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August 9, 2017

A sluggish Notary industry affects commenting on Facebook & Forums

Filed under: Social Media — admin @ 10:04 am

What is happening in the Notary industry? I remember the old days when tons of Notaries would comment on our forum all day long. They would discuss so many interesting topics to no end. But, it just started slowing down around 2009 after the lending bust. Many of our best signers have slowly been weeded out of the industry. Low-ball companies became the dominant force of the industry capitalizing on untrained newer Notaries who have the absolute worst stats on our site. SnapDocs became the ringleader of the art of low-balling.

We knew starting in 2009 that our forum would be a thing of the past, but that Linked In, Facebook and other mediums would grow in its place. This didn’t work out to be exactly true. The forum remains an effective and organized way to discuss signing companies by querying strings with keywords relating to particular companies. So, people still use the forum, but only for one purpose.

Facebook commenting is sluggish too. Back when we had 2000 followers we had lively conversations. Now we have 25,000 followers, but few posts get good interactions and creating discussions without posts is generally a losing proposition. Even our competitor Notary Rotary is slower, although they are the dominant force in Notary discussions, but the quality of the discussions isn’t necessarily good enough for me to want to read all the lame commentary.

I think it just shows that the dominant players in notary discussion groups were the seasoned players in the game. Half of them have been weeded out. The newbies comment at a rate of less than 1% per capita of how the experienced folks commented. This leads to an across the board decline in commenting on Facebook, Forums, Linked In, and anywhere else Notary discussions happen.

I hope that as a group, you can put a little more effort into making informative and polite comments to the various posts and discussion topics that we and others post. It makes the industry much nicer for society as a whole!

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August 8, 2017

What is someone signs in the wrong line in my Notary book?

Filed under: Technical & Legal — admin @ 9:57 am

We recently got a bunch of questions from newer Notaries about journals which were interesting. Here are the questions and my commentary.

1. What if someone signs in the wrong line in my Notary book?
If someone signs in the wrong line in your Notary journal, this poses a problem. If they signed above the journal entry in someone else’s entry, if it covers the other signature, that is a problem. Just cross out the wrong signature without defacing the signature that belongs there. On the other hand, if someone signs below in a blank journal entry, just cross the entire line of journal entry out and have them sign in the correct place. If you are doing a husband and wife notarization and you fill out your journal for all of the loan documents for each signer — and the husband signs where the wife is supposed to sign (but hasn’t yet) just cross out the entire entry, make a note of what happened in the journal and make a new entry for the one that got botched.

It is better to watch signers and use your finger to point to where they are supposed to sign as they will likely sign in the wrong place.

2. What if someone forgets to sign my Notary Journal?
If you are doing a notarization, you need to fill out your Notary journal BEFORE you stamp anything. Yes, you can fill out the Acknowledgment and Jurat forms before the notarization or before the person signs or swears under Oath. But, you cannot complete the notarization by signing your signature to the certificate or stamping until the person has signed your journal and the corresponding document.

If you make a mistake and forget to have someone sign your journal — call them up and go back. Get them to sign after the fact. That is better than not getting a signature at all. Tell them that their notarization could get “nullified” or not recognized if there is no signature in your book. In real life, a Notarization can only be “disqualified” after the fact if there is a formal investigation by an Attorney, investigator, Secretary of State, etc., who determines that the Notarization was done fraudulently or incompletely. So, you can scare them with this information and they will most likely be willing to sign your journal. However, don’t scare them unless they refuse to cooperate just to be polite!

3. What if I am signing two documents for two signers — how many journal entries?
Two documents that two signers will sign both of? That’s easy. That is two entries per person = FOUR journal entries. Just prepare all four journal entries with the name of each document and signer, plus all other pertinent and required information in each journal entry. Each person’s name will appear in two entries — one for each document.

