80’s. Which ones would you change? With the advent of the Closing disclosure, the HUD and the Truth in Lending were eliminated. But, did that really improve the loan industry? It’s the same information in a different form. Personally, I liked it better the old way. The music was better in the 80’s as well, but that’s a different story (or song).

Then we have Deeds of Trust. Each one is a different length. They range from two pages to 54 pages. Wouldn’t it be easier if there were a standardized length for a Deed of Trust. And who is going to sit and read all 54 pages and actually understand it.

Next, the 1003 always has wrong information in it. Shouldn’t it be required by law to double check your work if you work in a Mortgage or Title house?

The Signature Affidavit is another document I don’t like. If you have a legal name, you should use that name on all of your documents. It’s too complicated if you keep changing your name around with variations. Mathematicians like to have a single name for an entity. The minute you have multiple names it becomes difficult to identify that entity especially if writing computer programming code. Personally, if your last name is a common name like Smith, Gonzalez, or Hussein, you should definitely use a middle initial. But, life is easier with email addresses. A single email address cannot be assigned to more than one person. Personally, I think that the government should make us have an official registered email address that they patrol for spam. That way, we can be reached without having to go to the mail box. Times are changing, but our government and loan brokers are not.

The Flood Disclosure is another document that I find funny. I think it would be ironic if you spilled your Pepsi on a flood disclosure of all of the documents in the stack.

Speaking of irony, hairstyles have gotten shorter since the 80’s, but loan document packages seem to have gotten longer — and with more fax backs.

I think that loans need to be simpler and that the government should step in and have some standards. But, in the mean time, we’ll do what we can. Let us know if there are any changes to loan documents that you recommend.

.

You might also like:

Ken’s tips for the Closing Disclosure
http://blog.123notary.com/?tag=closing-disclosure

The 4506, Name Affidavit, Deeds, and more documents explained
http://blog.123notary.com/?cat=2074

Share
>

June 19, 2016

Ken’s tips for the Closing Disclosure

Timing Changes to the Closing Process
Well, it’s bye bye time for the good old TIL and HUD. No longer will notaries be waiting for approval of the “final HUD”. Hooray. Borrowers will usually have the new Closing Statement 6 days prior to notary arrival! Less chance for a surprise at the table.
The changes to loan and closing procedures are far more than a few new documents. The biggest changes are to the closing time-lines.

Documents
The HUD-1 and Truth in Lending forms will be replaced by a new “Closing Disclosure.”

Terminology
You will need to learn a new vocabulary. Some common terms are:
TRID = TILA/RESPA Integrated Disclosure
CD = Closing Disclosure
Consummation = Closing
CFPB = Consumer Finance Protection Bureau

Time Frames
New timing and delivery requirements will change the way we handle closings. This is the BIG news for the 123notary.com gang! There is new stuff to consider about timing:
The final Closing Disclosure must be delivered and received no later than 3 business days prior to closing.

If the lender sends the final documents 6 business days prior to closing, they don’t need to prove the buyer(s) receipt.

Most lenders will mail the closing disclosure 6 business days before closing. This pushes back the time frames for closing and makes it harder, if not impossible to address late breaking changes or issues in the days leading up to closing.
Fewer last minute notary requests: Lenders will have less time to get loans approved and the parties will have much more difficulty making last minute changes and adjustments.

You might also like:

The Closing Disclosure
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16217

The 4506, Name Affidavit, Deeds, and more documents explained
http://blog.123notary.com/?cat=2074

Share
>

May 31, 2016

Changed! Form 4506 Request for Copy of Tax Return

Changed! Form 4506 Request for Copy of Tax Return
Also changed is the similar Form 4506-T. Both forms being reviewed are September 2015 (look in upper left hand corner). The big change is the addition of a Mandatory check box next to the signature area. The signer must check box to attest to having authority to sign either form. “The form will not be processed and returned to you if the box is unchecked”. So, heads up about this – make sure they check the box when they sign. As we are there to make sure forms are completed correctly – take a few minutes and read the instruction page.

Most of the time the package will include Form 4506, but, perhaps not. The 4506 now has a fifty dollar fee per year requested, in addition to the above mentioned check box. There is another new option for the 4506. It’s a check box (at the extreme right) “If the copies must be certified for court or administrative proceedings”. That is probably necessary if the document is to receive an Apostille, but not sure. Either spouse may sign the form, or both may sign – I usually try for both.

Form 4506-T is quite different, rather than requesting a “copy” of the actual return; it requests a “Transcript” of the entries made on the return. This one is processed free. Oddly the contents of the 4506-T are specified on the 4506. At the top of the 4506 it states “The transcript provides most of the line entries from the original tax return and usually contains the information that a third party (such as a mortgage company) requires”.

Form 4506-T contains several options (again with check boxes on the right hand edge). Line 5 (where to send it) probably should be completed with the address of title or similar; otherwise the info is sent to the taxpayer. Prior to the check boxes the choice of which form must be entered – most would probably enter 1040. Then it’s on to selecting what type of transcript is required. It’s all on the form, so I’m not covering options 6-a to 6-c. Line 7 is interesting – here you request from the IRS proof that you did NOT file a return for tax year(s). Line 9 is where the tax years requested are specified.

