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January 28, 2011

A tale of four notaries in hospitals

 A tale of four notaries and their adventures at hospitals.
 
Hospital notarizations are very tricky and there is a lot that can go wrong. We have several resource pages regarding hospital notarizations to steer notaries away from pitfalls.  The characters in this story are NOT based on real characters, but each one of them has either a single attitude or attribute that is similar to a real person that I am acquainted with.  This silly story will show how each notary fared and how their way of thinking worked in the long run.  The various notaries include an Arkansas notary, an Illinois notary, a Florida notary, and a Pennsylvania notary public.
 
(1) Jeremy Blunt, a notary in Arkansas was called to do a hospital notarization in Little Rock on the following day.  Jeremy, with his blunt, but thorough manner told them, “Make sure to tell the nurses not to drug the patient within eight hours of the signing.”.  The caregiver, who was happy to have a thorough notary, overlooked Jeremy’s blunt manner and was very willing to coordinate a temporary lapse in morphine, so that the signer (an elderly relative) would be able to sign the papers.  Jeremy called an hour before the signing to have the caregiver read the ID information to him, and had the caregiver verify that the signer had not been drugged recently, was awake and able to conversate, and wouldn’t be drugged until after the notarization, and that the nurses had been informed.  The caregiver was standing next to the bedridden signer to MAKE SURE that no intravenus drugs were given.
 
Jeremy arrives at the signing with his notary bag, records the ID in his journal, gets a signature in his journal and the document(s), fills out the certificate form(s), stamps them, affixes his official Arkansas notary seal, staples the documents together, and is done.  Jeremy gets his fee, thanks everyone in a very blunt way, and leaves.  The signers say, “That Jeremy gets the job done — he’s a bit blunt, but polite, and he saved our rear ends big time!!!  That OTHER notary let us down.  Thank god for good notaries!”
 
(2) Linda Liberty, a notary in Illinois was called to do a hospital notarization in Chicago the following day.  Since she had a strict policy of not butting into anyone’s medical business, not asking questions, and minding her own business, she omitted to ask the caregiver if the signer was on medication.  After, all thats NONE OF MY BUSINESS!  The next day, she gets to the hospital, the caregiver says, “Thank you for coming”.  Linda politely says, “Its my pleasure to serve the public wholeheartedly”.  Linda goes to the hospital room where the patient / signer is.  The patient is high on morphine and in a stupor, barely able to keep his eyes open. Linda says, “Sorry, but according to Illinois notary laws, I am not authorized to notarize someone who is not capable of thinking or communicating coherently.  I can not notarize this person in this condition, ID or no ID.  The caregiver (the daughter of the signer) said, gee, thats too bad.  Linda says, my travel fee is $60 for hospitals please.  The daughter says, “BUT, YOU DIDN”T DO ANYTHING”.  Linda Liberty says, “Excuse me, but I drove an hour and a half here in traffic, paid a toll for the bridge, sat here talking to you for twenty minutes, paid $15 for gas, and have an hour drive home. I did quite a bit and I want to get paid!!!”  The daughter said, sorry, but we can not pay you.  We are very sorry.
 
(3) Ralph Machiavelli, a notary in Florida (no relation to Niccolo… at least not by blood), got a call to do a signing of a power of attorney in a hospital in Tampa.  The power of attorney would be for the signer’s son in law to take over all of his banking and real estate transactions. Ralph had lots of experience and thought ahead.  This Florida notary public had had his fingers burned a few times and knew the techniques for keeping out of trouble and getting paid.  Ralph told the client that he collects a $75 travel fee at the door BEFORE he sees the signer.  He, then charges $10 per for stamp for an acknowledged signature which is the maximum allowed fee in Florida.  The son in law of the signer agreed, and they set the appointment for the next day at 10am.
 