Jan 1, 10am John Doe Ack Power of Attorney Address CA Dr. Lic 5553334 Exp.10-01-21 Fee… Signature Thumbprint
Jan 1, 10am John Doe Jurat Affidavit Ditto Ditto Fee… Signature. Thumbprint
Jan 1, 10am Sally Doe Ack Power of Attorney Address CA Dr. lic 1234566 Exp. 10-09-19 Fee. Signature. Thumbprint
Jan 1, 10am Sally Doe Jurat Affidavit Ditto Ditto Fee Signature … Thumbprint

You can NOT say ditto for the other signatures. Signatures must be signed. If your state law requires thumbprints on Powers of Attorney or Deeds, then do so for all entries for a Power of Attorney documents and Deeds. There is no penalty for always taking a thumbprint as it is prudent.

There is MORE… to be indicated in the journal entry than I indicated. Document Date, Notes about the signing that might help jog your memory after the fact.

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August 6, 2017

Is it better to piss a few people off, or protect society?

Filed under: Technical & Legal — Tags: , , , — admin @ 11:19 pm

The moral of the story is that it is good to look at situations in perspective, preferably a higher perspective. Most Notaries want to please their customers and the way they do their job is for that purpose only. As a Notary Public, your job is to serve the public and to obey the laws of your state. Additionally, you should follow best practices or prudent practices whether required by law or not simply to protect yourself and the public from fraud. The whole purpose in having Notaries is to deter and prevent fraud, so if you take short-cuts that make fraud easy, then there is no point in the existence of your profession.

Many companies discourage thumbprint taking
Many signing companies and title companies do not like Notaries asking for thumbprints because many borrowers don’t like being asked to give thumbprints. Nobody wants complaints. The state of Florida’s FAQ page stated that they did not want Notaries requiring thumbprints, however, they did not object to asking for thumbprints. Many Notaries in Texas claim that their state doesn’t allow thumbprinting. I’m not sure if this is correct or now. The fact is that many entities are against thumbprints since it takes private information from an individual and makes it available to others as well as the fact that many object to thumbprints as it is a pain in the neck (and wrist.)

Identity frauds get caught with thumbprints
Although many people are against thumbprints, many Notaries listed on 123notary claim that they assisted the FBI catch some heinous identity thieves, frauds, ponzi schemers (not to be confused with the Japanese ponzu sauce which is citrus and soy based.) and other bad guys. One Notary on our site help to get a guy nailed for 15 years of hard time who ruined the finances of presumably hundreds of unsuspecting victims. If it hadn’t been for that journal thumbprint that the Notary lady in question took, the FBI would not have been able to catch the fraud.

The Notary is normally considered a suspect
When the FBI interrogates a Notary Public, the Notary is considered a suspect. If you do not take proper journal records, it might appear that you are FACILITATING fraud by your lack of record keeping. Proper journal entries help uncover what happened at a Notary appointment. If an ID was forged, the information in your journal is useless unless you have a thumbprint which cannot be forged unless you are wearing a latex thumb-cover which would be easily detected by the notary. By not keeping a thumbprint you are facilitating the possibility of fraud. Additionally, keeping journal entries with multiple documents per journal entry raises the possibility that the Notary added extra documents to the journal entry after the fact and used them fraudulently which is why we recommend one journal entry per person per document in all cases even if that means you will have to buy a new journal every two weeks. You could be named as a suspect by the FBI or have to appear in court for a long time if there is identity fraud facilitated by your notary commission. A thumbprint is the single most easy and effective way to get judges, FBI agents and other investigators off your back and keep you out of court. I have heard first hand of many examples from our Notaries where they were off the hook due to proper record keeping who would have been in court WITHOUT PAY for a month if they did not keep good records.

Would you rather piss people off or protect society?
Let me ask you a question as a group. Pretend that over the next four years you will notarize 10,000 individuals. Pretend that ONE and only one of these individuals will be a really horrible identity thief who has victimized dozens of people, cheating them ouf of their life savings. Assume that by thumbprinting them, that when the FBI knocks on your door, your information will be the critical piece of evidence that will be used to nail that sucker and put him away for good. By helping nail that scoundrel you saved 21 more people who would have been financially ruined because of that joker. Pretend that 500 people and some of the companies you work for will COMPLAIN that you are taking thumbprints when it is not required by law except currently in California (hopefully subject to change in those other negligent states that should have their heads examined.) Is it worth pissing off 500 people in a small way to save 21 people from financial ruin and emotional devestation resulting from their victimization? My answer is — don’t let petty concerns get in the way of safeguarding society. Be a good citizen and keep your neighbor safe at night. If they protest being thumbprinted, tell them that someone could fake an ID and pretend to be them and steal all of the equity in their home — and that without a thumbprint the soundrel might never even get caught. Your signers will whistle a different tune when they think of themselves as a potential victim.