The attestations of authority checkbox and signature areas are basically the same on both forms.
So, with the 50$ fee for the complete copy; many are likely to move to the 4506-T, processed at no charge. Thus, it would be wise to print them both each has only one page of instructions. Read the instructions carefully and understand the difference between the two. It’s unlikely that the borrower will know what options are required on the 4506-T. It’s best when you see it to review your instructions for what options are wanted. If no information is given, call for details. It appears that 6-c and option 8 provides the most complete information.

Fortunately, neither form requires notarization, yet? What sets us apart from the “bank notary” is our dedication to keeping up with changing requirements and understanding the need to have forms completed properly. Make sure that line 5 (shipping address) is not overlooked. And, if you have a 4506-T to work with, know what entries are required – don’t guess. And don’t rely on “them” to pre-enter the necessary information. Get it right the first time and be the one they call regularly.

.

You might also like:

Ken’s tips for the Closing Disclosure
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=17116

The Signature Name Affidavit
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16298

A comprehensive guide to Deeds
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16285

Share
>

April 26, 2016

The Signature Name Affidavit

The Signature/Name Affidavit
It is most likely that you are not processing this simple form properly. First, the good news; of all the forms in various loan packages this one is probably one of the most uniform. There really is little variation in how this form is structured. I will get to where most “go wrong”; but first a bit about the purpose and structure of the SNA.

The package comes from many sources. There are bank docs, title docs, escrow docs and perhaps some from other sources. It’s a virtual certainty that the borrower name will have some slight variation on documents. Of course the key name is the one on the ID and that is the name that you will notarize; we all know that. But, how about the name variations present in the package? This form is used to state, under oath, that the affiant is “also” known as. It’s a one way form. It can only be used to add variations to the notarized name as proven. It cannot be used to “prove”, for notarization purposes a name that does not match the ID presented.

The first entry is the legal name, which I define as what is on the ID. Thus, if the middle name is on that line it must be on the ID. If, for example the middle name is NOT on the ID, it should be redacted from the top line (proven name only) and that name “demoted” to an “also known as” line in the second area. Yes, the 3 part name is their legal name, BUT – as it was not proven to me I cannot notarize it. If the ID has only the middle initial, that is the “first line” entry. They can “acquire” the middle name in full as an “also known as” in a subsequent entry.

All subsequent entries (AKAs) should include variations, including but not limited to maiden names. The most common variations are the inclusion and omission of middle initials. One approach to completing the form is to keep it on the table while processing other documents. Add to the AKA section each name variation as noticed. Ask the borrower to print and sign the AKA in parallel to processing the bulk of the package. The printed name on the left will have the variation; usually the “matching” signature on the right will be the same for each entry.

The SNA can be used in court, along with a handwriting expert; to determine a signature is authentic on a document. As the signatures were witnessed by a notary, they can be accepted as valid when comparing to a different document. For this reason it’s a good practice to N/A any unused AKA lines; so subsequent names / signatures cannot be added; do you do that?

At the start of this entry I said you probably are not processing this properly, now to prove that statement. After the AKAs there is usually a statement “and that (usually filled in with the preprinted AKA(s)) are one and the same person”. However, you probably added one or more names to the AKA entries, and had the borrower sign on the right. What you might be overlooking is the need to ALSO put the added AKAs to the statement at the bottom! Take a look at an AKA form; there is a reason that they left plenty of room. That section is often overlooked!

It’s a signing, not a closing for most of us. We are there to collect signatures and initials. It’s rare for ALL the docs to have precisely the same name; rarer still for that name to be exactly what is on the presented ID. Proper completion of the SNA is mandatory, and avoiding a redraw will mark you as both a hero and a skilled professional. But don’t go overboard; adding your own SNA is probably not a good idea. If you need one and it was not supplied, call for “what to do”!

.

You might also like:

Ken’s tips for the Closing Disclosure
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=17116

A comprehensive guide to Deeds
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16285

Share
>

April 19, 2016

Good Deed Bad Deed

A deed is a document that transfers ownership of real estate from grantor to grantee. As there are usually two parties involved, the grantee wants to “receive the most” and the grantor wants to “give the least”. For this reason there is a gradient of “what is given”, ranging from virtually nothing being assured, to virtually absolute assurance going to the grantee.

Quit Claim Deed – used to transfer whatever ownership the grantor may have, possibly none whatsoever due to a title flaw. Grantee has no recourse. It’s also used to change vesting errors when a spelling error is in the vesting. It makes no warranty whatsoever.

Fiduciary Deed – issued by an agent (trustee, guardian, executor) acting in official capacity. Only the authority of the agent is warranted, think Quit Claim by other than “owner”. Often used by estates, trusts, sheriffs sales.

Bargain and Sale Deed – similar to Quit Claim, but the property is being sold rather than just relinquished. It does not guarantee that sellers’ ownership of the property is free and clear. Often used to transfer court seized property where the title chain is uncertain.