Ralph gets to the appointment.  Collects his travel fee in CASH, and says, “Thank you very much”.  Lets see the signer now.  The two of them proceed to walk down the long corridor, around some bends, up an elevator, down another corridor, past a nurse station, to the left, to the right, and then into a room.  They found the signer was drugged, sleeping, and in no condition to sign or even talk.  The son in law tried to wake the signer up.  The signer eventually woke up after twenty minutes of blinking and saying, “mmmmmmm?”.   Ralph said, can you ask dad to sign this form?  The son in law said, I’ll try.  After twenty additional minutes of wasting time (a result of the medication), the son in law said, its no use, they drugged him this morning.  Maybe I have my $75 back?  Ralph says, “I’m sorry, but in addition to traveling, I spent forty minutes here waiting for your signer to sign something.  This was a complete waste of time.  Next time please make sure your dad is ready to sign at the appointed time. That means…. NO DRUGS”.  Ralph returns home with his money.  He pleasures himself with a nice baby back rib dinner, and then returns home.
 
(4) Sharisse Washington, Pennsylvania Notary Public at large, doesn’t stand for this type of nonsense or bluntness that happened in the above three stories.  She has thirty years of experience, and carries a handheld database of how to handle each situation with all its variations and pitfalls.  Sharisse minds her p’s and q’s, dots her i’s and crosses her t’s.  She informs everybody in a polite way, and doesn’t put herself in a position that anything will go wrong either.   This notary in Pennsylvania gets a call to go to a Philadelphia hospital to do a notarization the next day.  She politely asks the client if they have an ID for the signer.  She asks if they could read the ID to her, so that she can verify that they have the ID, and that its current.  She asks if the patient EVER recieves medication or is likely to receive it during the day of the signing. She asks if its possible that they could provide a “WINDOW OF TIME”, where they could be sure that the signer wasn’t going to be drugged.  She asks what the name and type of the document is.  She asks if it is in their possession and if they can read the document to her (so, she can verify that they really have it).  After she asks all of the questions on her database’s check list, the cordially thanks the client for answering her questions and assures them that she will be at the hospital lobby at 10am the following day. 
 
This Pennsylvania Notary calls at 9am to verify that they have the identification handy and that the signer is not drugged. Sharisse shows up at the hospital at 9:55 just to be on the safe side.  The client is there, thanks her for being early.  They go up to the room.  The signer is awake, sober, and conversational.  The signer signs the document and journal. Its a bit if a struggle being old and being weak, but the signer does it… because she is sober and awake… and sober…not drugged.   Sharisse does all of the remaining necessary paperwork, thanks everybody, collects her fee, and is off to her next appointment which she allowed a sufficient amount of time to get to.
 
Now that you have read how each of these four notaries handled a hospital job, its up to you to decide how you want to handle this type of job. Remember, that hospital and jail notary jobs and many more potential pitfalls and things that can go wrong than a regular office or home notary job.  Do your homework, be polite and stay out of trouble, and that way, you will be able to make a living. Otherwise, it is you who will be sorry.

You might also like:

Power of Attorney in a nursing home
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=2305

Do you like your job? A story of being kept waiting forever at a hospital.
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=617

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January 3, 2021

How do you define “pandemic?”

Filed under: General Stories — admin @ 12:08 am

What is a pandemic, and how do you know you are in one.

LADY: How can you go to work when we are in the middle of a pandemic?
GUY: How do you define pandemic?
LADY: Lots of people are dying. It’s an emergency!!!

There are several facts one should know about pandemics, particularly the “fakedemic” we are in now.

1. Covid19 is real, but only has a high death rate for people over 70, and a few very vulnerable people younger than that.

2. Hospitals get paid several thousand extra per death if they record the death as a Covid19 death. This could be considered bribery, or an invitation to corruption.

3. There are no definitive standards for what constitutes a Covid19 death. Many (roughly 25%) of the Covid deaths happened without the dead party being proven positive for Covid19.