Summary
(a) You will notarize 10,000 people
(b) 1 will be a bad identity thief who will victimize 21 more people if not caught.
(c) You will piss off 500 individuals and a few companies by requiring thumbprints.
Is it worth upsetting 500 people in a small way to save 21 people from complete ruin?

Your job is not to be the detective, but to keep good records that the detectives can use to nail really really bad people. IMO it is worth upsetting a million people to save even one person from a serious act of identity theft! Society needs to be safe and feel safe. Do your part!

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August 5, 2017

Oaths and the art of improvisation

Jazz musicians are famous for their ability to improvise. Con-artists know how to ad-lib. Notaries are also required to know a little about improvisation. The problem is that the states require Notaries to know how to administer Oaths when those very same states do not instruct Notaries on the art of Oath giving.

Beginnings and endings
A good Oath begins with some formalities. Remember, that Oaths are by definition formal, and should be formal. Lying to a Notary Public under Oath is an act of perjury and should not be tolerated!

“Please raise your right hand. Do you solemnly swear… (body of Oath) so, help you God?”

There is a beginning of an Oath which must include the word “swear” otherwise in my book it isn’t an Oath. Then, the Oath should ideally end with so, help you God? For those who want to leave God out of it, you can administer an affirmation instead of an Oath which uses the word Affirm and refers to no God. However, you must NOT use the term affirm in an Oath. You cannot mix and match notarial acts and their respective verbiages. Oaths use the term swear, Affirmations use the term affirm, state, or perhaps attest.

Bodies of Oaths
The body of an Oath would really depend on the context. As an Oath creator, you have to create Oaths that are useful, and make sense based on the situation. Sometimes there is some prescribed wording that you must use. Using prescribed wording does not let you off the hook for understanding the Oath. You must understand the Oath and its parts otherwise you won’t know if the prescribed Oath makes sense or not. If there is no prescribed wording, you can ad-lib or use a cheat sheet. But, if you lose your cheat sheet and cannot perform, people will think you are an idiot, and I run into this problem with Notaries a lot. Below are some examples of how I would create an Oath for various purposes.

PLEASE RAISE YOUR RIGHT PAW!

Marriage
“Do you solemnly swear to take this man/woman as your lawfully wedded husband/wife for better or for worse, for richer or for poorer, in smartness and senility (let’s be realistic), until death do you part, so help you God/Godess?”

Oath of Office as a Notary Public.
“Do you solemnly swear that you will uphold all of the laws relating to Notaries Public in the state of California, and faithfully discharge your duties as a Notary Public for the duration of your term, so help you God, the Secretary of State, and perhaps the NNA Hotline (if they still have one?)”

Oath for Military
“Do you solemnly swear to defend the constitution of the United States for the duration of your term as a Military Officer in the United States Army and defend the USA against all enemies foreign and domestic, and not abandon your duties for light and transient causes (or loophole clauses), so help you God?”

Rental Oath for Agnostics
“Do you solemnly swear to be a good tenant in this apartment for the duration of your year lease, and thereafter if you should stay beyond the contracted terms of this agreement, so you help you God… if there is one?”

Jurat Oath
“Do you solemnly swear that the contents of this document are true and correct to the best of your knowledge and that you agree to and will abide by the terms within if any, so help you God?”

ID Oath
“Do you solemnly swear that this is a true identification card for you as an individual and that it was not forged, counterfeited or falsified in any way, shape or form, so help you God (and the DMV?)”

Court Oath
“Do you solemnly swear to tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth, so help you God?” (standardized wording here and not ad-libbed in this situation.)

COMMENTARY
Please notice that my Jurat Oath included the requried word, “swear” and refered to a particular document and not just to thin air. You swear to something particular and not to thin air.

