You searched for notary fees - Notary Blog - Signing Tips, Marketing Tips, General Notary Advice - 123notary.com
123Notary

Notary Blog – Signing Tips, Marketing Tips, General Notary Advice – 123notary.com Control Panel

October 13, 2020

10 rules for negotiating Notary fees

Originally published in Nov 06, 2017

Many Notaries complain about how little they get paid. And then I complain about how little they know. The two tend to go together and the pay is not going to go up before the knowledge does. However, there are negotiating techniques that can help.

1. Let them name their price first
In a bargaining game, it is better to let the other person bid first. You can always raise your ask price if they don’t offer enough. But, if they offer far too much, you would never get it if you asked first and asked too low.

2. Start with a high ask price
If you ask for $125, you can always go down on your price, especially if the job is close or fast. You can ask how many pages, fax backs, and notarizations are in the package. If it is quick, then give them a quick price.

3. Never whine
If you whine about the condition of the industry or how low the fee was, people will think you are a low life. Professionals don’t whine. Professionals operate! So, if you are offered $60, ask for $85 and see what happens.

4. Decline the low-ball offers
If you spend all day working for peanuts, then when the good jobs come, you won’t have time. Decline bad offers so you are free for good offers.

5. Answer your phone
If you only offer when you are not in a signing and not driving or cooking or thinking, you will miss 80% of your calls. How can you negotiate a good fee if you don’t take the call in the first place?

6. Act professional
Try to impress them without trying to impress them. Most Notaries try to do a snow job and brag about how great they are. Seasoned operators don’t do this. Smart professionals will engage you in an intelligent conversation about the job, the industry and the state of the union. Ask them questions about the job, where it is, who it is for, what type of loan it is, and about their career and industry working in title or escrow. But, whatever you do, don’t talk about your zero percent error rate and how reliable and experienced you are — nobody can verify your claims and nobody wants to hear it.

7. Never say hello
Unless you work for an aloe vera companies, don’t answer the phone saying “aloe?” Answer stating your company name and personal name. It sounds professional. If you have screaming kids in the background that sounds horribly unprofessional. Have a quiet place to answer the phone and if you are in a noisy place, try to go to a quieter place and apologize about the noise. Just because you don’t mind noise doesn’t mean the title company enjoys barking dog and screaming three year old.

8. Talk about real life
Sometimes I talk to Notaries who tell the Title company that you can call me to clean up the mess after you hire one of those $50 signers. Over half my work is clean up work. That sounds real to title companies unlike all the nonsense about how experienced and knowledgeable you are which just sounds like fluff. Tell real stories about how you handled complicated situations that others might have goofed. Mention that split signing where you did some complicated manouver on the Acknowledgment certificate and how you went out to sign the wife at 3am because she could only see you at that time due to her busy schedule as a nurse. This is impressive and much better than fluff.

9. Negotiate timing
You can offer a better rate if they get you late after rush hour. They might prefer to just offer you more and get the job booked.

10. Double book and get a bad review
Yes, you’ll get bad reviews from this, but double booking makes sense. People cancel jobs all the time when they hire you, so why can’t you cancel a few jobs. If you book jobs tightly, the other person will cancel 20% of the time — at least. So, if you book a job for $60 and someone else offers you $150, you can ditch the first job and take the other. You will probably get a bad review that will last for three years, but you will have $90 extra in your pocket. It’s a dirty technique. Not recommended, but food for thought and great blog material.

11. Never let them see you sweat.
Appearing calm and collected are the way to go. If you seem flustered, that is bad. Oops, that was eleven rules and I promised ten. Okay, disregard point eleven and just use antiperspirant.

You might also like:

How to negotiate fees like a pro
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19198

Can you negotiate prices with SnapDocs?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16236

Notary Marketing 102 – Negotiating Fees
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19784

A complete guide to getting paid
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19794

Share
>

September 16, 2019

Travel fees vs. Notary fees in your journal

Filed under: Journals — admin @ 11:10 pm

For those of you who keep a Notary journal, you need to record the Notary fee as one of the fields. But, what if you get paid $65 for a signing with a travel fee and two signatures? How do you differentiate between the travel fee and the signature fees?

You can either arbitrarily decide how much is a travel fee and how much is a signature fee if the job is a flat fee. Or you can base the fees on the fees you quoted the client.