4. The remaining 75% of Covid19 deaths consist of:
People who had Covid before , got over it, and died of something else
People who had Covid, but got hit by a bus, had a motorcycle accident, etc.
Those who had Covid but died of another lung complication such as the flu, or pneumonia
People who died solely of Covid which account for roughly 1-3% of the grand total of Covid19 Deaths.

5. The real total of people who died solely of Covid might be around 20,000, and those who died primarily of Covid might be about 40,000 to 80,000, but not whatever the total is these days which is coming up to 300,000 in the USA.

6. According to Judaism, a Pandemic is defined as an infectious disease that kills 3 in 500 people per day. In California Covid19 kills less than 2 people per Million per day. We would need 4000x the quantity of deaths (not cases) to qualify as a pandemic according to Judaism.

7. According to common sense, a Pandemic would be a situation where all hospitals are overflowing, the military is there, constant sirens, ambulances, helicopters moving the sick to where they could be cared for and moving the dead around. During the worst of the “pandemic” in NYC they did have bodies stacked up in the morgue, and overflowing hospitals. But, they did not use military hospitals. The rest of the country did not have such a drastic or desperate situation.

8. I see a pandemic of insanity, madness, and a lack of common sense. People believe everything the biased lamestream media tells them without scrutinizing the information or comparing it to other sources. We have fake pandemics, fake elections, fake news, fake impeachments, fake genders, and fake food. We seek to solve our pandemic with a man-made fake solution, namely a vaccine.

9. This plandemic is more like a horror movie where the evil scientist with a German accent creates a deadly virus, and has the cure for it locked up in a freezer compartment looking forward to selling it at a huge margin. But, in the end of such movies, the mad scientist gets locked up and the resilient people recover. In our case, the mad scientists are in China and backed by God knows who. I don’t see them going to jail.

10. Due to this plandemic, America has forgotten the hundreds of thousands of brave souls who fought so that we could have freedom, a constitution, and rule of law. Now, we are living under tyranny. States are putting respectable businesses in the food and entertainment industry permanently out of business all in the name of “safety.” The bigger problem is that the system of checks and balances doesn’t seem to be functioning. The courts let governors act as emperors and the people do not complain too loudly, even in gun toting redneck states (yee-haw).

Summary
Unless the people wake up and decide that yes, the constitution, liberty, freedom from tyranny, and a good economy matter (just as much as black lives matter), then we will either not have a country much longer, become Marxist, or have a broken economy, political system, and everything else. We are moving fast in that direction .But, why? Because of a pandemic of irrational thinking, a lack of common sense, and a hundred-fold overreaction to Covid Covid, oh my God Covid!

According to Judaism, the spiritual root of infections diseases are:
1. Improper use of speech such as slander, lying, jealousy, abusive speech and others.
2. Improper sexual behavior such as premarital sex, homosexual behavior, etc.
3. Violent behavior. In America there is a lot of spousal abuse, child trafficking, gang violence, etc.

A vaccine can save you from this current pandemic (maybe), but will not save you from God. If God feels you go around lying, cheating, slandering, and bearing false witness against your neighbor which has been huge, especially in politics since 2014 (much huger than normal in my opinion) then he will get you some other way. You can hide fro Covid, but you cannot hide from God

The contents of this article are some high quality, analytical, back to reality and solid spiritual principles which even atheists can get at least on a moral level. Only 20% of Americans (rough estimate) are thinking logically, the others are completely impossible to reason with and let their fear and emotions dictate their opinions. I do not feel it is safe to have your life run by a majority of insane lunatics. Think deeply about what I just said.

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June 4, 2020

Notary shuts down biz because he cares more about lives than money

Filed under: General Stories — Tags: , , — admin @ 6:22 am

A Notary on Twitter claims that he shut down his notary business due to the Covid-19 virus. He claims that he did this because he cares more about saving lives than about making money.

But, if everyone stopped going to work to save lives, the supermarkets would be closed. The hospitals would all shut down. And all over services would not be available. What if someone would die because they could not reach a notary in time. Would you still be saving lives?