Please also note that my Notary Oath included the term, the state in question, the act of defending the laws of the state and being dutiful in discharging your duties. It is important to mention all of the relevant components of what a person is swearing to. Can you picture a Notary Oath where the new Notary is only asked if they swear they will be a good Notary for an undefined period of time? Ludicrous!

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August 4, 2017

A Notary orders pizza during a signing using an app

Filed under: Humorous Posts — admin @ 9:19 am

Which Came First – The Wings/Pizza or the Signer?

Did you hear the one about the notary who ordered pizza and chicken wings with an app before a signing, with the intent they would arrive there shortly after he did? You’re about to.

It turns out the wings didn’t exactly fly over and the pizza didn’t get there in 30 minutes or less. So the notary was finished with the signing and the signer wanted him out of there. But wait – wings and a pizza were coming. Not to mention, thanks to its lateness, a free pizza! The signer didn’t want the notary in his house, nor the food. Especially since he was a vegetarian. So that’s why he looks younger than the date on his driver’s license indicated, thought the notary. Couldn’t he just stick around outside and wait for the food, asked the growingly hungry notary? No, said the signer. He doesn’t allow himself within a mile of any food whose parent had a face. What about heads, as in heads of lettuce? The signer didn’t appreciate the notary’s sarcasm.

If only the notary ordered mushrooms on his pizza instead of pepperoni, he’d at least be able to scarf that down. Guess again, said the signer. Cheese is made from milk, which comes from cows, whose fathers had faces.

Ding-Dong! It must the pizza/chicken wing delivery guy!

Signer: “You can’t open that door.”

Notary: “Please! I’m starving.”
Signer: “What part of ‘can’t’ don’t you understand?!”

Unfortunately, it wasn’t the pizza/chicken wing delivery guy. It was the signer’s friend coming over to watch TV. The notary begged to watch with them till his food arrived. Suddenly the signer had a change of heart.

Signer: “Watch TV? Sure, be my guest!”

The horrifying conclusion to this story – The signer and his friend were cannibals. Vegetarian cannibals. When the notary watched crap on TV with them, he was, in effect, “vegging”. An hour later, the food was delivered. The signer and his friend told the delivery boy they were FULL. The notary was never heard from again. You might say his fate was SIGNED, sealed and delivered.

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August 3, 2017

Black Notaries vs. White Notaries: The Notary Manual

Filed under: Humorous Posts — admin @ 9:55 am

Black Notaries vs. White Notaries: The Notary Manual

TEACHER: Hello class. We are gathered here today to talk about Notary terms, and the state Notary manual. But, first I would like to ask what the manual means to you.

SHELLY: I see a short book designed to teach the Notaries of tomorrow the rules of the road in order to safeguard the integrity of notarized transactions which protects society at large in a broader sense.

TEACHER: Very good Shelly! And very wonky.

KIM JONG “AKA Korean mom”: It’s so very difficult to understand. Half the terms don’t show up in my English-Korean dictionary. What a pain! I have to use my English dictionary and then translate the words in the definition into Korean to figure it out. How will I pass my test? I tried to use that as an excuse to get out of jury duty but they chose me anyway until they found out I didn’t understand any of the legal terms they used! Like “If it doesn’t fit, you must acquit.”

TEACHER: Okay, just let me know if there are any terms that I can explain to you. I may not understand Korean, but I can break the complicated terms down in an understandable way.

SHALONDA: I see three things. (1) I see a technical manual that teaches the state & civil laws affecting Notaries public, and more that could help Notaries deter fraud, keep transactions official, and keep paperwork straight. (2) A book that teaches the how-to of doing daily Notary work and (3) A book full of new names for black people to name their kids — you know what I’m saying?

TEACHER: Well, I hadn’t thought about it like that before.

SHALONDA: Oh yeah. I named my kids after Notary terms several years ago. Jurat and Venue… that’s short for Venuetta.

SHELLY: Do you swear under Oath you named your kid Jurat?

SHALONDA: I most certainly do (raising her right hand). But, Jurat is more of a jokester. He doesn’t have a solemn bone in his body. The tread on his boots is shaped like a Notary seal, and he was playing outside after it was raining. It looked like we had impressions of notary seals all through the house. I told him to take his boots off after that.