When you fill in your journal, the main thing is to put a Notary fee that does not exceed the fees allowed by your particular state, otherwise you could be accused of charging excessive fees which is illegal. If California allows $15 per notarized signature on an Acknowledgment or Jurat, then you cannot inscribe more than $15 per journal entry for each Notary act.

For those of you who use the “cram it in” style of journal entries, you cannot put a notary fee for five documents on the same line. It just doesn’t make sense. This is yet another potent reason why you should not use a style of journal entry that inputs more than one document per line. It is impossible to prove in court that the signer consented to all of the documents being notarized since he is not signing for a particular one. It is also not possible to know what the fees involved are either which means you are not doing proper bookkeeping.

As far as the travel fee, you could input the travel fee for a particular appointment in the additional notes section of the journal entry and indicate that is is a travel fee. The travel fee I would indicate once on the first journal entry for a particular appointment. Correct and prudent journal entry procedure requires separate entries for each person and document. So, once again, three people each signing four notarized documents would result in twelve journal entries with the travel fee indicated in the top entry.

You might also like:

Travel fees if nothing gets signed
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22578

Why are the fees offered to us so low you ask?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22293

Share
>

January 23, 2019

What are Mobile Notary Fees?

The states decide what a Notary can charge for Notary services, but few states have rules for what a Mobile Notary or Traveling Notary can charge for mobile services and waiting time.

Notaries in most states (NV & MD have restrictions I’ve heard) can charge whatever they want for Mobile Notary Fees. There are many factors that determine a Notary’s fees. I will list these factors below. Rates generally range from $20 to $50 for mobile fees plus notary fees which differ by the state.

Experience
Notaries with experience typically set their rates higher. The fee depends on how desperate or arrogant they are. Rates can really vary, so shop around. But, realize that getting the best rate is not always the best idea because knowledge and experience count. Also note, that years of experience rarely translate into knowledge. Most Notaries are show offs and typically brag about how many years they have been doing this job. But, when you drill them on knowledge, you might find out they have about the same knowledge as someone doing this for two years who reads Notary tutorials and handbooks regularly. A word to the wise!

Distance
Notaries charge for distance. Some calculate distance based on miles, while others focus more on how long it will take. Others charge by what county you are in or what particular area you are in. It will save you money if you find someone close.

Time of Day
If you hire a Notary during the day, there are more Notaries operating, and the price is lower. If you want a Notary to go to a hospital at 3am, you might be looking at paying double or triple the normal fee. Sometimes the Notaries who offer 24 hour service will yell at you and ask, “Why are you calling me so late? Do you have any idea what time it is?”

Type of Job
If the job is a document signing or loan signing the price will be more of a standard price. Most Notaries do loan signings for $70 to $110 unless they consider themselves to be fancy in which case the price would be $125 to $175. Hospital and Jail jobs cost more because there is more involved, more legal risk, more waiting time, and the clients are normally more difficult. Additionally, since fewer Notaries will do hospital and jail signings, the price by default goes up.

Printing
If the Notary needs to print or fax anything the price goes up.

Waiting Time
If you keep an experienced Notary waiting, they will normally want to get some sort of compensation for their time. Some have a set rate while others have a very foggy idea of what to do if you keep them waiting. Try to be prepared so you don’t keep anyone waiting.

Legal Advice
Please do not ask a Notary for legal advice. They are not authorized to give any, and you will not get good information from a notary about legal matters anyway unless they are an Attorney Notary. Ask an Attorney who is competent and specializes in whatever your question is.

Document Drafting
Ask an Attorney where to get your document drafted and what terms to put in it. Notaries should not help in drafting documents unless they are legally authorized to do so which is rare.

.

You might also like:

A comprehensive guide to Notary pricing
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16504

How much does a Notary charge in 2019?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=21308

Best humorous Notary Posts
http://blog.123notary.com/?cat=3241

If you overcharge — notary fines and penalties
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=6903

Share
>

March 12, 2018

Notary Marketing 102 — Negotiating Fees

Filed under: Loan Signing 101,Popular on Twitter — admin @ 8:23 am

Return to Notary Marketing 102 Contents

.

As a Notary, knowing what you are doing, having a good advertising presence, and being reliable all matter. But, if you don’t know how to negotiate fees, you will crumble in this low-ball world. Here are some of the best negotiating tips in the industry from our top players.