And you need to still make a living even if there is a disease going around. You can’t just stop living unless you are definitely infected — and in that case stay home for 14 days or so.

This notary was virtue signalling himself and patting himself on the back in a self-righteous way. But, he criticized me for being an immoral person for suggesting that he stay open. Later on he revealed that he hardly does any notary work anyway.

The moral of this story is that stopping functioning will not make this disease go away. Staying away from places where people are densely populated with poor ventilation might help. And social distancing might help too.

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March 17, 2020

Coronavirus – how it affected me and my recommendations

Filed under: General Stories — Tags: , , — admin @ 6:10 am

Since I work from home and have savings, I don’t think I will personally be too badly affected by the Coronavirus.

But, today, I was subjected to a rude awakening. Public schools, universities, bars, clubs, restaurants, etc., have all been closed other than for restaurant take out. The restaurants were functioning at 10% of capacity when they were allowed to have dine in guests. However, in other parts of California the restaurants are still open based on a conversation I had using my fluent Mandarin Chinese (thank you, thank you, you may applaud… okay, that’s enough applauding.).

At Whole Foods, they were out of almost everything I normally get. I had to get chocolate flavored hazelnut milk rather than my usual vanilla almond milk. Unfortunately I use the milk with cereal and juice and was not sure how the chocolate would mix. It mixed well with Cherry juice which is one of the things the supermarket actually had in good quantity.

I invented the term Frankenstonian that is kind of like Draconian, but involves more “experiments” done with a German accent and the announcement, “It’s alive— ya!”

I got to see what other supermarkets are like in my quest to find toilet paper and wound up finding a far superior brand of pumpkin pie.

But, I was so sad walking around thinking of all the laid off bar tenders, waiters, and airlines staff that I actually almost started to cry. I was so depressed.

So, it hasn’t been all bad. But, here is my view on the policies.

COVID-19 is like a tsunami.
The “experts” say they are trying to reduce the height of the tsunami of infections by introducing draconian measures to create social distancing. I agree with social distancing if it can be done in a way that doesn’t cripple the economy which will have a domino effect and could land us in a depression or broke as a nation. The reason we are in this problem is that most countries including the USA do not have enough ICU rooms or ventilators. Why are we realizing this now? In my opinion, wars, earthquakes and disease outbreaks happen on a regular basis and therefor we should have locations for makeshift hospitals and RESERVE WORKERS for hospitals just like the military has. America is always ready for war, but never ready to take care of its citizens.

So, the strategy is to do permanent damage to children by hampering their education. Kids are dumb enough as it is with school, imagine how dumb they will be missing an entire year. We are taking two weeks off as a precautionary move. But, two weeks later nothing will improve, but lots of damage to the economy and lots of frustrated people, and lots of dumb kids. The tsunami is still coming, delayed perhaps by a few days, and its height will be far above our capacity to deal with it even if we delay it.

The damage from the tsunami is bad enough on its own, but now we will triple the damage by ruining our robust economy because we can’t control a tiny little virus with all of our technology and medical knowledge. Unbelievable. Am I supposed to put my faith in science after all of this nonsense?

My Recommendations for “dealing” with Covid-19
1. Have manufacturing plants for respirators, masks and Purell working 48 hours per day (if that’s possible)
2. Use prefab buildings and create a makeshift hospital near an airport or on a military base.
3. Create an army of reserve medical staff who are somewhat skilled in handling emergencies.
4. Let it rip – then we will have the mechanism to treat the ill and all of these quarantines will no longer be necessary.

I think at some point we need to let nature take its course. The angels want to do a cleanup of some of the negative spiritual forces in the planet, and outbreaks are one of the ways they do it. Personally I think they should use bolts of lightning. But, in a candid interview with an angel recently mentioning the lightning, the angel replied, “Nah, that’s old school, we prefer infectious diseases — that’s what’s in now. Thousands of people get infected, but we decide who will die. With lightning, it’s too hard to aim, plus you can only use it when people are outside in thudnderstorm.”