SHELLY: All of this studying for the Notary exam is tiring. I heard that reading too much can be bad for your eyesight. No wonder Trump doesn’t need glasses.

KIM JONG: I know. That’s why my kid Myong is forbidden to study more than six hours a night. We are recommending dropping his study time from seven hours to five hours and forty-five minutes with the last forty-five minutes mostly study-oriented games, songs or something where he is not staring at a book or computer.

SHELLY: Well we were going to increase Tommy’s study time from forty minutes to an hour and twenty minutes after we found out how hard college is. But, we don’t want him to ruin his eyes, so we’ll compromise at seventy minutes a day.

KIM JONG: How will he possibly compete with those studying five hours a day?

SHELLY’s HUSBAND: She has a point. Tommy will never survive in college unless he studies more. What he does now will affect him for the rest of his life. And if he does poorly in school like my brother, then he might get stuck driving a garbage truck for the rest of his life. Or an Uber.

SHELLY: Or worse — he might have to become a Notary. What has four wheels and flies?

SHALONDA: Ooh! I know this one! A garbage truck.

KIM JONG: No, that’s the junior high version of the joke! The answer in this context is a Notary who is late to a signing because he would be driving so fast!

SHALONDA: Good point. Not funny point, but good. But, honestly, to be a Notary you need to study too. In some states you need to study at least 30 hours to pass the Notary test and then another 30 hours to be a good signing agent. This profession isn’t for jokes — that is if you want to succeed in it. And by the way, you should say what has four wheels and screeches, because when you round those corners, you’re gonna be screeching those tires, girl.

TEACHER: Well class, we do seem to be diverging now don’t we. Being a Notary is a very honorable and noble profession and not for those who lack character. No wonder Trump was never a Notary.

SHALONDA: But, it is for those who lack a high school diploma. There is no educational standard for this job other than passing a test. California, Louisiana and New York make the test hard. But, the other states will just hand out seals to any fool who applies. Like Presidential Seals. Where’s the nobility in that?

TEACHER: Good point. Well, in theory it is supposed to be noble.

SHELLY: Theory doesn’t cut it when a clueless Notary assists a fraud in stealing the Title to your house.

TEACHER: You’re right. Maybe having a longer course than our six hour course would help. Perhaps a background screening too not just for being a signing agent, but for being a Notary.

SHALONDA: In California, the FBI, DOJ, and KGB all check us, but in these other states there doesn’t seem to be a system of checks and balances.

KIM JONG: Perhaps, being a Notary should be regulated federally instead of by a bunch of irresponsible states who can’t keep anything straight. And that wasn’t a reference to the gay parts of California.

TEACHER: Well perhaps you’re right. In any case, let’s practice notarizing a Jurat.

SHALONDA: You’re going to notarize my daughter?

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July 31, 2017

When a Title company lies to you

Filed under: Marketing Articles — admin @ 10:46 am

In real life, people lie. It is unethical, and should be avoided. After all, your actions determine the type of world you live in. Every time you perform an action, you should ask yourself, if everybody did what I am going to do, would that be the type of world I want to live in?

But, what types of lies do Title companies tell you? You would be surprised.

One Notary had an incident where she was told she forgot to put a stamp on a particular acknowledgment for a document. After checking her records for that particular loan, it turned out there was no document by that name in the package — she had been lied to! (gasp)

Another Notary was told that they did not need to have the borrowers sign the 1003 Universal Loan Application. There are multiple places to sign. After the fact that Notary got in trouble for not having it signed. If you get unusual instructions that don’t seem right, better get them in writing, or perhaps just rely on your instincts (if you have instincts — what am I a cat?)

One Notary keeps a copy of all the documents in a package on a flash drive to prove if a document wasn’t really in a particular package.

Once an Escrow officer with bubbly handwriting forged my signature and made a photocopy of my seal. I explained to the investigating officer that I don’t make bubbles to dot my i’s, and that it must have been done by a 19 year old girl in his office who goofed on something and had to get something notarized fast!

I heard that once a Title company claimed that a copy of the ID was not included in the package. Keep in mind that multiple hands touch loan documents at title companies, and it is possible for one of those hands to misplace a document in the shuffle.