.

1. Let them name their price first
When bargaining, it is much better to let the other person bid first. You can always raise your ask price if they don’t offer enough. But, if they offer far too much, you would never get it if you asked first and asked too low.

.

2. Start with a high ask price
If you ask for $125 or $150, you can always go down on your price, especially if the job is close or fast. You can ask how many pages, fax backs, and notarizations are in the package. If the job is quick, then give them a quick price.

.

3. Never whine
If you whine about the condition of the industry or how low the fee was, people will think you are a low life. Professionals don’t whine. Professionals operate! So, if you are offered $60, ask for $85 and see what happens.

.

4. Decline the low-ball offers
If you spend all day working for peanuts, then when the good jobs come, you won’t have time. Decline bad offers so you are free for good offers.

.

5. Answer your phone
If you only offer when you are not in a signing and not driving or cooking or thinking, you will miss 80% of your calls. How can you negotiate a good fee if you don’t take the call in the first place?

.

6. Act professional
Try to impress them without trying to impress them. Most Notaries try to do a snow job and brag about how great they are. Seasoned operators don’t do this. Smart professionals will engage you in an intelligent conversation about the job, the industry and the state of the union. Ask them questions about the job, where it is, who it is for, what type of loan it is, and about their career and industry working in title or escrow. But, whatever you do, don’t talk about your zero percent error rate and how reliable and experienced you are — nobody can verify your claims and nobody wants to hear it.

.

7. Announce your name when you answer the phone.
Answer the stating your company name and personal name and never say, “Hullo?”. It sounds professional to announce yourself properly. If you have screaming kids in the background that sounds horribly unprofessional. Have a quiet place to answer the phone and if you are in a noisy place, try to go to a quieter place and apologize about the noise. Just because you don’t mind noise doesn’t mean the title company enjoys barking dog and screaming three year old.

.

8. Talk about real life
Sometimes I talk to Notaries who tell the Title company that you can call me to clean up the mess after you hire one of those $50 signers. Over half my work is clean up work. That sounds real to title companies unlike all the nonsense about how experienced and knowledgeable you are which just sounds like fluff. Tell real stories about how you handled complicated situations that others might have goofed. Mention that split signing where you did some complicated manouver on the Acknowledgment certificate and how you went out to sign the wife at 3am because she could only see you at that time due to her busy schedule as a nurse. This is impressive and much better than fluff.

.

9. Negotiate timing
You can offer a better rate if they get you late after rush hour. They might prefer to just offer you more and get the job booked.

.

10. Double book and get a bad review
You’ll get many bad reviews from this, but double booking makes sense. People cancel jobs all the time when they hire you, so why can’t you cancel a few jobs. If you book jobs tightly, generally at least one of the clients will cancel 20% of the time — at least. So, if you book a job for $60 and someone else offers you $150, you can ditch the first job and take the other. You will probably get a bad review that will last for three years, but you will have $90 extra in your pocket. It’s a dirty technique. Not recommended, but food for thought and great blog material.

11. Negotiating on SnapDocs
You need to know how to negotiate if you use SnapDocs. The majority of Notary work (not the majority of the high paying work though) comes from SnapDocs these days. Their technology wins the game although their fees for using their system are a little exorbitant. When given an offer on Snapdocs by text, you need to turn the situation around.

Let’s say you are offered $60 for a job. Text them back saying I have signed “x” amount of loans in my career and “x” amount being the Purchase that you are assigning. I will accept the job and get it signed within three hours, but my fee is $85. Do you want a seasoned pro or a screw up? References available upon request.

There are Notaries who prosper on SnapDocs. Just not that many. And the ones who do well merit doing well with their superior notary and business skills. Negotiating fees will not get you far if you are an unskilled Notary or beginner. You are competing against 12,000 other Notaries (estimate) on SnapDocs who also don’t know anything. So negotiate only when you have a bargaining position.

.

12. Stress Availability
As a Notary, there are a lot of others competing with you. If you are fast returning texts, answer your phone promptly and are available, you can get a lot more work. The other notaries are not so responsive. Let people know that you are available and can get the job done. That is a huge bargaining chip. And do so without sounding desperate.

.

