Pigs at a closing (oink) « Notary Blog – Signing Tips, Marketing Tips, General Notary Advice – 123notary.com
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January 27, 2013

Pigs at a closing (oink)

Filed under: Humor — Tags: , , — admin @ 9:04 am

Remember the 1960′s when hippies rudely called the police “pigs,” and “pigs” meant police? Not nice. For our borrowers, the word is used to describe–well, pigs; real pigs, and maybe a few ex-spouses. I could not have imagined hearing two stories about pet pigs from our notaries, but here goes!

“At one refinance, after we sat down at the table, I heard what I thought was growling,” recalls one Pennsylvania notary. “I asked the borrower ‘Do you have a dog?’ ‘No, I have a pig,’ he answered. He opened the bedroom door. It was a 300 lb. pig!” recalls this down-to-earth and successful Pennsylvania notary. “I was sorry I asked. The borrower let the pig out. It would not leave me alone,” he says. “It was just like a dog. The pig kept pushing into my leg,” says the embarrassed Pennsylvania notary. “I had only one hand to do the refinance documents with, because I had the control the pig. The man made me promise not to tell the title company he kept the pig in the house. ‘You’re a real pig,’ I told the pig. It was kind of funny after a while,” says our Pennsylvania notary.

One successful and tenacious California notary recalls a refinance at an elegant house where the borrower kept a pig. “In the Bay area, there is an area called Saratoga. Old money. The people who live there are wealthy,” our notary begins. “Well, this was at night. A refinance. The elderly woman, the borrower, had a cane, and seemed to live all alone. The house was lovely, but it was strange: the flooring had all been pulled up and there was nothing but cement. I assumed the borrower was doing renovations,” the California notary recalls. “There was a strange sound at the back door. Then, the woman opened the door–and it was a 500 lb pig!” says the notary. “I swear; it was enormous. ‘I’ve got to feed my pig,’ says the elderly woman. Then, the pig walked into the house. The woman took the garbage from the outside the back door and gave it to the pig!” says the California notary. “The pig slips on the wood floors, so I pulled them up,” she told our shocked California notary. “Amazing how people live,” the notary admits. “You’ll never see this on Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous. We just proceeded with the documents while the pig slurped and munched,” recalls our notary.

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2 Comments »

  1. Great post. It does bring up a very real concern of mine, though, which is: I want to complete the signing and I want to make the entire process comfortable (as well as convenient) for the borrower. However, must I sit in fear of being bitten by an animal (or mammal) just because the borrower assures me that I won’t be? No title company or signing service ever pays enough to risk my welfare. But, when I’ve excused myself from the signing table at such closings (where animals were present) to call the hiring party in order to alert them to my personal safety concerns and my lack of confidence in the borrowers assertions about same, I’m always told to proceed with the signing or I won’t be paid. Title companies and signing services only care about the documents. They couldn’t care less about the notary. At my last signing, I politely explained my fear to the signer and they put up their “pet.” Maybe the pet is friendly. But, I don’t want to be the notary who gets to test that hypothesis the hard way. Do you?

    Comment by Sean M Henigan — January 30, 2013 @ 9:24 am

  2. WEll I’m a notary who has pet pigs and they live in the house. I can tell you that both those pigs in your story were very over weight and that you don’t feed pigs garbage. Pigs train very easily and can be taught to be behave. No reason for the pig to be bothering the notary while she or he was doing her job.

    Comment by Carolyn Hardy — January 30, 2013 @ 11:14 pm

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