Lost cashier’s checks? I always attach these to a piece of paper and put it in the front of the package so they won’t get lost. But, title companies still lose $10,000 checks. You just can’t just Mortgage professionals. Half of them are a bunch of dummies! And they normally fail my test too after they convince me how smart they are!

The truth is that you might be asked to go out free of charge to redo the document that you “missed.” What a corrupt way to con a Notary. I missed two seals in 4000 signings in my signing career. So, I might not believe them if they claimed I missed something. I triple checked my work. Only when there was a confusion on a day I was tired and running around like a chicken with its head cut off — that is the only time I might have made a mistake of some sort.

And by the way — it is illegal to send a loose Acknowledgment in the mail if it is stamped. It needs to be stapled to the document it is associated with.

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July 28, 2017

The Mafia Notary with the violin case (and wine)

Filed under: Humorous Posts — admin @ 9:04 am

There once was a Notary named Giuseppe. He liked to dress nice to signings. He wore a pinstriped suit, a white tie, a hat, and very shiny Italian shoes. He would even bring a nice bottle of wine from Piedmont, Italy to the signing with a case for several wine glasses.

But, Giuseppe always arrived at signings with a violin case. The borrowers asked if he was a musician. He said, that this was where he kept his Notary seal and pads of certificates. He also offered other services.

“Just let me know if you ever need a body to disappear. I know people who can make that happen — capiche? Or if you don’t want a credible witness to testify, I have ways of keeping people quiet – you know?”

The borrowers got creeped out by this character and complained one after another to the signing companies. But, the signing companies kept hiring Giuseppe because he was never late.

But, then one day came when he was 20 minutes late to a signing. That was the one day when he had to “take care of business.” He picked his daughter up from school, drove a few miles East, knocked someone off with his daughter sitting in the car not suspecting a thing, and then went to the signing.

After a while, the signing companies all started talking to each other and decided not to use him. But, Giuseppe needed a front for his other businesses. What would he do? He decided to work for the Notaries. He was an expert at collections in addition to doing flawless Notaries. All of the signing companies who fired him would soon regret, as he would be collecting from them on behalf of all the Notaries out there who weren’t getting paid.

His new career worked out well until one day, someone from New Branch Signing Service was found buried up to their neck in concrete. There was only one suspect, but not a single witness. Miraculously, the guy who got charged for the murder was another guy who the signing company owed money to for doing a construction job. He had no alibi. So, the moral of the story is, always pay your Notaries and… never fire a guy who wears a white tie!

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July 27, 2017

Punch your client’s ticket

Filed under: Ken Edelstein — admin @ 10:44 am

PUNCH your client’s Ticket
Those of us who grew up watching Black & White TV, and carried books made of paper to class; are aware of technologies unknown to the PC / IOS / Android / Virtual Reality generation.

You are probably familiar with a hand held hole puncher. They are still used in NY State by Motor Vehicle Inspection stations. They punch out the expiration month of the sticker that goes on the windshield. Only one hole is permitted so a simple round hole will do. Other hand held punches were different. They, as used by railroads had a variety of punch out designs. EBay “hand held railroad punch” to see many.
This “ancient technology” can be used by notaries to advantage. Offer your client every 5th visit at half price. Or, perhaps free on the 10th visit – their choice. When you present your business card use a “Railroad Punch” with a unique design to punch a hole in the business card that you leave with the client. Choose a really interesting punch out design. Take care that you do not punch over your phone number; you want your client to be able to call again!

On each subsequent visit, punch an additional hole. The unique shapes available on old Railroad punches are virtually impossible to duplicate. Even with a razor blade it’s just not doable.

Why this really works. You are giving them something unique – nobody else that your client knows markets in this manner. Speaking of unique – that punched hole truly IS unique. They will keep your card just because of the punch-out!

It’s also a secure technology. A railroad ticket would be good for the lowest fare punched. Once the conductor punched a ticket, even an exact duplicate of the punch would be useless. A very simple and practical protection against raising the value of the ticket. Punching a higher value would be useless, and punching a lower value would be pointless.