13. Be Willing to Talk
Many Notaries are unwilling to talk to others while in a signing. If someone calls about business, give them 90 seconds before cutting them off. You don’t know if what they are calling about could help you or hurt you. Not giving them a chance to speak their mind will be very frustrating. Many Notaries answer their phone only to tell me that they cannot talk. This is like opening your door only to slam it in someone’s face. It is better to answer and talk or don’t answer. Set a limit ahead of time. By being responsive and friendly, you will attract more business. If you think the job you are at is the only job, you are sacrificing your next job which might become a repeat client.

.

You might also like:

What are mobile notary fees
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=21383

Share
>

November 13, 2017

Notary loses $4000 in legal fees because fraud adds name to Acknowledgment certificate.

When I was a Notary and was handed some other Notary’s work, I normally saw that the he/she/they and capacity(ies) that needed cross outs did not have cross outs. By omitting the cross outs you cannot know if the signer is a single man, woman, or multiple people. California no longer allows Notaries to verify capacity which leaves one less thing to cross out.

If you as a Notary omit to cross out the she/they on an Acknowledgment for a single man, someone could add another name to the certificate and get away with it undetected. Notaries can be extremely negligent and don’t get caught — usually. But, I catch them by the dozen every day and penalize them on my site. I throw hundreds of Notaries off my site for failing my over the phone Notary quizzes. And others stay on the site but I deduct points from their point algorithm results which makes it very hard for them to upgrade. You might not take doing your job correctly seriously, but I do.

And then the Notaries who take their job seriously, but have been doing it wrong for 20 years and think that their work is flawless. I will catch you. I will expose many things you are not doing or are doing incorrectly. Better that I catch you rather than ending up in court with legal fees for not filling out forms correctly. Being a Notary is not rocket science. There is no reason for such negligence!

.

You might also like:

Penalties for Notary misdeeds and misconduct
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=2067

13 ways to get sued as a Notary
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19614

10 risks to being a Mobile Notary Public
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19459

The FBI is at your door and names you as a suspect!
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20013

Share
>

November 17, 2023

Building a Financial Plan for Your Notary Business

Filed under: Comprehensive Guides — Tags: — Tom Wilkins @ 12:00 am

Embarking on a notary business venture requires meticulous planning, especially concerning finances. One key element to ensure success in this field is to create a notary business budget. This budget will serve as a roadmap, guiding you through your financial decisions and helping you allocate resources wisely. In this guide, we’ll delve into creating a notary business budget, which is crucial for managing your expenses and maximizing your profits.

Creating a Notary Business Budget

  1. Understanding Your Revenue Streams: Before you can create a notary business budget, it’s essential to have a clear understanding of your potential income sources. This includes income from notarization fees and any ancillary services you may offer.
  2. Listing Your Expenses: The next step involves listing all your business expenses. These range from licensing fees, insurance, office supplies, and marketing costs to potential travel expenses if you offer mobile notary services.
  3. Allocating Funds for Growth and Contingencies: While creating your budget, it’s important to set aside funds for business growth opportunities, such as additional training or utilizing marketing tips for mobile notary services. Similarly, a contingency fund is vital for unexpected expenses.
  4. Regular Review and Adjustment: A budget isn’t set in stone. Regularly review your financial plan to ensure it aligns with your business needs and make adjustments as necessary.
  5. Leveraging Budgeting Tools: Use budgeting tools or software to keep track of your expenses and income. This helps in maintaining an organized and accurate financial record.

Expanded Description of Creating a Notary Business Budget

A comprehensive budget for your notary business should encompass several key components:

  1. Initial Capital and Ongoing Expenses: Understand the difference between one-time costs, like purchasing notary equipment, and recurring expenses, such as rent or subscription services.
  2. Income Estimation: Estimate your monthly income based on the services you offer. This will require market research and understanding the demand for notary services in your area.
  3. Cost Management: Identify areas where costs can be minimized without compromising the quality of your services.
  4. Emergency Fund: Always allocate a portion of your budget to an emergency fund. This can help you navigate through unforeseen circumstances with minimal financial stress.
  5. Profit Projection: After subtracting your expenses from your estimated income, you’ll clearly see your potential profit. Use this information to make informed decisions about expanding or scaling back your business operations.