In the mean time, back to my chocolate hazelnut milk. That stuff is so good, that I am not minding this emergency of epidemic proportions as much.

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March 7, 2020

Compilation of best blog articles from 2011

Filed under: Compilations — admin @ 10:03 am

PRICING

Pricing for notary work: Different strokes for different folks
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=697

Pricing formulas and time spent
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=588

Payment terms set by buyer or seller?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=1812

TECHNICAL

Notarize just the name.
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=15817

Decline profitable junkwork
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=15495

A tale of four notaries at hospitals
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=463

Things that get notaries complaints
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=639

What to say and what not to say
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=628

Do you like your job?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=617

Dragging the person’s arm
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=610

Seal Forgery – it happened to me
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=724

Leave a few spaces open in your journal?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=714

Fixing botched signings
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=1246

Notary certificates, notary wording & notary verbiage
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=1834

Can a notary get in trouble?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=1745

The signing agent loan signing process & pitfalls
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=2780

How do I fill in a journal entry?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=1725

Notarizing multi-page documents
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=1706

Thumbprinting step by step
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=1689

STORIES

Notarizing a kidnapper
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=676

The story of 123notary
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=710

A few testimonials about 123notary
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=700

Notarizing an arsonist who blew his fingers off
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=650

The signing from hell
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=765

Notary in Louisiana murdered in home invasion
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=925

Notary pushed off stairs by borrower
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=1097

COMEDY

Welcome to the Notary Hotel
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=8822

You know you’re a notary when…
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16038

Jeremy’s visit to hell
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20412

A tough act to follow
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=6579

I have a dream – notary version
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19207

Notarization on the Steve Harvey show
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=13704

Notary suicide hotline
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=6995

Notary reviews vs. Movie Reviews
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=8820

Notary Airport
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=17062

My date with Jeremy
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=4473

Borrower etiquette from A to Z
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=2995

Vampire Notaries – 24 hour service
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=4094

Bartender Notary – a reverse mortgage on the rocks
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=4080

Best excuses why a signing company didn’t pay a notary
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=1922

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February 5, 2020

Best older posts about how to write a great notes section

Filed under: Your Notes Section — admin @ 10:59 pm

Here are some older posts about how to write a great notes section. I wanted to bring these to the surface, so here they are.

.
COMPREHENSIVE GUIDES

.
How to write a notes section if you are a beginner
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16698

Everything you need to know about writing a great notes section
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16074

Notary Marketing 102 – your notes section
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19788

.
INTERESTING ARTICLES ABOUT NOTES SECTIONS AS A WHOLE

.
2014 Excerpts from great notes sections
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=13613

The ADD culture and your listing and notary marketing
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22309

Documenting your experience and personal style in your notes
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19052

Documenting your experience and personal style in your notes
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19052

Notary notes makeover
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=18895

Examples of great notes sections
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=18862

Unique phrases from the Ninja course
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=14690

10 quick changes to your notes that double your calls
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=4499

What goes where in your notes?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=1076

Clarifying vague claims in your notes section
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=4675

Your jumbled or too short notes section is costing you 50% of your business
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16572

.
COMPONENTS OF A NOTES SECTION

.
A list of things you probably did not add to your notes section
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=22287

How many types of financial packages do you mention?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19997

Putting jails and hospitals in your notes section
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19266

Is it better to be “bilingual” or speak Spanish?
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19264

Being unique and factual in your notes section
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19050

Buzzwords to avoid in your notes section
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19054

What NOT to put at the top of your notes section
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19056

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December 28, 2019

Alzheimer’s signings — how to determine whether to carry through or not?