Trust Deed / Deed of Trust – used to secure a mortgage or note. It gives the trustee (typically the bank) the right to sell the property if the borrower defaults.

Grant Deed – provides assurance that the grantor owns the property and has not previously sold the property. And that there are no liens or encumbrances (made by the grantor) unless disclosed in the deed. Essentially saying the property is free of debt (of or by the grantor).

Special/Limited Warranty Deed – the grantor warrants clear title except for issues that existed prior to the grantor taking possession or are mentioned in the deed. Essentially the grantor is giving assurance that they did nothing to hinder clear title transfer. But, issues typically unknown to seller regarding title are not covered. Usually title insurance is required with the S/L WD to obtain bank approval for loans.

General Warranty Deed – Grantor conveys, without limitation, all of their right, title and interest to the property. Guaranteeing they are the rightful owner, property is free and clear of all encumbrances and debt (unless mentioned in deed). A key provision is that the grantor warrants the entire title chain, including issues prior to their taking possession to be clear, similar to title insurance. Grantor warrants having current title and possession.

Thus at one end of the spectrum is the quit claim deed, essentially saying “if it’s mine, it’s yours”; to the general warranty deed. With the GWD giving assurances as to clear ownership and the “Covenant of Quiet Enjoyment”. The COQE assuring the grantee will not be disturbed or dispossessed by a party having a lien or superior title. As is so often the case with legal documents, the devil is in the details. Fortunately, the title of the deed can quickly eliminate formats that are undesired. However, deeds are usually associated with purchases involving large sums of money, often the largest single purchase in a person’s lifetime. Many review the HUD, TIL, Note and Mortgage very carefully. But, they assume “a deed is a deed”. It’s best to have a skilled real estate attorney explain the deed prior to signing this important document.

.

You might also like:

The Closing Disclosure
http://blog.123notary.com/?tag=closing-disclosure

The Signature Affidavit
http://blog.123notary.com/?tag=signature-affidavit

The Compliance Agreement
http://blog.123notary.com/?tag=compliance-agreement

Our string on Power of Attorney posts
http://blog.123notary.com/?tag=power-of-attorney

The Deed of Trust
http://blog.123notary.com/?tag=deed-of-trust

Affidavits — in general
http://blog.123notary.com/?tag=affidavit

Share
>

February 27, 2016

The Compliance Agreement

The Compliance Agreement
This document is often part of a loan package. While not notarized, “The undersigned hereby agrees to cooperate”. This cooperation includes working with both the lender and the Escrow or “Closing Agent” to facilitate “reasonable requests”. This cooperation is subsequent to the closing, on an “if necessary” basis. Said cooperation includes providing any and all documentation “deemed necessary or desirable”. It is very open ended with an enforcement clause, to be discussed later in this installment.

The affiants to this agreement, often both the buyer and the seller, are obligated to assist, as “necessary”, to complete the transaction. This completion can include verbiage to include the marketability of the loan and/or securing title insurance. They may be requested (really required) to re-execute documents or sign additional documents. They may also be asked to provide previously “not relevant or considered” documents, to facilitate the closing.

Score one for stating the obvious. While researching this blog, one of the compliance agreement documents specifically stated: The sellers are not required to perform duties and responsibilities of the buyer, and the reverse is also understood. As mentioned the responsibilities of the affiants is a bit open ended. They are both required to not only facilitate requests “deemed necessary” but also those “desirable”. An up to date appraisal would certainly be desirable, but it’s not clearly spelled out who would be required to pay if this was requested. Similarly, it’s not clear who would be responsible for expenses to make the loan “insurable”.

While this document is usually a single page; the issues are rather complex. There are four parties involved: The Lender, the Title Co., the Borrower, and the Seller. It’s easy to visualize conflicts developing. The “enforcement arm” is frequently in the last paragraph. This section includes for recovery of all expenses, and lawyer fees, by the winning party if it is adjudicated.

Thus failure to comply with an “it’s desirable” request (demand?) from Title, might result in Title obtaining the item and billing the, for example; seller. Additionally the seller would, if they contest the cost, and lose; have to pay the attorney fees of the Title Company. Quite a lot of responsibility is included on that one little page. Few bother to read it. It’s generally explained (not by the Notary!) as agreeing to resign a lost document; but it really comprises much more.

I often wondered why such a “strong” document is rarely if ever notarized. Perhaps the public perception of notarized documents being “binding” and others “contestable” is in play. Whatever the reason, all affiants should be aware of the broad scope of the Compliance Agreement. It’s more than just allowing clerical errors to be corrected, much more. I have heard it explained away as only allowing for the correction of typographical errors. “If we put the comma in the wrong place and say you only pay fifty cents a month, not five hundred a month; we are allowed to correct that typo”. Yes, it’s that; but also much more.

How does this apply to the notary? From my prospective the issues are so broad, vague and potentially of great economic effect – I would not attempt to “explain” it; not a bit. If asked a question related to the Compliance Agreement, for me it’s an immediate call to the Loan Officer.

You might also like:

The 30 point course lesson on the Compliance Agreement
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=14335

A comprehensive guide to Deeds
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16285

Share
>
« Newer PostsOlder Posts »