Securing Financial Success in Your Notary Business

Creating a notary business budget is a continual journey marked by the synergy of pragmatism and adaptability. Embrace the dynamic nature of financial planning, letting it be a driving force for growth. Regularly scrutinize and refine your budget, fostering financial resilience and flexibility in response to evolving business demands. Understand that a meticulously designed budget transcends expense tracking, a powerful instrument propelling you toward your entrepreneurial aspirations. Seize the opportunity to shape your financial destiny, for a well-honed budget isn’t just a ledger—it’s the cornerstone of triumph, securing the enduring prosperity of your notary enterprise. Act now and witness the transformative impact of strategic financial stewardship.

Share
>

November 3, 2023

Best Practices for Designing a Notary Website

Filed under: Notary Marketing 102 — Tags: — Tom Wilkins @ 12:00 am

In the digital age, having a well-designed website is crucial for notaries to establish a professional online presence and attract potential clients. How to design a notary website is a common question for notaries looking to enhance their online presence. A notary website serves as a virtual office, offering information about services and building trust with visitors. To create an effective notary website, it’s essential to follow best practices that ensure a seamless user experience and a strong online reputation.

Clear and Professional Design

Your notary website’s design should be clean, professional, and easy to navigate. Use a simple color scheme, legible fonts, and a layout that guides visitors to essential information. Remember, the goal is to instill confidence in your services.

User-Friendly Navigation

Ensure that visitors can easily find the information they need. Organize your site with a logical menu structure, including sections for services, contact details, and frequently asked questions. Use clear labels and consider including a search feature to make navigation smoother.

Mobile Responsiveness

With most internet users accessing websites on mobile devices, your notary website must be mobile-responsive. A responsive design ensures your site looks and functions well on smartphones and tablets.

Engaging Content

High-quality content is essential. Describe your notary services clearly and engagingly. Include testimonials or case studies to build trust. Regularly update your blog with informative articles about notary services to demonstrate your expertise.

Contact Information

Make it easy for potential clients to get in touch and learn how to design a notary website. Place your contact information prominently on your website. Consider using a contact form to collect inquiries and ensure timely responses.

Security

Website security is vital, especially when dealing with sensitive legal documents. Use HTTPS to encrypt data transmission, keep your website’s software up to date, and employ security measures to protect against cyber threats.

SEO Optimization

Optimize your website for search engines to improve visibility. Use relevant keywords such as “notary services” and “legal notary” to increase the chances of your site appearing in search results. Regularly update your content to maintain search engine rankings.

Clear Pricing

Transparency in pricing is essential for mobile notary etiquette tips. If possible, provide a clear breakdown of your fees on your website. This can help potential clients understand the cost of your services upfront.

Legal Compliance

Ensure your website complies with legal requirements. Display any necessary disclaimers, privacy policies, and terms of service. This builds trust and demonstrates professionalism.

Social Media Integration

Integrate your social media profiles into your website. This not only enhances your online presence but also allows visitors to connect with you on different platforms.

Elevate Your Notary Business with a Well-Designed Website

Notary Website Best Practices

When it comes to how to design a notary website, these best practices are essential for success. A well-structured and professionally designed website will help you attract and retain clients, build trust, and establish your presence in the digital world. By prioritizing clear navigation, professional branding, mobile responsiveness, and informative content, you can create a website that not only represents your notary services but also converts visitors into loyal clients. Incorporating these principles is crucial for achieving a compelling notary website that stands out in the competitive online landscape. Stay committed to these practices, and your notary website will become a valuable tool for your business.

Share
>

October 20, 2023

How to Make More Money as a Notary

Filed under: Notary Fees & Pricing — Tags: — Tom Wilkins @ 12:00 am

Becoming a notary is not just about signing documents; it’s a versatile profession that offers numerous opportunities to increase your income. Whether you’re a seasoned notary or just starting your journey, various strategies exist to make more money in this field. In this blog post, we’ll explore ways to make more money as a notary, from traditional methods to modern, innovative approaches.

Offer Mobile Notary Services

One of the most effective ways to make more money as a notary is by offering mobile notary services. You can take your services to them instead of waiting for clients to come. Mobile notaries travel to clients’ homes, businesses, or other locations, providing convenience and flexibility. This service is particularly valuable for clients with busy schedules or mobility issues.