Filed under: Hospital & Jail Signings — admin @ 11:07 pm

Let’s say you are at a hospital for a POA signing or Medical Directive signing. Let’s say that the signer has been officially diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. Do you notarize or not? If you notarize, and the signing comes back to haunt you in court, the small fee you made will not be worth any significant risk of court time. However, if you can get the signer to describe the document, why they are signing it, who they are, who their relatives are, and who the president of the United States is, they are probably competent enough to sign.

Now, let’s say that a medical professional at the hospital advises you not to notarize for the patient due to this mental disease. The fact is that you are the Notary, and only you can decide the fate of the notarization. The main thing is to consider the risks, and how you can go about proving competency in a prudent way.

I would continue writing about this article, but I forgot what the topic was. Hmm.

You might also like:

12 questions to ask for hospital notarizations
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20519

A tale of four notaries at hospitals
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=463

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October 5, 2019

Hospital signing in reverse. The Notary was bedridden

Filed under: Hospital & Jail Signings — admin @ 11:20 pm

A Notary had to go to the hospital for a hernia. He was in pain and drugged part of the time. But, he had a thriving business. and his customers would come to see him in the hospital.

CUSTOMER: Hi, I need this Affidavit notarized. I’ll sign it right here. You’re paying attention right?

NOTARY: (nodding off) ummm.

CUSTOMER: You are paying attention right?

NOTARY: Oh yeah..

CUSTOMER: (signs the document) Can you fill out the Jurat and sign it here?

NOTARY: I am not myself today. I might need to do a signature by X

CUSTOMER: According to what you told me last time only elderly customers can do a signature by mark or X.

NOTARY: Just kidding. Let me just fill this out… okay. Now, do you solmenly swear to uphold the constitution of the United States against all enemies foreign and domestic?

CUSTOMER: When you say domestic, does that include Consuela my maid? she is foreign AND a domestic.

NOTARY: You just have to make things complicated.

CUSTOMER: And that Oath has nothing to do with my document. That is the morphene talking, right?

NOTARY: I was just testing you. I’m actually sober, believe it or not. That’s why I’m being so mean. When my father arranged my marriage to Maria he said, “And he’ll beat you constantly — but only when he’s sober which is very little of the time.”

CUSTOMER: How reassuring. Okay, my Oath please? Never mind. I solemnly swear under God that the contents of this document are true and correct to the best of my knowledge.

NOTARY: I hereby affix my stamp. I gotta get out of here. I don’t want to be late to the straight pride parade in Boston of all places. Don’t you just love people from Boston — how refreshing — standing up for traditional values.

CUSTOMER: Yes, I find them refreshing, especially when they call people a “fricking retahd.”

NOTARY: Me too – gotta love it. I pronounce you man and document.

CUSTOMER: I am going to pass on kissing the document.

NOTARY: That will make you more popular in Boston as a result.

You might also like:

12 questions to ask for hospital notarizations
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=20519

A tale of four notaries at hospitals
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=463

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July 9, 2019

A list of things you probably did not add to your notes section

Filed under: Your Notes Section — Tags: , — admin @ 3:08 am

Every Notary profile has a notes section, but Notaries are notoriously sloppy about what they add to their notes section unless they are very seasoned Notaries. So, I compiled a quick list of things you need to add.

1. Uniqueness – What is unique about your service? Do you speak another language, go to hospitals, have an advanced degree, or are Fidelity approved? These things should go up top so that people can see this on the search results. The top of your notes section once again does show up on the search results.

2. Loan Types – What types of loans are you experienced with? Just saying that you do them all doesn’t say much. It is better to make a thoughtful list of the loan types and types of documents that you have signed before.

3. Equipment – Do you have a particular type of printer, scanner, fax, or a mobile office? Make sure to share that with the world.

4. Other Information – Do you have E&O insurance, how much? Are you certified by any particular agency? Are you background screened and by whom?