Thus, your client would not be able to manipulate your business card to receive unearned freebies. Moving past the security aspect; the “collector instinct” in all of us “kicks in”. It’s just human nature to want to accumulate additional punches. Perhaps for a really big (expensive) job you punch twice?

Giving clients a freebie or discount is nothing new. What is new is the uniqueness of this approach, they have not seen it before – that makes you memorable. And, being memorable is what you want. It’s possible to take the concept to a higher level. Custom hole punchers are available, but tend to be rather expensive. I can picture a miniature notary seal, an embosser; whatever you can imagine.

Be a neat hole puncher. Client involvement in the process, cements it into their memory. Ask for the garbage can and punch out the “chad” into the garbage – not on the floor or their desk. Similar to the effect of embossing, a quality die punching leave a great impression (actually in this case – the lack of an impression). But, I digress.

Don’t get carried away with the puncher – “marking” the pages you notarize with your hole puncher is a very bad idea. Use it only on the business card you distribute. Putting in that first punch and explaining the benefits of acquiring additional punches is a great way to spend a few additional moments with your new repeat client. They will be amused and you will profit.

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July 26, 2017

Most of what Jeremy & Carmen at 123notary offer all day is FREE.

Filed under: Social Media — admin @ 10:54 am

People complain that prices on 123notary are expensive. But, they are complaining that the top placements are expensive. They should be. There can only be a single #1 spot in any particular area, and lots of people want it. Limited supply, and plenty of demand. But, lots of other things on 123notary are free. Here are some free things that 123notary offers.

Helpline
We have no official helpline, but customers call in and talk to Carmen, and write in seeking help with technical Notary and signing agent issues as well as marketing strategy. We are happy to help because that is our reason for being (in addition to having the sea bass tempura sushi roll at Robata Grill down the street — my other reason for being.)

Free listings
People who are not sure about 123notary can usually get a free listing. We restrict free listings in busy areas, but we do make exceptions if you write a great notes section for your future listing. Whomever said there is nothing for free out there doesn’t understand the directory business. Most online directories offer most of their listings for free, but not the good listings at the top. Your free listings also offer you freedom — another way to be free, as you can write what you like in your notes section as long as it is appropriate, topical, and as long as big brother doesn’t mind.

Notes Makeovers
Jeremy is happy to give your notes section a free lookover and make suggestions on what to add, or reorganize it for you. People who get makeovers get about 50% more clicks on average simple because their listing makes a much better impression after the fact and is so much easier to process the data when organized well. Notes makeovers are free — get one today! (eyeliner and foundation sold separately)

Blogucation
Most Notaries have to pay to get courses so they can learn something. However, at 123notary, we feel that what people learn in courses is not enough. If you take a course, your brain will close up after you finish studying. It is better that you keep learning and learn a broad diversification of Notary and Signing Agent topics. Our blog covers marketing, technical, industry news, Notary comedy and much more to keep you at the top of your game. Many Notaries learn more from our blog than they learned from any course — and it’s free! We should probably create a test based purely on blog topics to make sure people are reading! Just don’t get your mind “blogged down” by overdosing on our content!

Contacting Delinquent Listings
Jeremy contacts people daily who have not logged into their free or paid listing. We also contact people with blank notes sections. If anything is wrong with your listing, we will eventually contact you. We are always watching. It’s easier if you just login to your listing more than a logger named Tim Burr does logging in to his listing (if they have listings.)

Answering dumb questions for the public
Since we have such a comprehensive list of signing companies, and since our number is on the left site of the page template, we get dumb people calling in all day assuming we are FASS, or Nation’s Direct. It takes a lot of reasoning to convince them that we are not, and that if they want to sue a particular signing company for not paying them, to have their Attorney find the correct signing company to sue and to stop bothering us. This work is courtesy of Carmen. Part of the problem is that we don’t always list the phone numbers for the signing companies on our listings, while we do list the address and web address. Maybe we should be more comprehensive.

In short, most of what Jeremy and Carmen do all day is free for the public. So, how do we make our money? People buy fancy top listings from us. Ask us if a top spot is available in your area. And remember, if a tree falls in the forest and nobody heard it fall, it didn’t really make a noise. And if you have a listing at the bottom of the list that nobody sees, it is as good as not existing until you upgrade to the top spot!

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