Specialize in Loan Signings

Loan signings are a lucrative niche within the notary business. When individuals or businesses secure loans or mortgages, they often require a notary to witness and authenticate the signing of important documents. By specializing in loan signings, you can tap into a consistent source of income, as these transactions are common and typically well-paid.

Become a Remote Online Notary (RON)

In today’s digital age, remote online notarization (RON) has become increasingly popular. RON allows you to notarize documents online, making it convenient for clients who can’t meet in person. To become a RON, you must complete the necessary training and obtain the required technology. While the initial setup may require an investment, it opens up a wide range of highly profitable online notarization opportunities.

Offer Field Inspection Services

Beyond notarization, consider expanding your services to include field inspections. Field inspectors assess properties, verify information, and collect data on behalf of clients. This additional service can supplement your income and provide a unique selling point to attract new clients.

Network and Build Client Relationships

Building a strong network and maintaining good client relationships is crucial for making more money as a notary. Word of mouth and repeat business can significantly impact your income. Stay in touch with previous clients, attend local business events, and consider joining professional notary associations to expand your network.

Market Your Notary Business Online

In the digital age, having a strong online presence is essential for attracting clients. Create a professional website, optimize it for search engines, and promote your notary services on social media platforms. Online marketing can help you reach a broader audience and increase your visibility in the competitive notary market.

Join Notary Signing Agent Platforms

Notary signing agent platforms connect notaries with clients who need loan signing services. These platforms often provide a steady stream of opportunities to notarize loan documents, allowing you to earn additional income. Popular platforms like NotaryCam and Notarize can be a great place to start.

Offer Evening and Weekend Appointments

Consider offering evening and weekend appointments to accommodate clients with busy work schedules. This flexibility can make you more appealing to a broader range of clients, increasing your earning potential.

Set Competitive Rates

While setting your notary fees, research the market to ensure competitive rates. Offering transparent pricing can attract more clients and lead to repeat business.

Notary Money-Making Tips to Increase Your Income

In conclusion, there are numerous ways to make more money as a notary. You can turn your notary side hustle into a full-time money-making career by diversifying your services, marketing effectively, and building strong client relationships. Remember, success in the notary business often comes from offering convenience and building trust with your clients. Here are some additional ways to market your notary business that will help you to increase your income.

Share
>

July 7, 2023

Tackling the Notary Path: How Hard Can it Be?

Filed under: Notary Public 101 — Tags: , — Tom Wilkins @ 12:00 am

Are you thinking about becoming a notary and trying to figure out how difficult the process is or what difficulties you may face in this career? While the requirements may vary by state, becoming a notary can be fulfilling. In this blog post, we’ll know how hard it is to become a notary and the necessary steps to become certified as a notary public. Learn about the responsibilities of individuals in the business, successful notary duties, and any potential biases or stereotypes in the field. Start your journey to becoming a Notary Public by gaining the necessary knowledge for advancement.

Understanding the Notary Role

Before delving into the process of becoming a notary, it is important to understand the role they play. A notary is a public officer appointed by the state government to witness the signing of important documents and administer oaths. They act as impartial witnesses to prevent fraud and ensure the validity and enforceability of legal documents.

Meeting the Requirements

The specific requirements to become a notary can vary depending on the jurisdiction, but there are commonalities across many regions. The process typically involves:

1. Age and Residency: Most jurisdictions require notaries to be at least 18 years old and legal residents of the state where they wish to practice.

2. Education and Background Check: Some states may require the completion of educational courses related to notary laws and procedures. Additionally, a background check may be necessary to ensure the applicant has no criminal history that could compromise their integrity as a notary.

3. Application and Fees: Aspiring notaries must submit an application to the appropriate regulatory authority and pay the associated fees. The application typically includes personal information, educational background, and any additional documentation the state requires.

4. Notary Exam: Several states require applicants to pass a notary exam to demonstrate their understanding of notary laws and practices. The exam may cover document types, identification requirements, and notarization procedures.

5. Bond and Insurance: Many states require notaries to obtain a surety bond and/or errors and omissions insurance. These serve as financial protection in case of errors or misconduct during notarial acts.

6. Commissioning and Renewal: Successful applicants receive their notary commission once all requirements are met. The commission is usually valid for four years, after which notaries must renew their commitment to continue practicing.