5. Coverage Areas: How many miles is your radius? What particular counties do you cover? Make it easy. If there are too many if-then statements about you only go to Horry County on an empty stomach if it is before 8pm, unless it is Summer in which case perhaps 8:30pm but only if you feel like it… That is too complicated. Just say you go to Horry County.

6. About You – It is hard for most Notaries to write about themselves. The tendency is to reduce yourself to some cliche adjectives that are identical to have 10,000 other notaries would describe themselves. Avoid this and paint a realistic picture of your style of doing work, about you, your professional background and what is unique to you.

7. Minimums – Some Notaries have a minimum of $100 plus eDocuments. If you stick to particular prices and are not wishy-washy, then publish them in your notes section. That way your calls are pre-filtered. But, if on Monday your minimum is $100, and then on Tuesday you are desperate and lower it to $80, then keep it verbal.

8. Professional backgrounds – Don’t be vague and say you worked in the financial industry. Say what positions you held and what types of work you did. People want specifics not vagueness. Don’t say you worked in the legal industry otherwise we will think you were the window washer at Hartman, Smith, and Stone.

9. A catchy phrase – Most Notaries do not bother to put a catchy one liner in their notes. It might take hours to think of. Good business names are equally hard to think of. People who search for Notaries are bored reading boring notes sections. If you can make up something interesting and catchy to say, you will inspire people to call you. If you are serious about the business, it is worth your time.

10. Organization tips – Don’t write a notes section that is a jumble. Keep each section well organized and separated by a line of space. It is easier to read and more pleasant too. Please remember that those reading your profile read hundreds of profiles and will be more likely to use you if you come across as being organized.

You might also like:

How to write a notes section if you are a beginner
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2014 Excerpts from great notes sections
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March 24, 2019

A list of things you probably forgot to put in your notes section

Filed under: Your Notes Section — Tags: , — admin @ 4:34 am

Most Notaries write a notes section for their listing on 123notary. However, many do not know what to write. Here are some things you should write about. Take this as a check list.

Experience
Write about the types of loans or documents you know how to sign. Write about the type of work you did before you were a Notary or what distinguishes your experience as a notary. How many loans as well as how many years would also help the reader get an idea of what type of experience you have. Read more by clicking the link below…
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19052

Additional Information
Your certifications, courses taken, E&O, background screening, etc., Don’t forget to write about this because people do care.

Equipment
If you have special equipment, portable printers, scanners, fax machines, inverters, etc., people want to read about this. But, don’t put it up top as this is supplemental information. Experience and selling features go up top.

Special Skills
Are you bilingual? Do you visit hospitals or jails? How about a wide radius? Are you on the white glove list somewhere? Do you take credit cares or square? Put this up top as it is a selling feature.

Areas Covered
Your radius, counties or cities covered go at the bottom and there are 12 boxes to put your counties covered which includes your home county. We discourage putting zip codes as the list gets very long and messy and nobody wants to read it.

About You
This is the most misunderstood aspect of notes writing. Most people cannot write about themselves other than a long string of adjectives. Any idiot can write about how responsible and reliable they are and the more they claim these adjectives the less true I find them to be. However, describing yourself with specific facts is more helpful as well as credible. The fact you have an MBA, worked with the elderly at a nursing home for ten years or are ex-military are real facts about you. The fact you triple check your work and have your local FedEx stations memorized is fact vs. fluff.

Catchy Phrases
It is hard for most people to write a catchy phrase, but it can really pay off. People are bored with reading 1000 notes sections that all seem very similar. It sometimes looks like the same person wrote all of the notes sections on Notary Rotary… “I am reliable, background screened and have 50,000 E&O. I have signed many loans and do a lot of refinances.” After you see this a few thousand times you start seeing double. Put something unique and organized for a change. We wrote a few articles (that I linked below) on catchy phrases in notes sections and you should read those.
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=14690

Buzzwords to avoid
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=19054

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Examples of great notes sections
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=18862

How to write a notes section
http://blog.123notary.com/?p=16698

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