Navigating Challenges on the Path

While becoming a notary is generally straightforward, certain challenges may arise. Here are a few potential hurdles and tips to tackle them:

1. Understanding Legal Terminology: Notaries should familiarize themselves with legal terminology and document types commonly encountered in their jurisdiction. Taking educational courses or seeking guidance from experienced notaries can help.

2. Staying Updated with Laws and Regulations: Notary laws and regulations are subject to change. Aspiring notaries must try to stay updated with any amendments or new legislation that may affect their practice. Joining professional associations and attending seminars or workshops can provide valuable insights and networking opportunities.

3. Building a Client Base: Starting a notary business requires building a client base and establishing a reputation for reliability and professionalism. Networking with attorneys, real estate agents, and other professionals frequently requiring notarial services can help generate referrals and opportunities.

Embrace The Challenges And Reap The Rewarding Benefits

It’s hard to truly know how hard it is to become a notary without taking the first step. Becoming a notary in your state requires time and money, so it pays to know all the facts before diving in. It is easy to feel overwhelmed at the thought of navigating the path to becoming a notary because the requirements are strict, and understanding the full scope of what is expected can seem daunting. But don’t let that deter you from taking on this rewarding profession. By investing in yourself and understanding the ins and outs of becoming a notary, you can join this amazing world of public service experts! So, if you’re interested in joining the legal services industry but need help knowing where to start – take action now! If you’re trying to find a Notary Signing Agent near you, you can locate providers in your area on our website.

Share
>

June 23, 2023

What Sets a Mobile Notary Apart from a Notary

Filed under: Notary Public 101 — Tags: , — Tom Wilkins @ 12:00 am

When you need to have an important document notarized, you may wonder if you should go to a traditional notary public or use a mobile notary. While both types of notaries offer similar services, some key differences between the notary and mobile notaries may affect your decision. In this article, we will explore what sets a mobile notary apart from a notary and explain the benefits of using a mobile notary service.

Mobile Notary vs. Traditional Notary

A traditional notary public is a professional appointed by the state to verify signatures, administer oaths, and perform other duties related to the certification of documents. A traditional notary’s office is usually in a fixed location, such as a courthouse, bank, or law firm. Clients typically visit the notary’s place to complete their documents.

On the other hand, a mobile notary is a notary public who travels to the client’s location to notarize documents. They offer more flexibility regarding time and place, making it easier for clients to get their documents notarized when and where they need them.

The Distinction Between a Notary and a Mobile Notary

One of the most significant differences between a notary and a mobile notary is that a mobile notary can come to you. This means you don’t need to take time off work, travel to the notary’s location, or wait in long lines. Mobile notaries can visit your home, office, or any other convenient place.

Another difference is availability. Traditional notaries usually work regular business hours, which may not be convenient for people who work during the day. A mobile notary, however, can work outside of regular business hours and on weekends, making it easier for clients to get their documents notarized at a time that works for them.

Fees and Scheduling

Traditionally, notaries charge a flat fee per signature they notarize. On the other hand, mobile notaries usually charge an additional fee for travel time and expenses, which can vary depending on the distance traveled and the time of day. However, mobile notaries’ convenience and flexibility can outweigh this added expense.

Regarding scheduling, mobile notaries often offer more flexibility than traditional notaries. They can usually accommodate last-minute requests and work around your schedule, which can be especially helpful in urgent situations.

When to Use a Notary vs. When to Use a Mobile Notary

The choice between a traditional and mobile notary depends on your needs and circumstances. Suppose you have a document that needs to be notarized. Still, you have limited mobility or transportation options or need it done outside regular business hours. In that case, a mobile notary may be your best option. On the other hand, if you prefer to visit a fixed location and are willing to take time off work or wait in line, a traditional notary may work well for you.

Final Thoughts: Distinguishing Notary from Mobile Notary

Understanding the differences between a notary and a mobile notary is crucial when seeking reliable and convenient notarial services. While both are responsible for certifying documents, mobile notaries distinguish themselves by their ability to travel to clients’ preferred locations, offering flexibility and convenience. With the ever-increasing demand for efficient and accessible services, mobile notaries from Notaries/Signings are invaluable. Whether you require notarizations for personal or business matters, opting for a mobile notary ensures that your documents are handled with utmost care and convenience. Take advantage of the convenience and efficiency offered by mobile notaries and secure your notarial needs today.

Share
>
Older Posts »